173

I have two arrays in PHP as follows:

People:

Array
(
    [0] => 3
    [1] => 20
)

Wanted Criminals:

Array
(
    [0] => 2
    [1] => 4
    [2] => 8
    [3] => 11
    [4] => 12
    [5] => 13
    [6] => 14
    [7] => 15
    [8] => 16
    [9] => 17
    [10] => 18
    [11] => 19
    [12] => 20
)

How do I check if any of the People elements are in the Wanted Criminals array?

In this example, it should return true because 20 is in Wanted Criminals.

8 Answers 8

278

You can use array_intersect().

$peopleContainsCriminal = !empty(array_intersect($people, $criminals));
8
  • 8
    Can't use empty() with anything other than a variable. Sep 25, 2009 at 19:21
  • 5
    From the page you linked to: "Prior to PHP 5.5, empty() only supports variables; anything else will result in a parse error. In other words, the following will not work: empty(trim($name)). Instead, use trim($name) == false." Sep 19, 2013 at 22:31
  • 12
    As mentioned in the comments I found that !empty does not work as expected. Instead, I used count(): !count(array_intersect($people, $criminals));
    – Mattios550
    Nov 30, 2016 at 21:12
  • 5
    Why is this marked as the answer with 65 votes up when it throws Fatal error: Can't use function return value in write context?
    – Dave Heq
    Jan 27, 2017 at 18:02
  • 2
    Using !empty() is unnecessary. Just cast the returned array to a bool data type. $result = (bool) array_intersect(...); No reason to call empty() or count(). An empty array becomes false a non-empty array becomes true. Feb 21, 2022 at 2:16
33

There's little wrong with using array_intersect() and count() (instead of empty).

For example:

$bFound = (count(array_intersect($criminals, $people))) ? true : false;
4
  • 3
    There's nothing wrong with it but count() isn't considered performant (if you care about micro optimization, that is) May 14, 2014 at 21:25
  • The ternary operator is redundant in this code, you can just straight parse it as a bool, by calling (bool) in front of count Aug 6, 2020 at 16:00
  • 4
    Can just do it $bFound = count(array_intersect($criminals, $people)) > 0; Dec 23, 2020 at 1:51
  • Simpler still: $bFound = (bool) array_intersect($criminals, $people); because empty arrays are falsey. Dec 20, 2022 at 22:04
29

That code is invalid as you can only pass variables into language constructs. empty() is a language construct.

You have to do this in two lines:

$result = array_intersect($people, $criminals);
$result = !empty($result);
3
  • The problem is not it is a language construct. The problem is it expects a reference and Greg's passing a value.
    – Artefacto
    Jul 28, 2010 at 15:41
  • 3
    @Artefacto, from the php.net "Note: Because this is a language construct and not a function, it cannot be called using variable functions." It's exactly like Paul said. Sep 19, 2013 at 22:35
  • This answer is misleading. The use of count() or !empty() on the return value of array_intersect() is unnecessary. An empty array evaluates as false; a non-empty array will evaluate to true. Mar 10 at 10:17
28

if 'empty' is not the best choice, what about this:

if (array_intersect($people, $criminals)) {...} //when found

or

if (!array_intersect($people, $criminals)) {...} //when not found
0
22

Performance test for in_array vs array_intersect:

$a1 = array(2,4,8,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20);

$a2 = array(3,20);

$intersect_times = array();
$in_array_times = array();
for($j = 0; $j < 10; $j++)
{
    /***** TEST ONE array_intersect *******/
    $t = microtime(true);
    for($i = 0; $i < 100000; $i++)
    {
        $x = (bool) array_intersect($a1,$a2);
        // $x = array_intersect($a1,$a2);
        // $x = !empty($x);
    }
    $intersect_times[] = microtime(true) - $t;


    /***** TEST TWO in_array *******/
    $t2 = microtime(true);
    for($i = 0; $i < 100000; $i++)
    {
        $x = false;
        foreach($a2 as $v){
            if(in_array($v,$a1))
            {
                $x = true;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    $in_array_times[] = microtime(true) - $t2;
}

echo '<hr><br>'.implode('<br>',$intersect_times).'<br>array_intersect avg: '.(array_sum($intersect_times) / count($intersect_times));
echo '<hr><br>'.implode('<br>',$in_array_times).'<br>in_array avg: '.(array_sum($in_array_times) / count($in_array_times));
exit;

Here are updated results, with "empty" removed (thanks @mickmackusa) using php 8.1.6 on an old android phone:

0.48460602760315
0.48387813568115
0.48307418823242
0.48364686965942
0.48398804664612
0.48381400108337
0.48366618156433
0.48358988761902
0.48365116119385
0.48321080207825
array_intersect avg: 0.48371253013611

0.023025989532471
0.022964954376221
0.023096084594727
0.022902965545654
0.022971868515015
0.022997856140137
0.02297306060791
0.022901058197021
0.022931814193726
0.023001909255981
in_array avg: 0.022976756095886

in_array was at least 5 times faster, ironically it looks 20 times faster with php 8.1, despite removing the empty() function from the array_intersect loop. Note that we "break" as soon as a result is found, but based on test values in $a1 and $a2, it is the very last loop anyways.

