When I synchronize non static method and static method the behavior remains the same. Thread locks the instance for both static and non staitc methods when i put synchronized(Task.class) in both the cases

public class ThreadDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        for(int i=0;i<10;i++){
            Task task =new Task();
            new Thread(task).start();
        }
    }
}
class Task implements Runnable {

    @Override
    public void run() {
        printThreadName();

    }

    public  void printThreadName() {
        synchronized (Task.class) {


        System.out.println("Starting-->"+Thread.currentThread().getName());
        try {
            Thread.sleep(5000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println("Ending->"+Thread.currentThread().getName());
        }
    }

}

and after making the method static

public  static  void printThreadName() {
        synchronized (Task.class) {


        System.out.println("Starting-->"+Thread.currentThread().getName());
        try {
            Thread.sleep(5000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println("Ending->"+Thread.currentThread().getName());
        }
    }

Every Thread locks this class until it completes and so on. My question is why this behavior is same even for non static method in the first case.

  • 5
    If you synchronize on Task.class then you are using the same monitor (it's bacially as one instance of Class<Task>) in both cases so of course they should have the same behavior. Why would you expect otherwise? – Thomas Sep 18 at 11:31
  • To slightly expand on the answer from @Thomas, synchronised on a method just places the monitor/lock on the class anyway, which would mean if you have two synchronised methods in the same class, only one can be used at any one time. – Dave Sep 18 at 11:32
  • 1
    It would only behave different (because of different monitor) if you declare the whole method as synchronized – Michael Butscher Sep 18 at 11:33
  • 3
    @Dave not exactly, putting synchronized on a static method uses the class as the monitor while for instance methods it would be the instance itself. So completely synchronized methods could use different monitors and thus have different behavior. – Thomas Sep 18 at 11:33
  • @Dave: I was able to make out that point. My question seems to be little silly but my question was like synchronized(Anyclass.class) remains same for both static and non static right? why this behavior remains same where definition says for static method class level motioning and for non static method object level monitoring or instance level monitoring is applied. – Prasad Reddy Sep 18 at 11:38

I'll summarize the comments above:

The JLS states the following: (emphasis by me)

If the method is an instance method, it locks the monitor associated with the instance for which it was invoked (that is, the object that will be known as this during execution of the body of the method). If the method is static, it locks the monitor associated with the Class object that represents the class in which the method is defined.

So this will synchronize on the instance:

public synchronized void someMethod() { ... }

This will synchronize on the class:

public static synchronized void someMethod() { ... }

When you use a synchronized block inside a method you need to provide the monitor which can be a class (e.g. Myclass.class) or any object instance (which could be this):

synchronized(monitor) { ... }

You could use synchronized(getClass()) or synchronized(this) to get behavior very similar to method level synchronization (I'm not sure whether the getClass() variant would behave the same in all cases).

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