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How can I return a list of all intermediate seconds? For example for "10:10:10" and "15:15:15" return: ["10:10:10", "10:10:11", ... "15:15:14", "15:15:15"]

do I have to use the datatime module and do an accountant?

Looking in the python documentation I can not find the desired result. What can you recommend?

  • Use str.split to find how many hours, minutes, and seconds are in your start and finish times. Then loop, adding one second and recalculating when you go over 60 minutes or seconds each time. Then stop looping after you get to the same hours, minutes, and seconds as your finish time. – Ruzihm Sep 17 '18 at 22:34
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You can write a generator that is similar to range:

import datetime as dt

def time_range(t0,tn,t_inc=1):
   def add_secs_to_time(timeval, secs_to_add):
      dummy_date = dt.date(1, 1, 1)
      full_datetime = dt.datetime.combine(dummy_date, timeval)
      added_datetime = full_datetime + dt.timedelta(seconds=secs_to_add)
      return added_datetime.time()

   t=t0
   yield t
   while t<tn:
      t=add_secs_to_time(t,t_inc)
      yield t

Then use like so:

t0=dt.time(*map(int,'10:10:10'.split(':')))
tn=dt.time(*map(int,'15:15:15'.split(':')))
times=time_range(t0,tn) 

>>> list(times)
[datetime.time(10, 10, 10), datetime.time(10, 10, 11), datetime.time(10, 10, 12)...datetime.time(15, 15, 11), datetime.time(15, 15, 12), datetime.time(15, 15, 13), datetime.time(15, 15, 14), datetime.time(15, 15, 15)]

Or, your output:

>>> list(map(str, times))
['10:10:10', '10:10:11', '10:10:12', '10:10:13' ...
'15:15:13', '15:15:14', '15:15:15']
  • your code does not work, could you explain me better please – Jorge Barcos Sep 18 '18 at 17:04
  • Well it does work. HERE is a demo How are you trying to use it? – dawg Sep 18 '18 at 17:11
  • You're right, it works, I'm wrong. I wanted to ask you what do you think about this code .tio.run/##ZZG/TsMwEMb3PMWpqJIjQqWmW6VOMLAgBkbEcI0vcaTEDmeHP6/… – Jorge Barcos Sep 18 '18 at 19:47
  • It seems fine. Does that do what you want it to do? It is different than what you implied in your question. Since you tagged your code Python 3, a generator (rather than returning a list) would be a bit more memory friendly. – dawg Sep 18 '18 at 20:00
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You can use pandas, using the date_range function:

If you want them as datetime objects:

import pandas as pd

pd.date_range("10:10:10","15:15:15", freq='S').time

Which gives you:

array([datetime.time(10, 10, 10), datetime.time(10, 10, 11),
   datetime.time(10, 10, 12), ..., datetime.time(15, 15, 13),
   datetime.time(15, 15, 14), datetime.time(15, 15, 15)], dtype=object)

Or as formatted strings:

pd.date_range("10:10:10","15:15:15", freq='S').strftime('%H:%M:%S')

Giving you:

array(['10:10:10', '10:10:11', '10:10:12', ..., '15:15:13', '15:15:14',
   '15:15:15'], dtype='<U8')

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