I have a Map that has a type as:

val m: HashMap[Double, (Double, Long)]

When I run the retain method:

m.retain(p => true)

It complains Type mismatch. Expected: (Double, (Double, Long)) => Boolean, actual: Double => Boolean

Then I tried to add the type signature to the parameter:

m.retain(p: (Double, (Double, Long)) => true)

It then complains Type mismatch. Expected: (Double, (Double, Long)) => Boolean, actual: (Double, (Double, Long)) => Boolean, which does not make sense to me because they are the same.

I also tried:

m.retain((k,(v,t))=>true)

Still giving a Type mismatch error.

I thought it could be error with checker so I tried running compiler then gives me another different error: identifier expected but 'true' found

How can I do retain in this case?

up vote 3 down vote accepted

scala.collection.mutable.MapLike.retain parameter p is a function that takes two arguments: key and value (it's not a function that takes a tuple with key and value)

You need to write it like this:

m.retain((k, v) => true)

Or like this:

m.retain({
  case (k, v) => true
})

Or like this:

m.retain({
  case (k, (v1, v2)) => true
})
  • The last one is what I was expecting... So there is an implicit conversion from PartialFunction to lambda? Where can I find any reference to that? – texasbruce Sep 14 at 17:09
  • You can use PartialFunction with pattern matching for implementing both functions (a function that takes multiple arguments and a function that takes a tuple). – Aleksey Isachenkov Sep 14 at 17:14
  • Ya so PartialFunction case clause destructs the nested tuple? The regular function cannot seem to do that like m.retain((k,(v,t))=>true) gives error... – texasbruce Sep 14 at 17:23
  • I wrote another answer for this – Aleksey Isachenkov Sep 14 at 17:40
  • 1
    m.retain((k,(v,t))=>true) gives error because lambda can't extract tuple (v, t) from map value. Lets wait for dotty dotty.epfl.ch/docs/reference/auto-parameter-tupling.html – Aleksey Isachenkov Sep 14 at 18:15

You have the following functions:

//function that takes a function that takes multiple arguments
def test1(f: (Int, Int) => Boolean): Boolean = f(0, 0)
//function that takes a function that takes a tuple
def test2(f: ((Int, Int)) => Boolean): Boolean = f((0, 0))

When you use PartialFunction and write

test1({
  case (v1, v2) => true
})

it equals to

test1((arg1, arg2) => (arg1, arg2) match {
  case (v1, v2) => true
})

But when you use PartialFunction and write

test2({
  case (v1, v2) => true
})

it equals to

test2(tuple => tuple match {
  case (v1, v2) => true
})

Both cases seem the same, but they work differently. In the case of multiple arguments, match process the tuple of arguments. In the case of a single tuple argument, match process this tuple.

  • Thanks for the explanation! – texasbruce Sep 14 at 18:00

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