9

While doing a deep dive on array methods, I decided to take a look at the steps involved in the Array.sort method. Take a look at this code to reverse the order of an array in place:

let arr = [];

for (let i = 1; i < 6; i++) {
  arr.push(i);
}

arr.sort((value1, value2) => {
  console.log(arr);
  console.log(`Comparing ${value1} : ${value2}`);
  return value2 - value1;
});

console.log(arr);

I get this output:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
Comparing 1 : 2
[2, 1, 3, 4, 5]
Comparing 1 : 3
[2, 1, 1, 4, 5]
Comparing 2 : 3
[3, 2, 1, 4, 5]
Comparing 1 : 4
[3, 2, 1, 1, 5]
Comparing 2 : 4
[3, 2, 2, 1, 5]
Comparing 3 : 4
[4, 3, 2, 1, 5]
Comparing 1 : 5
[4, 3, 2, 1, 1]
Comparing 2 : 5
[4, 3, 2, 2, 1]
Comparing 3 : 5
[4, 3, 3, 2, 1]
Comparing 4 : 5
[5, 4, 3, 2, 1]

The first two steps make sense, but look at the third: [2, 1, 1, 4, 5].

Why would this be the behavior when I would expect [2, 3, 1, 4, 5]?

As you can see down the line, this repeated digit phenomenon shows up again and again until the array is finally reversed. What am I missing? It's clearly keeping a copy of the array after each mutation somewhere that isn't in arr.

  • 7
    You've defined a predicate that doesn't uphold the contract, so it's not entirely surprising you get weird behaviour. – Oliver Charlesworth Sep 17 '18 at 19:45
  • This might reverse the array out of sheer luck, but is not guaranteed to do anything. Don't use inconsistent comparison functions! – Bergi Sep 17 '18 at 19:48
  • @OliverCharlesworth This also seems to happen with a comparison that upholds the contract (e.g. value2 - value1). So, you could say it is a little surprising. – FK82 Sep 17 '18 at 20:06
  • @Bergi Rather than "sheer luck" it seems to be a difference in sorting algorithm the gives incorrect results once you get above a certain number of characters in an array (see Mark's comment). Below that it's pretty consistent (I haven't found a non-working example), and the question is about the array value carried through the iterations. – sadq3377 Sep 17 '18 at 20:08
  • 1
    it seems to be a difference in sorting algorithm the gives incorrect results well, yeah. And it'd be a sheer luck which one would you be using. You could be testing with one browser or even one dataset where you get the exact result you expect. Yet that can change tomorrow or, worse yet, in a year's time long after you've forgotten that piece of code. For the record on Chrome you get your result (reverse sorting) with datasets of up to 10 elements. If you have an array with 11 elements or more, the browser uses a different sorting algorithm and you get random order. – VLAZ Sep 17 '18 at 20:20
3

When arrays are small browsers (well...at least chrome and safari and node) use insertion sort. The behavior you are seeing is the result of looking at the array in the middle of the insertion sort loop. You can reproduce it with:

let arr = [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

function InsertionSort(a, comparefn) {
    let from = 0
    let to = a.length
    for (var i = from + 1; i < to; i++) {
      var element = a[i];
      for (var j = i - 1; j >= from; j--) {
        var tmp = a[j];
        var order = comparefn(tmp, element); //<-- your console.log is peaking at the array here
        if (order > 0) {
          a[j + 1] = tmp;
        } else {
          break;
        }
      }
      a[j + 1] = element;
    }
  };

InsertionSort(arr,  (a,b) => {
    console.log(arr.join(","))
    return b-a
})
console.log(arr)

Just keep in mind that this is not a required implementation so you shouldn't necessarily count on this behavior.

  • Perfect, thank you for this answer. That makes a lot of sense. – sadq3377 Sep 17 '18 at 21:01
1

To add to @mark-meyer answer. There is no specification for browsers on how to compare numbers based on callback provided to sort method.

For example, Array.sort() is used sometimes to uniformly randomize array with:

var shuffledArr = arr.sort(() => (Math.random() - 0.5))

In this case

If comparefn is not undefined and is not a consistent comparison function for the elements of this array (see below), the sort order is implementation-defined.

https://www.ecma-international.org/ecma-262/6.0/#sec-array.prototype.sort

You can check this page to see randomization results inside your browser: http://siri0n.github.io/attic/shuffle-comparison/index.html. Compare Chrome and Firefox. More than this, Firefox would choose different sorting algorithms for different field sizes. Not the answer, but I hope an interesting addition to the question.

0

Thanks for interesting question that opened a surprise.

There is side effect/consequence: if exception happened inside of comparator callback array could be broken(not just sorted partially):

let a = [1, 3, 2, 6, 4];
let stepToFail = 2;
try { 
   a.sort((x1, x2) => {
     if (!stepToFail--) throw "test"; 
     return x1 - x2;
   }); 
} catch(e) {
   // shows [1,3,3,6,4] in Chrome; data is broken and cannot be used anymore
   console.log(JSON.stringify(a)); 
}

[UPD] I reported a bug into Chromium project and it has been closed as "won't fix"

Array.prototype.sort was re-implemented in Chrome 70.0.3533. That is the reason why there is a change in behavior.

Regardless of that change, the above example does not really constitute a bug. The comparison function is not "consistent" and as per spec the resulting sort-order is implementation-defined. That includes "inconsistent state" since the exception can be thrown while looking for the right place to put a value or before it can be written back.

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