The code below is a simplified version of a Tornado based TCP server that is currently used to host a Videotex system. This code was derived from the Tornado documentation and the server has been running in a live environment for some time without issue, however, there is a feature I need to add.

The system currently blocks until a character is received from the client before returning the data via the stream.write. As the system typically runs at 1200 baud at the client end (via a telnet modem), this means that the user has to wait until all stream writes have completed before the next 'user entered' character is processed.

What I would like to do is find a way that would allow me to abandon writing data to stream.write if another character is received form the client.

I am new to Tornado and fairly new to Python, however, I have coded asynchronous functions and threaded solutions in the past using C#.

From the documentation the stream.write operation is asynchronous, I am assuming therefore that the call may return before the data is completely written, I am left thinking that I need a method to abandon/empty/advance the write buffer to stop the write operation if a new char is detected on the stream.read.

One option that would seem to give me what I need is to somehow perform the stream.writes on another thread , however, this approach seems inappropriate when using Tornado's IOLoop etc.

Is there a way to give me the facility I am after? I have full control of the code and am happy to restructure the app if needed.

import logging
import struct
import os
import traceback

from tornado import gen
from tornado.ioloop import IOLoop
from tornado.iostream import StreamClosedError
from tornado.tcpserver import TCPServer

# Configure logging.
logger = logging.getLogger(os.path.basename(__file__))
logger.setLevel(logging.INFO)

# Cache this struct definition; important optimization.
int_struct = struct.Struct("<i")
_UNPACK_INT = int_struct.unpack
_PACK_INT = int_struct.pack


class TornadoServer(TCPServer):

    def start(self, port):

        self.port = port
        server.listen(port)

    @gen.coroutine
    def handle_stream(self, stream, address):

        logging.info("[viewdata] Connection from client address {0}.".format(address))
        try:

            while True:

                char = yield stream.read_bytes(1) # this call blocks

                asc = ord(char)
                logger.info('[viewdata] Byte Received {0} ({1})'.format(hex(asc), asc))

                # Do some processing using the received char and return the appropriate page of data
                stream.write('This is the data you asked for...'.encode())

        except StreamClosedError as ex:
            logger.info("[viewdata] {0} Disconnected: {1} Message: {2}".format(address, type(ex), str(ex)))
        except Exception as ex:
            logger.error("[viewdata] {0} Exception: {1} Message: {2}".format(address, type(ex), str(ex)))
            logger.error(traceback.format_exc())


if __name__ == '__main__':

    server = TornadoServer()
    server.start(25232)

    loop = IOLoop.current()
    loop.start()

The main idea is that you move long processing into separate task. When you receive some new data, you choose what to do (in case below I cancel current operation)

import logging
import os
import traceback

import threading
from tornado import gen
from tornado.ioloop import IOLoop
from tornado.iostream import StreamClosedError
from tornado.tcpserver import TCPServer

# Configure logging.
logger = logging.getLogger(os.path.basename(__file__))
logger.setLevel(logging.INFO)

class TornadoServer(TCPServer):

    def start(self, port):

        self.port = port
        server.listen(port)

    async def process_stream(self, stream, char, cancel_event):
        asc = ord(char)
        logger.info('[viewdata] Byte Received {0} ({1})'.format(hex(asc), asc))
        N = 5
        for i in range(N):
            if cancel_event.is_set():
                logger.info('[viewdata] Abort streaming')
                break
            # Do some processing using the received char and return the appropriate page of data
            msg = 'This is the {0} data you asked for...'.format(i)
            logger.info(msg)
            await stream.write('This is the part {0} of {1} you asked for...'.format(i, N).encode())
            await gen.sleep(1.0)  # make this processing longer..


    async def handle_stream(self, stream, address):

        process_stream_future = None
        cancel_event = None

        logging.info("[viewdata] Connection from client address {0}.".format(address))
        while True:
            try:

                char = await stream.read_bytes(1)  # this call blocks

                # when received client input, cancel running job
                if process_stream_future:
                    process_stream_future.cancel()
                if cancel_event:
                    cancel_event.set()

                cancel_event = threading.Event()
                process_stream_future = gen.convert_yielded(
                    self.process_stream(stream, char, cancel_event))
                self.io_loop.add_future(process_stream_future, lambda f: f.result())

            except StreamClosedError as ex:
                logger.info("[viewdata] {0} Disconnected: {1} Message: {2}".format(address, type(ex), str(ex)))
            except Exception as ex:
                logger.error("[viewdata] {0} Exception: {1} Message: {2}".format(address, type(ex), str(ex)))
                logger.error(traceback.format_exc())


if __name__ == '__main__':

    server = TornadoServer()
    server.listen(25232)

    loop = IOLoop.current()
    loop.start()
  • Thanks for this, I have this example working. I am new to python so please forgive me if this seems like a stupid question... I notice that the stream object is passed to the process_stream method and wondered if this needed some form of locking mechanism? or am I misunderstanding something. – John Newcombe Sep 30 at 1:13
  • You don't need extra locking - GIL protects you. – vav Sep 30 at 3:49

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