4
  • Thanks for the benchmark. So if you know you are handling small arrays it's better to stay with array_intersect(). Nov 2, 2017 at 15:01
  • isset is even faster. And you could use bool val to enable or disable. Also the search values as key make sure to have no duplicates. ´array_intersect avg: 0.52077736854553; in_array avg: 0.015597295761108; isset avg: 0.0077081203460693´
    – cottton
    Jun 18, 2019 at 12:03
  • Its even faster if you use in_array with the strict boolean set. Test averages at 3x faster than without the strict boolean set.
    – omarjebari
    Apr 24, 2021 at 10:39
  • 1
    It is unfair to make the benchmark comparison for array_intersect() also call empty(). empty() is not necessary at all. !array_intersect() is enough to do the job because there is no need to check if $x is declared. Jan 10, 2023 at 21:27
3

You could also use in_array as follows:

<?php
$found = null;
$people = array(3,20,2);
$criminals = array( 2, 4, 8, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20);
foreach($people as $num) {
    if (in_array($num,$criminals)) {
        $found[$num] = true;
    } 
}
var_dump($found);
// array(2) { [20]=> bool(true)   [2]=> bool(true) }

While array_intersect is certainly more convenient to use, it turns out that its not really superior in terms of performance. I created this script too:

<?php
$found = null;
$people = array(3,20,2);
$criminals = array( 2, 4, 8, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20);
$fastfind = array_intersect($people,$criminals);
var_dump($fastfind);
// array(2) { [1]=> int(20)   [2]=> int(2) }

Then, I ran both snippets respectively at: http://3v4l.org/WGhO7/perf#tabs and http://3v4l.org/g1Hnu/perf#tabs and checked the performance of each. The interesting thing is that the total CPU time, i.e. user time + system time is the same for PHP5.6 and the memory also is the same. The total CPU time under PHP5.4 is less for in_array than array_intersect, albeit marginally so.

1
  • The results are deceiving. Running it just one time is too fast to measure any difference. If you have hundreds or thousands of requests per second, those fractions of a second add up quickly, so if you think your application needs to scale, I would stick with the in_array implementation. Dec 7, 2017 at 4:06
2

Here's a way I am doing it after researching it for a while. I wanted to make a Laravel API endpoint that checks if a field is "in use", so the important information is: 1) which DB table? 2) what DB column? and 3) is there a value in that column that matches the search terms?

Knowing this, we can construct our associative array:

$SEARCHABLE_TABLE_COLUMNS = [
    'users' => [ 'email' ],
];

Then, we can set our values that we will check:

$table = 'users';
$column = 'email';
$value = '[email protected]';

Then, we can use array_key_exists() and in_array() with eachother to execute a one, two step combo and then act upon the truthy condition:

// step 1: check if 'users' exists as a key in `$SEARCHABLE_TABLE_COLUMNS`
if (array_key_exists($table, $SEARCHABLE_TABLE_COLUMNS)) {

    // step 2: check if 'email' is in the array: $SEARCHABLE_TABLE_COLUMNS[$table]
    if (in_array($column, $SEARCHABLE_TABLE_COLUMNS[$table])) {

        // if table and column are allowed, return Boolean if value already exists
        // this will either return the first matching record or null
        $exists = DB::table($table)->where($column, '=', $value)->first();

        if ($exists) return response()->json([ 'in_use' => true ], 200);
        return response()->json([ 'in_use' => false ], 200);
    }

    // if $column isn't in $SEARCHABLE_TABLE_COLUMNS[$table],
    // then we need to tell the user we can't proceed with their request
    return response()->json([ 'error' => 'Illegal column name: '.$column ], 400);
}

// if $table isn't a key in $SEARCHABLE_TABLE_COLUMNS,
// then we need to tell the user we can't proceed with their request
return response()->json([ 'error' => 'Illegal table name: '.$table ], 400);

I apologize for the Laravel-specific PHP code, but I will leave it because I think you can read it as pseudo-code. The important part is the two if statements that are executed synchronously.

array_key_exists() and in_array() are PHP functions.

source:

The nice thing about the algorithm that I showed above is that you can make a REST endpoint such as GET /in-use/{table}/{column}/{value} (where table, column, and value are variables).

You could have:

$SEARCHABLE_TABLE_COLUMNS = [
    'accounts' => [ 'account_name', 'phone', 'business_email' ],
    'users' => [ 'email' ],
];

and then you could make GET requests such as:

GET /in-use/accounts/account_name/Bob's Drywall (you may need to uri encode the last part, but usually not)

GET /in-use/accounts/phone/888-555-1337

GET /in-use/users/email/[email protected]

Notice also that no one can do:

GET /in-use/users/password/dogmeat1337 because password is not listed in your list of allowed columns for user.

Good luck on your journey.

1
  • 1
    I have no idea what this has to do with the question but i took a look and: i really hope you NEVER use dynamic data in $SEARCHABLE_TABLE_COLUMNS! This screams for a injection - no matter if there is a "ultra secure framework query builder" between that tries to mask and filter table and column strings! At the end table and column strings cannot be added via placeholder (prepared statements) and must be inserted directly like SELECT ... FROM {$table} WHERE {$column} = :placeholder ..... Ofc depends on adapters (mysql, mongo, ...) BUT that is no argument to be save! Pls static or no list =)
    – cottton
    Jun 18, 2019 at 11:43
-1

I've created a clean Helper Function for you to use.

if (!function_exists('array_has_one')) {

/**
 * array_has_one
 * 
 * Uses the search array to match at least one of the haystack to return TRUE
 * 
 * @param {array} $search
 * @param {array} $haystack
 * @return {boolean}
 */
function array_has_one(array $search, array $haystack){
    if(!count(array_intersect($search, $haystack)) === FALSE){
        return TRUE;
    }else{
        return FALSE;
    }

}
}

you would use this like

if(array_has_one([1,2,3,4,5], [5,6,7,8,9])){
  echo "FOUND 5";
}
1
  • I guess you realised that !count() returns a boolean, so why do you check for false instead of another simple negation? And why not just return the expression result directly?? if(somethingIsTrue)return true else false is highly redundant. In short, that code can be simplified to a one liner: return !!count(array_intersect($search, $haystack)); or even return (bool)count(array_intersect($search, $haystack));
    – Christian
    Dec 4, 2022 at 18:09

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