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I know that X.(Y+Z) = X.Y+X.Z but does X.(Y.Z) = (X.Y).(X.Z) is true?

Please give me help.

4
  • wrong board. go to stats.stackexchange.com
    – 5th
    Commented Sep 14, 2018 at 13:23
  • SO is for programming questions. For guidance please read how to ask questions and how to create a minimal example
    – 5th
    Commented Sep 14, 2018 at 13:23
  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about boolean algebra and Mathematics instead of programming or software development.
    – Pang
    Commented Sep 21, 2018 at 9:24
  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not a computer programming question. Commented Apr 26, 2019 at 3:20

1 Answer 1

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Yes it is. X.(Y.Z) = (X.Y).(X.Z). Because X.X=X, one X on the RHS can be removed and we end up with the LHS.
(X.Y).(X.Z) = (X.X).(Y.Z) = (X).(Y.Z) = X.(Y.Z)
You can draw a truth table and verify it yourself.

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  • Assuming that . means multiply, X.X is not X. It is X^2. 2*2 doesn't equal 2. Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 10:13
  • @JamesWhiteley I hope you know what you're talking about. The question was about Boolean algebra, not ordinary algebra. In ordinary algebra, $X.X = X^2$ where $.$ is the multiplication operator. In Boolean algebra, $X.X = X$, where $.$ is the AND operator. Multiplication is analogous to AND operation in Boolean algebra. And as per your example, $2.2$ is $4$ in ordinary algebra, but in Boolean algebra $2.2 = 2$. Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 11:04
  • I had completely missed the “boolean” part of the question. Fair enough. Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 11:11

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