17

I am new to VueJs and I am working on a form that I want to enable the Save button only when a change occurs at the model.

My initial thought is to compute a dirty function comparing the initial model with the current.

Note: This code is not tested, it's here just for an example.

var app = new Vue({
    el: '#app',
    data: {a:0, b:'', c:{c1:null, c2:0, c3:'test'}},
    initialData: null,
    mounted():{ initialData = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(data));},
    computed: {
        isDirty: function () {
          return JSON.stringify(data) === JSON.stringify(initialData) 
        }
    }
});

Is there a better way of doing this or is there any improvement you could suggest on the above-mentioned code?

6
  • Vuelidate is a convenient way to integrate dirty checking into your app. Vue doesn't offer much out-of-the-box in this regard afaik. Your method works as well but you should probably make use of deep comparison rather than serializing and comparing strings (lodash for example has a lodash.isEqual() which is helpful for that).
    – FK82
    Commented Sep 15, 2018 at 8:52
  • This is the approach I've followed for Angular and Vue applications without fail. It affords you unlimited freedom, I feel. As others noted, JSON stringifying/parsing can have a few limitations but even these can be overcome one at a time or through checking specific fields as/if needed. The only change I'd add is to negate the comparison in the sample code, though you did note that the code was not tested.
    – Draghon
    Commented Jan 7, 2021 at 16:57
  • @Draghon JSON.stringify has might fail if some members are missing or are having different order. It's better to use a deepEqual function Commented Jan 8, 2021 at 17:22
  • Have you found a good solution yet without package?
    – Dgloria
    Commented May 16, 2022 at 17:30
  • 1
    @Dgloria Do you mean about the object compare? Check the answer's comments. I keep a copy from the initial data, and I use stringify for comparison (I only have primitive data types) Commented May 17, 2022 at 9:35

2 Answers 2

17

You can use the deep option of watch as shown in the manual

var app = new Vue({
el: '#app',
data: 
{
  model:
  {
    a:0, 
    b:'', 
    c:
    {
      c1:null, 
      c2:0, 
      c3:'test'
    }
  },
  dirty: false
},
watch:
{
  model:
  {
    handler(newVal, oldVal)
    {
      this.dirty = true;
    },
    deep: true
  }
}
});
7
  • 3
    Thank you for your answer but I want to test if the model differs from the initial model. If someone change a value and then change it back then the model is not dirty Commented Sep 15, 2018 at 16:10
  • 1
    Then you’ll need to keep a copy of the loaded model and compare it to the model updated by user in its watcher so you can update the dirty attribute... Commented Sep 15, 2018 at 18:42
  • 1
    If your data model contains only primitive data types (Number, String, Boolean, Null) - then you can get away with your initial thought. However, if your data model contains Dates, Regexes, Infinity, NaN, cyclic references - then JSON.stringify will choke on them and either produce wrong result or completely fail (e.g. with cyclic references). In such case you will have to use something like deValue (github.com/Rich-Harris/devalue) or JSON-dry (github.com/skerit/json-dry)
    – IVO GELOV
    Commented Sep 16, 2018 at 9:31
  • 1
    You can remove the watcher and attach a @blur or @change event handler instead.
    – IVO GELOV
    Commented Mar 11, 2020 at 15:29
  • 1
    This mostly worked for me, but dirty was always true, because the watch triggered every time I switched to a new record. replacing this.dirty = true; with this.dirty = oldVal.id == newVal.id ? true : false; fixed the issue.
    – Nat
    Commented Apr 1, 2020 at 17:12
5

Borrowing from -- > https://stackoverflow.com/a/48579303/4050261

You can bind single onchange event on the parent container and benefit from the fact that change events bubble:

<div class="container" @change="someThingChanged()">
  <input v-model="foo">
  <input v-model="bar">
  ... etc.
</div>
2
  • 2
    Thank you for your answer but I find deep watcher much more clean solution. This is because it's self contained in Vue object and not depending on Template code, any migration to Vuex would be much easier if used watch deep. Commented Mar 25, 2020 at 8:37
  • This only works for certain type of components, try mixing radios, switch, textarea etc and soon you'll see some of these are not tracked.
    – code4jhon
    Commented Jun 30, 2022 at 16:31

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