I used the following code to do the Chi Square Analysis for all possible combinations of columns.

Dat <- esoph[ , 1:3]

library(plyr)

combos <- combn(ncol(Dat),2)

adply(combos, 2, function(x) {
  test <- chisq.test(Dat[, x[1]], Dat[, x[2]])

  out <- data.frame("Row" = colnames(Dat)[x[1]]
                    , "Column" = colnames(Dat[x[2]])
                    , "Chi.Square" = round(test$statistic,3)
                    ,  "df"= test$parameter
                    ,  "p.value" = round(test$p.value, 3)
  )
  return(out)

})  

  X1   Row Column Chi.Square df p.value
1  1 agegp  alcgp      1.419 15       1
2  2 agegp  tobgp      2.400 15       1
3  3 alcgp  tobgp      0.619  9       1

I wonder how the same can be performed with tidyverse. Any hints.

  • Any particular reason your almost base solution is not up to <imaginary> standards? – Roman Luštrik Sep 15 at 7:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted
Dat <- esoph[, 1:3]

library(tidyverse)
library(broom)

data.frame(t(combn(names(Dat),2)), stringsAsFactors = F) %>%
  mutate(d = map2(X1, X2, ~tidy(chisq.test(Dat[,.x], Dat[,.y])))) %>%
  unnest()

#      X1    X2 statistic   p.value parameter                     method
# 1 agegp alcgp 1.4189096 0.9999971        15 Pearson's Chi-squared test
# 2 agegp tobgp 2.4000000 0.9999022        15 Pearson's Chi-squared test
# 3 alcgp tobgp 0.6194617 0.9999240         9 Pearson's Chi-squared test

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.