1

I am having a difficult time building a dictionary of parent child flags.

I have a dictionary like this:

d = {
'A': ['Blue'],
'B': ['A'],
'C': ['A'],
'D': ['C'],
}

This is my logic or thought process: If a key is 'Blue', it is the parent, and gets a flag of 0. If the value is in d.keys(), it gets a flag of 1. Where I get stuck is on the grandchildren. Here is the code I have now, and is a result of me banging my head against a figurative wall for many hours now.

level = 0
while level < 1000:
    for key, value in d.items():
        if value[0] == 'Set':
            if len(value) == 1:
                value.extend([level])
        elif len(value) >= 2:
            continue
        elif value[0] in d.keys():
            value.extend([level])
        level += 1

The result is:

A:      ['Blue', 0]
B:      ['A', 1]
C:      ['A', 2]
D:      ['D', 3]

D is a grandchild of C and should have a flag of 2, and C is a child of A and should have a value of 2, just like the other child, B.

The purpose of this is to create the correct flags no matter how many grandchildren or great-grandchildren levels there are.

The bigger picture here is to use this data to insert nested loops. I have a strange database and have to use a certain proprietary module to iterate through the lookup tables that are made available to me via class attributes. So, the code will be

while parent:
    ...block of code for parent...
    ...insert same structure here if not the parent... 
    ...statement at end of parent block...

So, a child loop may look like this:

while parent:
    ...block of code for parent...
    while child:
       ...block of code for child...
       ...variable for block insertion...
       ...statement at end of child block...
    ...statement at end of parent block...

The ...statement at end of parent/child block... is a similar to next() but using the proprietary module I need to use for this.

So, the mapper is to be used to let the program know how many nested while loops to create using this structure. I haven't gotten to inserting the nested blocks but I know it can be done. :)

I would love to learn from someone who can explain how create the mapper portion.

Thank you!

  • 1
    Why not keep all the children in the list and key being the parent id. like{'A':['B','C']} I think this will be much easier to read and calculate the total children a parent has – mad_ Sep 18 '18 at 15:30
  • It is because this dictionary is a result of some class attributes that were strings, and turned into this dictionary. And, my challenge is to turn this dictionary into some sort of referenced structure to know which is a parent, child, or grandchild (great grandchild to infinity in theory) for the next step in the process. – Debug255 Sep 18 '18 at 15:35
  • 1
    With the above-mentioned approach, you can still do all of that reporting stuff as you can iterate over to find the grandchildren and can do look up for immediate children – mad_ Sep 18 '18 at 15:36
  • If there is a way to turn this dictionary into one like yours, I'm not sure how to do it. Can you explain how? – Debug255 Sep 18 '18 at 15:36
  • what is the desirable output? – fl00r Sep 18 '18 at 15:36
1

This code modifies your existing child: parent dictionary, adding the depth flags to the end of each list. It will work correctly (both in Python 2 & Python 3) no matter what order the keys are processed in. In versions before Python 3.6, dictionaries don't necessarily preserve the insertion order of the keys, and the key order can change from one run of the program to the next. So I scrambled the entries a little to make sure that it does behave as expected.

src = {
    'D': ['C'],
    'B': ['A'],
    'A': ['Blue'],
    'C': ['A'],
}

def get_depth(d, k):
    v = d[k]
    if len(v) == 2:
        return v[1]
    else:
        parent = v[0]
        depth = 0 if parent == 'Blue' else get_depth(d, parent) + 1
        v.append(depth)
        return depth

for k in src:
    get_depth(src, k)

print(src)    

Python 3.6 output

{'D': ['C', 2], 'B': ['A', 1], 'A': ['Blue', 0], 'C': ['A', 1]}
1
d = {
  'A': ['Blue'],
  'B': ['A'],
  'C': ['A'],
  'D': ['C'],
}

output = {}
for k, v in d.items():
    output[v[0]] = output.get(v[0], [])
    output[v[0]].append(k)

output
#=> {'Blue': ['A'], 'A': ['C', 'B'], 'C': ['D']}
0

I am not sure I completely understand what the expected output should be, but this might help anyway

for key, value in d.items():
    if value[0] == 'Set':
        if len(value) == 1:
            value.extend([0])
    elif len(value) >= 2:
        continue
    elif value[0] in d.keys():
        newlevel = d[value[0]][1] + 1
        value.extend([newlevel])
  • newlevel = d[value[0]][1] + 1 gives me an IndexError. I tried using newlevel = value[1] + 1 and it results in an IndexError :) – Debug255 Sep 18 '18 at 15:47
  • 1
    I only tested you example data. – Venify Sep 18 '18 at 15:52

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