I'm working with a camera that generates a 120x160 image which I want to save as a BMP file.

my problem with the code I am using is in the number of bits per pixel since the pixels that the camera delivers are 2 bytes (bitmap [28] = 16) but when I open the image it tells me that the format is the wrong one , the strange thing is that if I put 1 byte (bitmap [28] = 8) I get the correct image but with distortions of colors a bit strange, I have no idea what is wrong, I hope someone can help me see my error and achieve to learn from him.

int noColor=256,end_color=54+4*noColor;
static unsigned char temp=0;
// -- FILE HEADER -- //

// bitmap signature
bitmap[0] = 'B';
bitmap[1] = 'M';

// file size
bitmap[2] = 0x36; // 40 + 14 + 256*4+(120x160)
bitmap[3] = 0x4F;
bitmap[4] = 0x00;
bitmap[5] = 0;

// reserved field (in hex. 00 00 00 00)
for( i = 6; i < 10; i++) bitmap[i] = 0;

// offset of pixel data inside the image
//The offset, i.e. starting address, of the byte where the bitmap image data (pixel array) can be found.
//here 1078
bitmap[10]=0x36;
bitmap[11]=0x04;
for( i = 12; i < 14; i++) bitmap[i] = 0;


// -- BITMAP HEADER -- //

// header size
bitmap[14] = 40;
for( i = 15; i < 18; i++) bitmap[i] = 0;

// width of the image
bitmap[18] = 160;
for( i = 19; i < 22; i++) bitmap[i] = 0;

// height of the image
bitmap[22] = 120;
for( i = 23; i < 26; i++) bitmap[i] = 0;

// no of color planes, must be 1
bitmap[26] = 1;
bitmap[27] = 0;

// number of bits per pixel
bitmap[28] =16; // 2 byte
bitmap[29] = 0;

// compression method (no compression here)
for( i = 30; i < 34; i++) bitmap[i] = 0;

// size of pixel data
bitmap[34] = 0x00; // (120*160) bytes => 19200 pixels--->0x4B00
bitmap[35] = 0x4B;//0x4B
bitmap[36] = 0x00;
bitmap[37] = 0;

// horizontal resolution of the image - pixels per meter (2835)
bitmap[38] = 0;
bitmap[39] = 0;
bitmap[40] = 0;
bitmap[41] = 0;

// vertical resolution of the image - pixels per meter (2835)
bitmap[42] = 0;
bitmap[43] = 0;
bitmap[44] = 0;
bitmap[45] = 0;

// color palette information here 256
bitmap[46]=0;
bitmap[47]=0;
for( i = 48; i < 50; i++) bitmap[i] = 0;

// number of important colors
// if 0 then all colors are important
for( i = 50; i < 54; i++) bitmap[i] = 0;

//Color Palette
//for less then or equal to 8 bit BMP Image we have to create a 4*noofcolor size color palette which is nothing but
//[BLUE][GREEN][RED][ZERO] values
//for 8 bit we have the following code
for (i=54;i<end_color;i+=4)
{
    bitmap[i]=temp;
    bitmap[i+1]=temp;
    bitmap[i+2]=temp;
    bitmap[i+3]=0;
    temp=(temp+1);
}

// -- PIXEL DATA -- //
a=19199;
    for( i = end_color; i < end_color+19200; i++){bitmap[i] = pixel_1[a]; a=a-1;}

FILE *file;

//use wb+ when writing to binary file .i.e. in binary form whereas w+ for txt file.
file = fopen("AAA.bmp", "wb+");
for( i = 0; i < 20278; i++)
{
    fputc(bitmap[i], file);
}
fclose(file);
  • Isn't the arithmetic on the 10th line showing that each pixel is expected to be 1 byte? – Robert Prévost Sep 16 at 3:40
  • I have calculated it again, but the results are still not optimal. – fff Sep 16 at 21:59

If you want a 16 bits per pixel image in the end, the image data size is 160*120*2 (38400), not 19200.

You have to adjust de file size in consequence of course.

EDIT: since pixel_1 is an array of 16 bits data, you can change the loop which copies it into bitmap to:

a = 19199;
for (i = end_color; i < end_color + 19200; i++)
{
    *(short *)(bitmap + (i * 2)) = pixel_1[a];
    a = a - 1;
}
  • If I do what you say, I no longer have problems with the format, but the image is not optimal yet, in fact, the top half is completely black and the other half looks like noise, do you have any idea what it is? thanks for your help. – fff Sep 16 at 21:23
  • With the code you gave, if you have a better image with a 8 bits BMP and if half of the image is black in 16 bits, it means that the data source (pixel_1) is probably 8 bits data, not 16 bits. Or maybe there's a pixel_2 for the second pixel byte ? – Joël Hecht Sep 17 at 6:06
  • The data that is in the variable pixel_1 is a vector of 19200 spaces, for example, pixel_1 [1] = 0x6fce, this is a pixel, that is why I say that there are 16 bits in a 1 pixel – fff Sep 18 at 1:40
  • Very smart solution, I had not thought about it, but the image is still wrong, it is in blue tones and the original is in gray scale, the problem must be elsewhere, thanks for the help. – fff Sep 20 at 17:46

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