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I am wondering what the options are for destroying a structure created via defstruct in Common Lisp. It appears that a constructor is automatically provided; however, that it is not the case for a destructor.

What are the ways one can "clear" a structure from memory? Things like (setq my-struct NIL) come to mind, but I am unsure whether this is the cleanest way to do this?

Edit:

The question arose when I was trying to test what happens if I keyed something into a hashtable using a structure as the key and then destroyed that structure. What would happen to the key in the hashtable? I guess this is more of a question on how hashtables are implemented.

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    Why do you care? GC will do it for you when you no longer use it. – sds Sep 17 '18 at 19:50
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    Make sure you use local variables rather than global variables to hold temporary objects. Garbage collection will reclaim the memory when the variable's scope ends. – Barmar Sep 17 '18 at 20:06
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    This is similar to JavaScript, PHP, Python, and Ruby. You don't have to manage memory manually, like you do in C or C++. – Barmar Sep 17 '18 at 20:07
  • I understand all that. The question arose when I was trying to test what happens if I keyed something into a hashtable using a structure as the key and then destroyed that structure. What would happen to the key in the hashtable? I guess this is more of a question on how hashtables are implemented. – MadPhysicist Sep 17 '18 at 20:52
  • @MadPhysicist can you please add this comment as part of your question? – rsm Sep 17 '18 at 21:30
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Since Common Lisp is a dynamic language, Garbage Collector will remove structure from memory when it's no longer in use (referenced anywhere). So yes, when you assign a name to a structure (ie my-struct) and then assign nil to this name, structure will be removed from memory.

When you use this structure also as a key, it has one reference more, so even when you assign nil to my-struct, structure will remain in memory until you remove it from the hash table.

It's worth noting, that make-hash-table takes also optional test argument:

test---a designator for one of the functions eq, eql, equal, or equalp. The default is eql. http://www.lispworks.com/documentation/HyperSpec/Body/f_mk_has.htm

When you use structures as keys, you should set test to equalp.

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    When you use structures as keys, you should set test to equalp unless you want to compare by eq of course (which there are valid cases for) – Baggers Sep 18 '18 at 13:11
  • Or until the hash-table is no longer reachable. Most lisp implementations will be able to clear up unreachable, but still (due to circular references, referenced) data. Some won't. Exact behaviour is seen as a quality-of-implementation thing. – Vatine Dec 21 '18 at 8:22
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There is no way for a user to 'clear' an object from memory. To free the memory and 'clear' it is the purpose of the Garbage Collector.

One may be able to use a non-standard mechanism of finalizers, which allows one to schedule actions when a garbage collector is about to destroy an object.

See 'finalize' in something like Trivial Garbage

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