9

enter image description here

https://8thlight.com/blog/uncle-bob/2012/08/13/the-clean-architecture.html

I have some question about this pattern. The Database is at outter Layer but how would that work in reality? For example if i have a Microservices that just manges this entity:

person{
  id,
  name,
  age
}

And one of the use cases would be manage Persons. Manage Persons is saving / retrieving / .. Persons (=> CRUD operations), but to do this the Usecase needs to talk to a database. But that would be a violation of the Dependency rule

The overriding rule that makes this architecture work is The Dependency Rule. This rule says that source code dependencies can only point inwards.

  1. Would this even be a valid use case?
  2. how can i access the database if its at the outter layer? (Dependency Iversion?)

If i get a GET /person/{id} Request should my Microservices process it like this?

enter image description here

But using Dependency Inversion would be a Violation of

Nothing in an inner circle can know anything at all about something in an outer circle. In particular, the name of something declared in an outer circle must not be mentioned by the code in an inner circle. That includes, functions, classes. variables, or any other named software entity.


Crossing boundaries. At the lower right of the diagram is an example of how we cross the circle boundaries. It shows the Controllers and Presenters communicating with the Use Cases in the next layer. Note the flow of control. It begins in the controller, moves through the use case, and then winds up executing in the presenter. Note also the source code dependencies. Each one of them points inwards towards the use cases.

We usually resolve this apparent contradiction by using the Dependency Inversion Principle. In a language like Java, for example, we would arrange interfaces and inheritance relationships such that the source code dependencies oppose the flow of control at just the right points across the boundary.

For example, consider that the use case needs to call the presenter. However, this call must not be direct because that would violate The Dependency Rule: No name in an outer circle can be mentioned by an inner circle. So we have the use case call an interface (Shown here as Use Case Output Port) in the inner circle, and have the presenter in the outer circle implement it.

The same technique is used to cross all the boundaries in the architectures. We take advantage of dynamic polymorphism to create source code dependencies that oppose the flow of control so that we can conform to The Dependency Rule no matter what direction the flow of control is going in.

Should the Use Case layer Declare an Repository Interface which will be implemented by the DB Package (Frameworks & Drivers Layer)

enter image description here

If the Server recieves a GET /persons/1 Request the PersonRest would create a PersonRepository and would pass this Repository + the ID to the ManagePerson::getPerson Function, getPerson doesnt know PersonRepository but knows the interface it implements so its doesnt violate any rules right? ManagePerson::getPerson would use that Repository to look for the entity and would return a Person Entity to PersonRest::get which would return a Json Objekt to the Client right?

English is sadly not my native language so i hope you guys can let me know if i understood the pattern correct and maybe answer some of my questions.

Ty in advance

5

The Database is at outter Layer but how would that work in reality?

You create a technology independent interface in the gateway layer and implement it in the db layer. E.g.

public interface OrderRepository {
    public List<Order> findByCustomer(Customer customer);
}

implementation is in the db layer

public class HibernateOrderRepository implements OrderRepository {
      ...
}

At runtime the inner layers get injected with the outer layers implementations. But you don't have a source code dependency.

You can see this by scanning your import statements.

And one of the use cases would be manage Persons. Manage Persons is saving / retrieving / .. Persons (=> CRUD operations), but to do this the Usecase needs to talk to a database. But that would be a violation of the Dependency rule

No, that would not violate the dependency rule, because the use cases define the interface they need. The db just implements it.

If you manage your application dependencies with maven you will see that the db jar module depends on the use cases not vice versa. But it would be even better to extract these use cases interface into an own module.

Then the module dependencies would look like this

+-----+      +---------------+     +-----------+
|  db | -->  | use-cases-api | <-- | use cases |
+-----+      +---------------+     +-----------+

that's the inversion of dependencies that would otherwise look like this

+-----+      +-----------+
|  db | <--  | use cases |
+-----+      +-----------+

If i get a GET /person/{id} Request should my Microservices process it like this? enter image description here

Yes that would be a violation, because web layer accesses the db layer. A better approach is that the web layer accesses the controller layer, which accesses the use case layer and so on.

