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What would be the TypeScript equivalent to this CommonJS file in ES6

const Parser = require('./src/parser');
const numerics = require('./src/numerics');

module.exports = Parser;
module.exports.numerics = numerics

I have tried doing many different ways, and this is the closest I have gotten:

import Parser = require('./src/parser');
import numerics = require('./src/numerics');

export = Parser

Now, the problem with this is, it doesn't allow me to export anything else in the TypeScript fashion.

If I add this piece of code, everything works exactly like it should and is equivalent to the original JS code.

module.exports.numerics = numerics;

  • I am using tsc. And i have seen this syntax being used elsewhere too – wolfy1339 Sep 18 '18 at 16:58
  • It's incorrect ES2015. From the TypeScript documentation, it looks like TypeScript adds it, though. – T.J. Crowder Sep 18 '18 at 17:02
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Option 1: You can combine the value meanings of the two modules this way:

import Parser = require('./src/parser');
import numerics = require('./src/numerics');

const combined = Object.assign(Parser, {numerics});
export = combined;

However, any types are lost.

Option 2: Since module.exports.numerics = numerics is actually mutating the Parser module, it would be correct to just add a declaration of numerics to that module, and then write:

import Parser = require('./src/parser');
import numerics = require('./src/numerics');

Parser.numerics = numerics;
export = Parser;

You can modify the original module declaration, or depending on how the declaration is written, you may be able to add numerics via module augmentation.

If all the code is under your control, maybe you should just assign numerics as part of the parser module rather than using either of these strange workarounds.

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