3

The following code works perfectly. It shows the spinner on the UI, starts a task using a thread from the threadpool and runs the heavy operation, once complete, logic to hide the spinner executes on the main thread as intended.

    public void LoadCustomers()
    {
        // Update UI to show spinner
        this.LoadingCustomers = true;

        Task.Run(async () =>            
        {
            var customers = await this.custService.GetCustomers();
            // code truncated for clarity

            Device.BeginInvokeOnMainThread(() => 
            {
                // Update UI to hide spinner
                this.LoadingCustomers = false;
            });
        });
    }

My question; Is there a better way to write this logic using ContinueWith/ConfigureAwait options? Using these options seems to block the UI thread. In the example below, shouldn't the UI thread continue running the UI logic (animating the spinner/user input) and then come back to complete the logic inside the ContinueWith?

    public void LoadCustomers()
    {
        // Update UI to show spinner
        this.LoadingCustomers = true;

        this.custService.GetCustomers().ContinueWith((t) =>
        {
            var customers = t.Result;
            // code truncated for clarity

            // Update UI to hide spinner
            this.LoadingCustomers = false;
        });
    }

As requested in the comments, here is the code for GetCustomers. the dbContext is EntityFrameworkCore.

    public async Task<List<CustomerModel>> GetCustomers()
    {
        return await this.dbContext.Customers.ToListAsync();
    }

UPDATE

The answer by FCin is correct, however; the cause root of this seems to be with EFCore and ToListAsync, it isn't running asynchronously.

5
  • 1
    How is GetCustomers implemented? It might be blocking before it returns a Task. You can also make LoadCustomers be async Task and thus avoid having to explicitly use ContinueWith (or async void if you need it as a handler of a specific type) – Mor A. Sep 14 '18 at 11:17
  • What framework? Asp.net? wpf? winforms? – FCin Sep 14 '18 at 11:18
  • I've updated the question with the GetCustomers method, and it is a Xamarin Forms project – Noobie3001 Sep 14 '18 at 11:21
  • If GetCustomers is already an async supporting Task, why bother using Task.Run, instead of just awaiting it directly? The compiler will automatically convert your async methods in to a series of continuations behind the scenes. This is exactly what async / await was designed for. – Bradley Uffner Sep 14 '18 at 11:25
  • [...]Unless there is something in the // code truncated for clarity that requires a different thread. If it's just "normal" code, I would strongly recommend directly awaiting; you won't have to worry about marshaling across threads at all. – Bradley Uffner Sep 14 '18 at 11:30
8

Proper way of writing such method is to use async/await from start to finish. Right now you are doing fire and forget meaning if there is exception inside Task.Run you will never know about it. You should start from an event handler. This can be whatever, mouse click, page loaded, etc.

private async void MouseEvent_Click(object sender, EventArgs args)
{
    await LoadCustomers();
}

public async Task LoadCustomers()
{
    // Update UI to show spinner
    this.LoadingCustomers = true;

    // We don't need Device.BeginInvokeOnMainThread, because await automatically 
    // goes back to calling thread when it is finished
    var customers = await this.custService.GetCustomers();

    this.LoadingCustomers = false;
}

There is an easy way to remember when to use Task.Run. Use Task.Run only when you do something CPU bound, such as calculating digits of PI.

1
  • 1
    you need to add async to event handler signature. – Selman Genç Sep 14 '18 at 11:25
0

EDIT: @bradley-uffner suggested to just write the following:

public async Task LoadCustomers()
{
    // Update UI to show spinner
    this.LoadingCustomers = true;

    var customers = await this.custService.GetCustomers();
    // code truncated for clarity

    // you are still on UI thread here
    this.LoadingCustomers = false;
}

How about this:

public async Task LoadCustomers()
{
    // Update UI to show spinner
    this.LoadingCustomers = true;

    await Task.Run(async () =>            
    {
        var customers = await this.custService.GetCustomers();
        // code truncated for clarity
    });

    this.LoadingCustomers = false;
}

The code after await is executed on the current thread so it should work out of the box.

2
  • 3
    If this.custService.GetCustomers() is already an async supporting Task, why bothing using Task.Run, instead of just awaiting it directly? – Bradley Uffner Sep 14 '18 at 11:24
  • I actually didn't even inspect the content of the code :D Let me fix that. – Toni Petrina Sep 17 '18 at 6:55

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.