In the event of an IndexError, is there a way to tell which object on a line is 'out of range'?

Consider this code:

a = [1,2,3]
b = [1,2,3]

x, y = get_values_from_somewhere()

try:
   a[x] = b[y]
except IndexError as e:
   ....

In the event that x or y is too large and IndexError gets caught, I would like to know which of a or b is out of range (so I can perform different actions in the except block).

Clearly I could compare x and y to len(a) and len(b) respectively, but I am curious if there is another way of doing it using IndexError.

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A more robust approach would be to tap into the traceback object returned by sys.exc_info(), extract the code indicated by the file name and line number from the frame, use ast.parse to parse the line, subclass ast.NodeVisitor to find all the Subscript nodes, unparse (with astunparse) and eval the nodes with the frame's global and local variables to see which of the nodes causes exception, and print the offending expression:

import sys
import linecache
import ast
import astunparse

def find_index_error():
    tb = sys.exc_info()[2]
    frame = tb.tb_frame
    lineno = tb.tb_lineno
    filename = frame.f_code.co_filename
    line = linecache.getline(filename, lineno, frame.f_globals)
    class find_index_error_node(ast.NodeVisitor):
        def visit_Subscript(self, node):
            expr = astunparse.unparse(node).strip()
            try:
                eval(expr, frame.f_globals, frame.f_locals)
            except IndexError:
                print("%s causes IndexError" % expr)
    find_index_error_node().visit(ast.parse(line.strip(), filename))

a = [1,2,3]
b = [1,2,3]
x, y = 1, 2
def f():
    return 3
try:
    a[f() - 1] = b[f() + y] + a[x + 1] # can you guess which of them causes IndexError?
except IndexError:
    find_index_error()

This outputs:

b[(f() + y)] causes IndexError
  • Nice. Perhaps you could edit this answer so that everything in the except block is in a function that can be used whenever the developer needs to unpick what caused an IndexError? – David Board Sep 14 at 16:03
  • 1
    Sure. Edited as suggested then. – blhsing Sep 14 at 16:10

There is a way, but I wouldn't consider it as very robust. There is a subtle difference in the error messages:

a = [1,2,3]
b = [1,2,3]

a[2] = b[3]

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
IndexError                                Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-69-8e0d280b609d> in <module>()
      2 b = [1,2,3]
      3 
----> 4 a[2] = b[3]

IndexError: list index out of range

But if the error is on the left hand side:

a[3] = b[2]

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
IndexError                                Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-68-9d66e07bc70d> in <module>()
      2 b = [1,2,3]
      3 
----> 4 a[3] = b[2]

IndexError: list assignment index out of range

Note the 'assignment' in the message.

So, you could do something like:

a = [1,2,3]
b = [1,2,3]

try:
    a[3] = b[2]
except IndexError as e:
    message = e.args[0]
    if 'assignment' in message:
        print("Error on left hand side")
    else:
        print("Error on right hand side")

Output:

# Error on left hand side

Again, I wouldn't trust it too much, it would fail if the message changes in another version of Python.


I had a look at these parts of the source code, these different messages are really the only difference between the two errors.

  • that's very good indeed! – Jean-François Fabre Sep 14 at 13:01
  • 1
    Also, the assignment is never reached in the first. You cannot differentiate the third case where both would raise an error. – schwobaseggl Sep 14 at 13:02
  • 1
    @schwobaseggl That's right, as the right hand side is evaluated first, it is where the error would be raised. – Thierry Lathuille Sep 14 at 13:05
  • good spot! and i totally agree this should not be relied on though as an implementation detail – Chris_Rands Sep 14 at 13:38

The IndexError exception does not store information about what raised the exception. Its only data is an error message. You have to craft your code to do so.

a = [1,2,3]
b = [1,2,3]

x, y = get_values_from_somewhere()

try:
    value = b[y]
except IndexError as e:
   ...

try:
    a[x] = value
except IndexError as e:
    ...

I want to add I tried to recover the culprit through inspect.frame and was unable to do so. Thus I suspect there really is no robust way.

Finally, note that this is specific to IndexError as other exceptions may contain the needed information to infer what caused them. By example a KeyError contains the key that raised it.

  • 1
    Knowing the key might still not be enough, e.g. x = a[key] + b[key]. – Barmar Sep 14 at 16:52
  • Totally agree with this independent inspection and validation. It makes life easier – oblalex 4 hours ago

Something like this perhaps?

a = [1,2,3]
b = [2,3,4]
x = 5
y = 1

try:
    a[x] = b[y]
except IndexError:
    try:
        a[x]
        print('b caused indexerror')
    except IndexError:
        print('a caused indexerror')

No, there is no way of deducing which of the two is out of bounds using the IndexError thrown.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.