I have a Window who in it's content has one UserControl and a Button. Now, I want to hide that Button depending if the RadioButton inside UserControl is checked or not. I have tried folowing, but it doesn't work.

My Window looks like this:

<Window x:Class="SimpleMVVMExample"
   xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
   xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
   Height="350" Width="525">
   <DockPanel>
      <local:uc1 x:Name="UserControl1"></local:uc1>
      <Button Visibility="{Binding IsChecked,ElementName=UserControl1.rb1}"/>
   </DockPanel>
</Window>

And the UserControl uc1 looks like this:

<UserControl x:Class="SimpleMVVMExample"
   xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
   xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
   Height="350" Width="525">
   <DockPanel>
      <RadioButton x:Name="rb1" IsChecked={Binding SomeProperty}/>
   </DockPanel>
</UserControl>
  • Have you considered following MVVM and binding to properties of the viewmodel? – Nkosi Sep 17 at 10:29
  • @Nkosi I have. But I'm trying to use pure XAML. – FiN Sep 17 at 10:30

You can only bind to Dependency Properties in your UserControl, there is no way (afaik) to access the XAML elements inside your UserControl like that, so what you need to do is to define a new Dependency Property in your UserControl and then bind your Button's visibility to it.

If you're creating a UserControl that needs to expose information to the "outside XAML world", this is how you should do it in my opinion.

UserControl1.xaml.cs:

public static readonly DependencyProperty IsRb1CheckedProperty = 
    DependencyProperty.Register("IsRb1Checked",
    typeof(bool), typeof(UserControl1), new PropertyMetadata(default(bool)));

public bool IsRb1Checked
{
    get => (bool) GetValue(IsRb1CheckedProperty);
    set => SetValue(IsRb1CheckedProperty, value);
}

Now we need to bind the RadioButton to that property, but since the DataContext of the UserControl is inherited from the parent, it will not work out of the box.

You can either set the DataContext of the DockPanel inside your UserControl to itself (Do NOT change the UserControls DataContext), or you can just give your UserControl a Name and use ElementName in your RadioButton binding:

Let's go with the latter method since it's clearer.

UserControl1.xaml

<UserControl x:Class="WpfPlayground.UserControl1" 
             x:Name="UserControlRoot"
    <RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding ElementName=UserControlRoot, Path=IsRb1Checked}"/>
</UserControl>

I'm binding the RadioButton to IsRb1Checked directly, I don't know what 'SomeProperty' is in your example, but you can make a wrapper property that sets both booleans, or even better use the Checked event to toggle IsRb1Checked.

Then in your Window, remember to use the built-in BooleanToVisibilityConverter:

<Window.Resources>
    <BooleanToVisibilityConverter x:Key="BoolToVisibilityConverter" />
</Window.Resources>
<DockPanel>
    <local:UserControl1 x:Name="UserControl1"></local:UserControl1>
    <Button Visibility="{Binding ElementName=UserControl1, Path=IsRb1Checked,
                                 Converter={StaticResource BoolToVisibilityConverter}}"/>
</DockPanel>

A small comment about MVVM: It doesn't necessarily help in this case. I will either be forced to give the UserControl its own ViewModel then instantiate it in the parent ViewModel, or give the UserControl the parent ViewModel, which would prevent reusability. The best way is to expose a Dependency Property.

  • I have already exposed the element to the UserControl, and it's working for now. Since I was searching for pure XAML example i got to the wall, and for now I'm going with this one, plus you have detailed the steps to the solution. – FiN Sep 20 at 7:36

Assumption: IsChecked property is of type Boolean. The Button Visibilityaccepts a value of either Visible, Collapsed or Hidden. You need a Boolean to visibility converter for the application to understand what needs to be done when value is true or false.

Create a resource as shown below.

<Window......>
     <Window.Resources>
          <BooleanToVisiblityConverter x:Key="BooleanToVisibilityConverter"/>
     </Window.Resources>
      .....................
      ....................
</Window>

Update the Button Visiblity as shown below.

<Button Visibility="{Binding IsChecked,ElementName=UserControl1.rb1, Converter={StaticResource BooleanToVisibilityConverter}"/>

Create a BooleanToVisibilityConverter as shown below.

public class BooleanToVisibilityConverter : MarkupExtension, IValueConverter
{
    /// <summary>
    ///     This converter can be used to show, hide and collapse controls.
    ///     It collapse the control if <see cref="collapseIfFalse" /> is true, hides other wise by default.
    /// </summary>
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object collapseIfFalse, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        var collapse = collapseIfFalse is bool && (bool)collapseIfFalse;

        var visible = value is bool && (bool) value;

        return visible
            ? Visibility.Visible
            : collapse ? Visibility.Collapsed : Visibility.Hidden;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override object ProvideValue(IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
    {
        return this;
    }
}
  • 2
    Have you tried your code? – FiN Sep 17 at 8:09

I understand that you asked about doing this in XAML but I'd suggest doing it in the code behind/model layer instead. I'd databind the ischecked property to a property in the code behind and have a second property that checks that one in its getter to figure out if the button should be shown.

public bool IsChecked { get; set; }
public Visibility ButtonVisibility {
get
{
    if ( IsChecked ) ...
}}

That way if the logic for when the button is enabled or not changes you can add the more complicated logic in the code rather than trying to hunt around figuring out if you can even do it in XAML. This way you also separate the logic of "when things are shown" from how they are shown. The XAML becomes dumb: this is how I present data. The business rules about how things work are all in C#/sql whatever more expressive (at least IMO) language.

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