I am using session storage to store my application state. I have an initial state which looks something like this:

appState = { 
titles :['Mr', 'Ms', 'Mrs', 'Miss', 'Dr'],
addresses : [],
labels : []
}

This 'appState' is saved using $sessionStorage.appstate. When the application loads, the 'labels' array of my appState needs to get populated.

I do this by a $get request in the run block angular.module('app').run(...populate appState); which then returns my labels and these labels are then saved to the sessionStorage for use by the application.

In my controllers when I try to access the appState.labels from the $sessionStorage when the app first loads, the labels are still not populated and the content that I bind the labels to are not shown. If I refresh the page, they are then loaded from the sessionStorage and all is working.

Now the reason (I believe) is that the binding is occurring BEFORE my $get has resolved so my appState.labels is still empty. How do I have my application 'Load and wait' until the $get labels has completed before it actually binds my data?

I have read that I should place initialisation code in the run block.

  • With $get you mean $http.get() call ? – Shashank Vivek Sep 15 at 4:57
  • did my ans helped? – Shashank Vivek Sep 17 at 18:16
  • 1
    As far as doing what is required, yes, however I ended up using 'resolve' in my route config which returns a promise so the controller will only instantiate once my content service $http resolves. Thanks for your help! – Ralph W Sep 18 at 9:27
  • Cool, i thought u needed it in run phase so I provided this approach – Shashank Vivek Sep 20 at 3:31

Assuming your case where you want to fetch the data first before the site loads, the best way would be to use manual bootstrapping where you get the data first and then loads the application. For that you need to do few things:

  1. remove ng-app="myApp" from your index.html file because we want to initialise this app based on our $http response promise.

app.js

(function() {
    var initInjector = angular.injector(['ng']);
    var $http = initInjector.get('$http');
    $http.get('/get_label_details/',{headers: {'Cache-Control' : 'no-cache'}}).then(
        function (response) {
            angular.module('myApp.labels', []).constant('LABELS', response.data);
            // manually bootstrapping 
            angular.element(document).ready(function() {
                angular.bootstrap(document, ['myApp']);
            });
        }
    );
})();
  1. use the myApp.labels module when you bootstrap myApp module which would be basically attached to your document object of index.html.

something like below:

var mainApp = angular.module('myApp',['myApp.labels']);

mainApp.run(function(LABELS){
    console.log(LABELS); // you have it here at the run phase
})

so your final app.js will look like

(function() {
    var initInjector = angular.injector(['ng']);
    var $http = initInjector.get('$http');
    $http.get('/get_label_details/',{headers: {'Cache-Control' : 'no-cache'}}).then(
        function (response) {
            angular.module('myApp.labels', []).constant('LABELS', response.data);

            angular.element(document).ready(function() {
                angular.bootstrap(document, ['myApp']);
            });
        }
    );
})();


var mainApp = angular.module('myApp',['myApp.labels']);

mainApp.run(function(LABELS){
    console.log(LABELS); // you have it here at the run phase
})

I ended up using the route resolve which waits for the promise to be resolved before instantiating the controller. Thanks for the input!

const RouteConfig = ($stateProvider) => {
  'ngInject';
  // HOME
  $stateProvider
    .state('app.root', {
      url: '/',
      abstract: true,
      controller: 'HomeCtrl',
      controllerAs: '$ctrl',
      templateUrl: 'home/index.html',
      resolve:{ 
        store: StoreService => { 
          console.log('Resolving store...'); 
          // Waits to resolve promise before instantiating controller.
          return StoreService.asyncCreateStore();          
         }
      }
    })
}

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