While developing an API using SpringBoot, I had to make a QueryBuilder in order to build a query which can fetch results from Database using JDBC.

My initial structure of Query looked Like

public static class Query {
    private String table;
    private QueryType queryType;
    private List<String> column;
    private List<Fields> where;
    private List<String> groupBy;
    private String orderBy;
    private Map<String,Object> extraFields;
}

To set the values in given fields I used public functions like :

public Query addTable(final String tableName){
        this.table = tableName;
        return this;
    }

public Query addExtraField( String key, Object value){
        if(null==this.extraFields)
            extraFields = new HashMap<>();
        this.extraFields.put(key,value);
        return this;
    }

And to finally build the query a function called toQuery() was used which appended different clauses of a query into one string.

toQuery() Function looked like folowing:

 private static String toQuery(Query query){
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    sb.append(query.queryType.name());
    return sb.toString();
 }

And a query was then built by using :

QueryBuilder.Query().addTable(sometable).addQueryType(sometype).addExtraFields(somefieldsmap).toQuery();

However, some queries required ExtraFields while some did not. So, in toQuery() function I used following code :

if(query.extraFields()==null || query.extraFields.size()<2){
 // do Something
}

Now, my question is that why didn't it throw an error at the compile time saying that I could not use .size() condition because it was possible that the extraFields Map was not intialized depending upon the fact that addExtraFields() was used or not. It kept throwing NullPointerException on the runtime when the condition occured but did not throw an error on Compile time like it does in following simple example :

 import java.util.*;
 import java.lang.*;
 import java.io.*;
 class Ideone{
     public static void main (String[] args) {
       HashMap<String, String> map;
       boolean temp = false;
       if(temp){map = new HashMap<>();}
       System.out.println(map.size());
    }
 }
  • 1
    Because "not initialized" is something very different than "null value". The field has the value null by default. – luk2302 Sep 14 at 10:24
  • Try to remove the parentheses here if(query.extraFields()==null. It should be if(query.extraFields==null – RubenDG Sep 14 at 10:26

The fields of a class do not need to be explicitly initialized before use. They are implicitly initialized to the default value for the field's type:

  • false for the type boolean
  • zero for a primitive numeric type
  • null for a reference type.

That is why query.extraFields is null in some circumstances.

The rules are different for local variables, which is why your last example is a compilation error. (According to the JLS definite assignment rules, there is a path to the println call in which map may not have been assigned a value. Since map is a local variable, this is a compilation error.)

To answer your question as to why the last code block throws compilation error, we need to refer to the Java Language Specification:

For every access of a local variable or blank final field x, x must be definitely assigned before the access, or a compile-time error occurs.

Because the variable map is declared without initialization. The initialization happens inside an if-block, so the compiler cannot definitely know if it was initialized or not, hence the compilation error. If you were to change boolean temp to final and assign it true value, the compiler error will disappear because now the variable temp is final, so the compiler can determine that the if block must have been executed and the map variable initialized definitely.

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