Say I have services A, B and C that can perform long-running jobs are part of a larger workflow. In my system there are configurations per user that the services need to do their jobs per user. What I'm wondering is whether pieces of the configurations should be stored in each service or whether there should be a separate service X that deals with the configurations and overall workflow and plugs the pieces of the configurations into each service as it orchestrates the entire workflow.

More concretely, suppose for user 7020cf15-e5d4-433e-bfd3-ca7d529319a5 all the configurations look like

{
   foo: 99973618, // related to service A
   bar: 'Hello, world', // related to service B
   baz: [1, 2, 3] // related to service C
}

Should service A store

{
   userId: '7020cf15-e5d4-433e-bfd3-ca7d529319a5',
   foo: 99973618
}

and service B store

{
   userId: '7020cf15-e5d4-433e-bfd3-ca7d529319a5',
   bar: 'Hello, world'
}

and so forth? Or should there be a separate service X that stores

{
   userId: '7020cf15-e5d4-433e-bfd3-ca7d529319a5',
   foo: 99973618,
   bar: 'Hello, world',
   baz: [1, 2, 3]
}

and A, B, C don't store any configurations (although the services may be stateful and keep histories of the configurations that were inputted to them).

My intuition is in favor of the latter idea because

  • It might not be the case that all the configurations can be categorized as belonging to a single service. There might be a configuration that spans the business domain of A and B.

  • It is less complex to have everything in one place.

  • When the overall workflow runs there is a fixed snapshot of the inputs that will be used.

This question may seem more difficult than it is because you’re mixing 2 concerns – what should be stored and where it should be stored.

Each microservice should have its own set of settings that belong only to it. Combining 3 application settings into the same “AppSettings” object is a bad idea because if microservice A has a foo property, microservice B cannot.

Where those settings are stored and how they are accessed is a different question. It makes sense to have a single SettingsServer endpoint for any app to get their setting data, but each app should have full control of its settings. This implies an app ID is sent to the SettingsServer along with the userID so that each set of app settings can be kept separate.

Note this doesn’t prevent the code from asking for settings for a user in app A and app B at the same time in order to make the query more efficient. An example may be to get security settings for an individual user, and at the same time retrieve a DB connection string for where the data resides for the customer that user works for – user level settings and company level settings in the same call.

Using your example, you would have a single settings store that returned this

{ “userId” : “7020cf15-e5d4-433e-bfd3-ca7d529319a5”,
    "App1":         {
        “foo” : 99973618
    }
    “Global” {
        “connstr” : “asdfasdf”
    }
}

TLDR; Don’t share settings among apps. Do allow querying multiple sets of app settings in the same call to your SettingsServer. Do store all settings in the same place (with appropriate redundancy, fail over, etc.)

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