I have two lists, e.g.

coords = [2, 0, 1, 4, 3]
value = [1, 9, 3, 3, 0]

where the first one is a series of coordinates, and the second one is a series of values corresponding to the coordinates, e.g. coordinate '2' corresponds to the value '1', coords '0' gives value '9'.

Now, I would like to sort coords but keep the order of value unchanged, such that the smallest coords element corresponds to the smallest element in value, and so on. The desired output would be:

coords_new = [1, 4, 2, 3, 0]
value = [1, 9, 3, 3, 0] # unchanged

where '0' -> '0', '1' -> '1', '2' -> '3', '3' -> '3', '4' -> '9'. Any ideas to do that? You can return coords_new, or the indices that reorders the coords as answer.

Edit: If possible, I prefer we can return the indices that reorders the original coords, i.e. return the idx such that coords[idx] = coords_new.

Thanks a lot!

Zhihao

  • Just use np.argsort to generate the sorting indices. – anishtain4 Sep 14 at 19:55
  • Well, I don't think the np.argsort can directly get the desired output... Any ideas? – Zhihao Cui Sep 14 at 20:01
  • In my case, the coords should be unique. But if you can get a solution of general case that would be better. – Zhihao Cui Sep 14 at 20:03
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here are one and a half solutions using argsort. The kind='mergesort' kwd argument is only necessary if you require a stable sort. In your example, an unstable sort may also yield coords_new == [1, 4, 3, 2, 0]. If that is not a problem you can omit the kwd arg and allow numpy to use a faster sort algorithm.

import numpy as np

coords = [2, 0, 1, 4, 3]
value = [1, 9, 3, 3, 0]

coords, value = map(np.asanyarray, (coords, value))

vidx = value.argsort(kind='mergesort') # mergesort is stable, i.e. it  
                                       # preserves the order of equal elements

# direct method:
coords_new = np.empty_like(coords)
coords_new[vidx] = np.sort(coords)

# method yielding idx
idx = np.empty_like(vidx)
idx[vidx] = coords.argsort(kind='mergesort') 

The second method yields idx such that coords_new == coords[idx].

  • Thanks, this one looks an good answer. – Zhihao Cui Sep 16 at 17:13

One alternative is to first create the mapping between the objects and then use this mapping combined with index:

coords = [2, 0, 1, 4, 3]
value = [1, 9, 3, 3, 0]

table = {k: v for k, v in zip(sorted(coords), sorted(value))}
print(table)
print(sorted(coords, key=lambda e: value.index(table[e])))

Output

{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 3, 3: 3, 4: 9}
[1, 4, 2, 3, 0]

Note

This method assumes coords only contains unique values. For the general case you could generate the pairs (c, v) of the mapping an sort by the index value of v in value:

pairs = [(k, v) for k, v in zip(sorted(coords), sorted(value))]
result = [k for k, _ in sorted(pairs, key=lambda e: value.index(e[1]))]

print(result)

Output

[1, 4, 2, 3, 0]
  • Thanks for your answer! Is there a way to get the indices idx which reorders the coords to the new one? i.e. we can get coords_new from coords[idx]. – Zhihao Cui Sep 14 at 20:23
  • You could use the index function on the new list. – Daniel Mesejo Sep 14 at 20:26
  • Look at Rearrange columns of numpy 2D array for the permutation bit. – wim Sep 14 at 20:33

I'm assuming you want a numpy answer since you've tagged numpy:

>>> x = np.argsort(value)
>>> x[x]
array([1, 4, 2, 3, 0])
  • Thanks for your answer. It seems good. But is there a way not return coords_new but directly return idx such that coords[idx] = coords_new? – Zhihao Cui Sep 14 at 21:45
  • Yes, but perhaps you should edit the question, including the expected result, so that the difference is clearer. It's not good to use an example data where it looks the same either way, that's just unnecessarily confusing. – wim Sep 14 at 22:20
  • After you have edited the question, I will post a solution for the idx. – wim Sep 14 at 22:27

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