1

My entity classes:

public class Unit
{
    [Key]
    [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
    public int? UnitID { get; set; }

    public string Name { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public int? ManufacturerID { get; set; }

    // More fields

    public Manufacturer Manufacturer { get; set; }
}

public class Manufacturer
{
    [Key]
    [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
    public int? ManufacturerID { get; set; }

    public string Name { get; set; }
}

My query:

        return await DbContext.Unit.AsNoTracking().Include(r => r.Manufacturer)
                .Select(r => new
                {
                    UnitID = r.UnitID,
                    UnitName = r.Name,
                    ManufacturerName = r.Manufacturer.Name // Using Manufacturer
                }).ToListAsync();

The warning message:

...|WARN|Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Query|The Include operation for navigation '[r].Manufacturer' is unnecessary and was ignored because the navigation is not reachable in the final query results. See https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=850303 for more information...

I am using Manufacturer.name in new anonymous so It means navigation [r].Manufacturer must be used.

Why Entity Framework Core warns the message? Is am doing wrong? Thanks!

6
  • it works? I mean, it gives you the Manufacturer's name in the returning list?
    – Romias
    Sep 17, 2018 at 20:09
  • 3
    I am using Manufacturer.name in new anonymous so It means navigation [r].Manufacturer must be used. Wrong. You only need the include when you want the property and it's NOT within the select lambda. Once you access any nav property int he select, the includes are ignored. You should just read the link in the exception, it explains it all
    – Tseng
    Sep 17, 2018 at 20:09
  • @Tseng: Does it means [r].Manufacturer will be loaded by default because I am using it in new anonymous? No need Include(r => r.Manufacturer)?
    – LHA
    Sep 17, 2018 at 20:14
  • @Loc: Exactly, thats what the warning and the docs also tells you :)
    – Tseng
    Sep 17, 2018 at 20:14
  • 2
    When you do a projection (.Select statement which returns a non-entity type), the original entity won't be used and only the navigation properties used within it are really required. It would otherwise lead to bad performance to do additional joins (thats usually what happens on include) for non used nav properties
    – Tseng
    Sep 17, 2018 at 20:16

1 Answer 1

15

This is actually a common misconception about what Entity Framework’s Include actually does. It actually does not affect the filtering at all but is only relevant when the result is materialized.

When you do something.Include(x => x.Prop) then what you are actually telling Entity Framework is this: When there is an entity of the type of something in the result, then also include the entity that is reachable by the navigation property Prop.

For example, following the usual blogs & posts example that the EF Core documentation uses, context.Blogs.Include(blog => blog.Posts) will load the Blog entities and include the related Posts for each Blog entity. But this matters only if you actually select Blog entities in the result.

context.Blogs
    .Select(blog => new {
        Id = blog.BlogId,
        Url = blog.Url,
    });

This query for example does not produce any Blog entities, so includes on the Blog entity would be ignored. You could also expand this query to also include information about the posts, without actually having to include the Posts navigation property on the Blog entity. Since there’s no Blog entity in the result, that wouldn’t have any effect:

context.Blogs
    .Select(blog => new {
        Id = blog.BlogId,
        Url = blog.Url,
        PostCount = blog.Posts.Count(),
    });

Note that not including a navigational property does not prevent you from using it to filter something:

context.Blogs
    .Where(blog => blog.Posts.Any(post => title == "Foo"));

This would select all Blog entities that contained a post with a title “Foo”; but the Posts navigation property wouldn’t be loaded since it wasn’t included in the query. But you can still filter by it.


So .Include() will only affect the result of the query, and only if there is an actual entity of that type being produced. It is however not necessary to include something just to filter by it.

In your particular example, since there isn’t any Unit entity in the result, the inclusion of Unit.Manufacturer has no effect. And in order to add the Unit.Manufacturer.Name to the result, you do not need to include the navigation property.

5
  • 1
    Awesome, very well explained
    – lets do it
    Sep 18, 2018 at 4:46
  • how would I go about Including the PostCount in your example in the same query? currently your code produces n+1 sql queries?
    – kkica
    Aug 10, 2021 at 11:55
  • @KristjanKica Which example are you referring to exactly? The second example, which has the blog.Posts.Count(), should give you all blogs and their post counts in a single query.
    – poke
    Aug 10, 2021 at 12:15
  • Yes, I have a similar case, but I am passing an Expression<Func<Entity, DTO>> to the select statement insted of the lambda. The result is multiple queries for the navigation property. EF core 2.2.6
    – kkica
    Aug 10, 2021 at 12:42
  • @poke looks like its a EF core 2 feature that related entities are retrieved in a separate query, however without materializing the query before Select(), every related entity is lazy loaded. So with query.ToList().AsQuerable().Select(expression) there are 2 get statements, but with query.Select(expression) there are n+1 sql statements (n is number of parent records)
    – kkica
    Aug 10, 2021 at 14:54

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