I have a struct containing a 2D array:

struct Block;

struct World {
    blocks: [[Block; 10]; 10],
}

How could I write a function which returns an iterator over a 2D array, but with the enumeration indices included?

fn enumerate_blocks(&self) -> impl Iterator<Item = (usize, usize, &Block)>

I managed to write an implementation of the function which just returns an iterator without enumeration indices:

fn blocks(&self) -> impl Iterator<Item = &Block> {
    self.blocks.iter().flat_map(|x| x.iter())
}

If I call Iterator::enumerate once, I will get an iterator over (usize, [B; 10])s. What I can do next to get an iterator over (usize, usize, B)s?

I know I could make the function return a custom struct then implement Iterator, like image does, but ideally I would like to avoid this.

  • 2
    This appears fairly low effort... searching the Rust docs for enumerate points to Iterator::enumerate which seems to be about 95% of what you are asking. Assuming you did that research, what problems did you have when trying to use it? – Shepmaster Sep 14 at 22:27
  • The problem is I want to enumerate over a 2D array [[B; 10]; 10]. Or rather, return an iterator which can iterate over a 2D array. If I call enumerate once, I will get an iterator over (usize, [B; 10])s. My question is what I can do next to get an iterator over (usize, usize, B)s. – James Hinshelwood Sep 14 at 22:33
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I call Iterator::enumerate once, I will get an iterator over (usize, [B; 10])s. What I can do next to get an iterator over (usize, usize, B)s?

Call Iterator::enumerate on the inner array in the same way, continuing to use Iterator::flat_map to combine them. Use Iterator::map to add the outer index to the inner tuple.

#[derive(Debug, Default)]
struct Block;

#[derive(Debug, Default)]
struct World {
    blocks: [[Block; 2]; 3],
}

impl World {
    fn blocks(&self) -> impl Iterator<Item = (usize, usize, &Block)> {
        self.blocks
            .iter()
            .enumerate()
            .flat_map(|(x, v)| v.iter().enumerate().map(move |(y, v)| (x, y, v)))
    }
}

fn main() {
    let w = World::default();
    for (x, y, v) in w.blocks() {
        println!("{}, {}, {:?}", x, y, v)
    }
}
0, 0, Block
0, 1, Block
1, 0, Block
1, 1, Block
2, 0, Block
2, 1, Block
  • Great, thank you. This works perfectly for me. Could you possibly explain why move is needed? – James Hinshelwood Sep 14 at 23:21
  • @JamesHinshelwood without it, the compiler assumes you want to place a reference to x in the tuple, instead of copying the value. – Shepmaster Sep 15 at 1:40

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