To keep the dependency inversion you must decouple the layers using interfaces like I showed above.

So if you want to pass data to an inner layer you must introduce an interface in the inner layer that defines methods to get the data it needs and implement it in the outer layer.

In the controller layer you will specify an interface like this

public interface ControllerParams {
    public Long getPersonId();
}

in the web layer you might implement your service like this

@Path("/person")
public PersonRestService {

    // Maybe injected using @Autowired if you are using spring
    private SomeController someController;

    @Get
    @Path("{id}")
    public void getPerson(PathParam("id") String id){
       try {
           Long personId = Long.valueOf(id);

           someController.someMethod(new ControllerParams(){
                public Long getPersonId(){
                    return personId;
                }
           });
       } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
           // handle it
       }
    }
}

At the first sight it seems to be boilerplate code. But keep in mind that you can let the rest framework deserialize the request into a java object. And this object might implement ControllerParams instead.

If you consequently follow the dependency inversion rule and the clean architecture you will never see an import statement of a outer layer's class in an inner layer.

The purpose of the clean architecture is that the main business classes do not depend on any technology or environment. Since the dependencies point from outer to inner layers, the only reason for an outer layer to change is because of inner layer changes. Or if you exchange the outer layer's implementation technology. E.g. Rest -> SOAP

So why should we do this effort?

Robert C. Martin tells it in chapter 5 Object-Oriented Programming. At the end in the section dependency inversion he says:

With this approach, software architects working in systems written in OO languages have absolute control over the direction of all source code dependencies in the system. Thay are not constrained to align those dependencies with the flow of control. No matter which module does the calling and which module is called, the software architect can point the source code dependency in either diraction.

That is power!

I guess developers are often confused about the control flow and the source code dependency. The control flow usually remains the same, but the source code dependencies are inversed. This gives us the chance to create plug-in architectures. Each interface is a point to plug in. So it can be exchanged, e.g. for technical or testing reasons.

EDIT

gateway layer = interface OrderRepository => shouldnt the OrderRepository-Interface be inside of UseCases because i need to use the crud operations on that level?

I think that it is ok to move the OrderRepository into the use case layer. Another option would be to use the use case's input and output ports. The use case's input port might have repository-like methods, e.g. findOrderById, and adapts this to the OrderRepository. For persistence it can use methods that you define in the output port.

public interface UseCaseInputPort {
    public Order findOrderById(Long id);
}

public interface UseCaseOutputPort {
    public void save(Order order);
}

The difference to just using a OrderRepository is that the use case ports only contain use case specific repository methods. Thus they only change if the use case changes. So they have a single responsibility and you honored the interface segregation principle.

  • thank you @RenéLink for your answer :) gateway layer = interface OrderRepository => shouldnt the OrderRepository-Interface be inside of UseCases because i need to use the crud operations on that level? – Barney Stinson Sep 16 '18 at 16:34
2

The key element is Dependency Inversion. None of the inner layers should have dependencies to the outer layers. So, if for example the Use Case layer needs to call a database repository then you must define a repository interface (just an interface, without any implementation) inside the Use Case layer and put its implementation in the Interface Adapters layer.

  • hello, first of all thanks for your answer! what would i put inside of the db package inside the framework & drivers layer? – Barney Stinson Sep 16 '18 at 10:24
  • 1
    @BarneyStinson for example the implementation of the database repositories interfaces – Adam Siemion Sep 16 '18 at 10:29
  • gateways (interface adapter layer) & db (frameworks & drivers) => if im using java spring i shouild put the repository inside db because its a framework and i dont have to code a single line if im not using a framework and i use jdbc for example i put it inside the interface adapter layer!? i dont really understand the difference between db & gateway – Barney Stinson Sep 16 '18 at 10:34

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