I would like to count how many plus and minus signs, as well as asterisks and question marks there are for each row for all variables.

For example:

* Example generated by -dataex-. To install: ssc install dataex
clear
input str1(var1 var2 var3 var4 var5 var6 var7 var8 var9 var10)
"+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+"
"+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "-" "+" "-" "+"
"+" "-" "-" "-" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "?"
"+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "-" "-" "-" "-"
"+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "*" "*" "*" "*" "*"
"+" "+" "+" "+" "-" "-" "-" "*" "*" "*"
"+" "*" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+"
"+" "+" "+" "+" "-" "-" "-" "-" "-" "-"
"-" "-" "-" "-" "-" "-" "+" "+" "+" "+"
"+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+"
end

How can I count these given that my variables are all strings?

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd do this purely from string manipulations. If we concatenate all to a single string, we can count any character we please by the following device: pretend to replace each instance of that character by nothing (so, pretend to remove it) and then see how much shorter the string is. This trick was written up in this 2011 paper accessible to all.

Counting asterisks is just another example.

The concatenated combination has other uses, especially if the variables refer to a sequence or history of some kind.

I here repeat the code to create your data example for the convenience of anyone wishing to play with the code.

clear
input str1(var1 var2 var3 var4 var5 var6 var7 var8 var9 var10)
"+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+"
"+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "-" "+" "-" "+"
"+" "-" "-" "-" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "?"
"+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "-" "-" "-" "-"
"+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "*" "*" "*" "*" "*"
"+" "+" "+" "+" "-" "-" "-" "*" "*" "*"
"+" "*" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+"
"+" "+" "+" "+" "-" "-" "-" "-" "-" "-"
"-" "-" "-" "-" "-" "-" "+" "+" "+" "+"
"+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+" "+"
end

egen all = concat(var*) 

gen plus = 10 - length(subinstr(all, "+", "", .)) 
gen minus = 10 - length(subinstr(all, "-", "", .)) 
gen question = 10 - length(subinstr(all, "?", "", .)) 

list all plus minus question, sep(0) 

     +--------------------------------------+
     |        all   plus   minus   question |
     |--------------------------------------|
  1. | ++++++++++     10       0          0 |
  2. | ++++++-+-+      8       2          0 |
  3. | +---+++++?      6       3          1 |
  4. | ++++++----      6       4          0 |
  5. | +++++*****      5       0          0 |
  6. | ++++---***      4       3          0 |
  7. | +*++++++++      9       0          0 |
  8. | ++++------      4       6          0 |
  9. | ------++++      4       6          0 |
 10. | ++++++++++     10       0          0 |
     +--------------------------------------+
  • 1
    Very nice (+1). I had forgotten about the concat() function. – Pearly Spencer Sep 14 at 17:21
  • Thanks! That was written by me in or before 1999 ... it was probably just implementing ideas floating around at the time. – Nick Cox Sep 14 at 17:24

First replace each symbol with a number and use destring to convert the variables to numeric:

ds var*
local varlist `r(varlist)'

foreach var of local varlist {
    replace `var' = "1" if `var' == "+"
    replace `var' = "2" if `var' == "-"
    replace `var' = "3" if `var' == "*"
    replace `var' = "4" if `var' == "?"
}

destring var*, replace

Then you can obtain the counts through the function anycount() of the egen command:

forvalues i = 1 / 4 { 
    egen var`i's = anycount(`varlist'), val(`i')
}

list var*s 

      +-------------------------------+
     | var1s   var2s   var3s   var4s |
     |-------------------------------|
  1. |    10       0       0       0 |
  2. |     8       2       0       0 |
  3. |     6       3       0       1 |
  4. |     6       4       0       0 |
  5. |     5       0       5       0 |
     |-------------------------------|
  6. |     4       3       3       0 |
  7. |     9       0       1       0 |
  8. |     4       6       0       0 |
  9. |     4       6       0       0 |
 10. |    10       0       0       0 |
     +-------------------------------+

Note that you can use variables with different names with the ds command.

  • Your opening code could be replaced with foreach var of varlist var* (although I would rewrite the loop in terms of say foreach v of varlist var*). – Nick Cox Sep 15 at 6:44
  • 1
    Thanks Nick! Yes i know. I intentionally used ds so the OP can use variables with different names. Your approach would require that too in such a case. – Pearly Spencer Sep 15 at 9:42

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