A class like

class A{
    public:

    const B& instanceOfB ;

    A(const B& someInstanceOfB):
        instanceOfB(someInstanceOfB)
    {
    };

    // some methods depending on instanceOfB here

};

should be extended to provide also some methods which do not depend on instanceOfB, and these methods must be accessible without any instanceOfB (i.e., no instance of B may exist at all).

Hence, a straight forward extension could look like

class A{

    public:

    B* const instanceOfB ;

    A():
    instanceOfB(nullptr)
    {
    }

    // some methods not depending on instanceOfB here

    void assignInstanceOfB(B* const someInstanceOfB){
        instanceOfB = someInstanceOfB;};

    // some methods depending on instanceOfB here

};

However, in my opinion, this has several disadvantages:

  • The original version of the class was easy to use, while for the extended version it must be ensured that assignInstanceOfB is called prior to any other method depending on instanceOfB
  • Basically, any method depending on instanceOfB must check if the initialization was perfomed. This produces a huge (i.e., ugly) overhead.
  • A nullptr initialization is used, which seems to be bad practice in my opinion. I generally try to avoid any pointers.

So i am not really satisfied by this design. What could look a more sophisticated version look like? Thank you!

Edit: Due to the comments, i add following additional requirements: - Splitting of the class is not possible - The reference to B must be stored, it is not possible to hand it only to the respective methods.

To summarize, it seems that using pointers (including smart pointers) is the recommended or at least usual way.

  • IMHO, you should be attempting to avoid the use of references as member variables, not (hopefully smart) pointers. – Neil Butterworth Sep 14 at 17:40
  • 1
    "This produces a huge (i.e., ugly) overhead." comparing a pointer to nullptr is not huge. Is it ugly? That is a matter of taste – Slava Sep 14 at 17:41
  • 2
    @πάνταῥεῖ That statement is too generic. Pointers not always represent ownership. – Slava Sep 14 at 17:42
  • 1
    How about A::A(B* const instanceOfB = nullptr) : instanceOfB{instanceOfB} {}; Also your assignInstanceOfB won't work because instanceOfB is a const pointer. – Richard Critten Sep 14 at 17:45
  • 1
    Any reason not to have A's methods using the instance of B just receive it by const& as a parameter and not have the class have it as a member in the first place? This also have the advantage of delivering the intention that this method relies on this instance, as opposed to methods not taking it. – SkepticalEmpiricist Sep 14 at 17:56

To address your first concern about having to call the initialize function before the object can be used, you could implement two constuctors. One would take in a pointer to B and the other defaults to nulling the pointer.

class A{
    public:

    B* const instanceOfB ;

    A(B* const b) : instanceOfB(b) { }

    A() : A(nullptr) { }
};

In regards to your third concern, using non-owning pointers is the usual way to store a reference to an object that may or may not exist. If you are hell-bent on not using pointers you could use std::optional in a manner such as this:

class A
{
public:
    std::optional<std::reference_wrapper<B>> instanceOfB;

    A(B * const b = nullptr) : instanceOfB(std::nullopt)
    {
         if (b != nullptr)
         {
             instanceOfB = std::make_optional(std::ref(*b));
         }
    }

    void doSomething()
    {
        if (!instanceOfB)
        {
            return;
        }

        instanceOfB->get().something();
    }
};

You need to use std::reference_wrapper since std::optional explicitly does not support storing references directly. You'll still need to check if the optional contains anything before using it, so you still end up needing code that's very similar to checking for a null pointer. There's even worse syntax to access the inner reference, as can be seen in doSomething(). In the end this doesn't seem like it gains you anything, and I wouldn't recommend it.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.