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I have a dictionary of lists of image ids that belong to a class of images such as dog and cat. Some of the images contain both dogs and cats in the image, and I want to remove those images.

Lets say I have

{'cat':[1,2,3], 'dog':[2,3,4]}

we can see that the images with id 2 and 3 have both cats and dogs. I want to exclude these images to get the following:

[[1],[4]]

I have tried this so far:

from collections import Counter
img_ids = {'cat':[1,2,3], 'dog':[2,3,4]}
flattened = [item for sublist in img_ids.values() for item in sublist]
flattened_unique = [k for k, v in dict(Counter(flattened)).items() if v < 2]
filtered_ids_dfs = []
for key, val in img_ids.items():
  filtered = [x for x in val if x in flattened_unique]
  filtered_ids_dfs.append(filtered)
print(filtered_ids_dfs)

Is there a better or more elegant solution to this? Also there may be an arbitrary number of classes, so our dictionary may have cat, dog, chicken etc.

4
  • 1
    If there were three such lists [1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 4, 5], [1, 4, 6, 7] would the desired output be [3], [5], [6, 7] (removing all items in more than one of the inputs) or [2, 3], [2, 4, 5], [4, 6, 7] (removing those items that are in all of the inputs) Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 17:46
  • python set() would be better choice and will be faster.
    – Karn Kumar
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 17:47
  • @Kevin could you provide an example with more than just 2 classes? Also it looks like the keys to your dict are irrelevant here.
    – pault
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 17:50
  • @pault The code should work if you do: {'cat':[1, 2, 3], 'dog':[2, 3, 4], 'chicken': [2, 4, 5, 6]}. it should give: [[1],[],[5,6]]
    – Kevin
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 18:50

3 Answers 3

5

Just use sets:

d = {'cat':[1,2,3], 'dog':[2,3,4]}
common = set(d['cat']) & set(d['dog'])
out = [list(set(d['cat']) - common), list(set(d['dog']) - common)]

Extending this to more than two keys:

common = set.intersection(*(set(v) for k,v in d.items()))
out = [list(set(v) - common) for k,v in d.items()]
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  • 3
    This does not appear to work. Try d = {'cat':[1, 2, 3], 'dog':[2, 3, 4], 'chicken': [2, 4, 5, 6]}
    – Alexander
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 18:24
  • Side-note: set.intersection doesn't need the arguments to be sets; any iterable works, so preconverting is pointless. And since you're not using the keys for anything, set.intersection(*(set(v) for k,v in d.items())) could simplify to the faster and simpler set.intersection(*d.values()). Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 19:50
  • @alexander it wasn't clear whether the OP wanted to only remove images that were included by every class or were merely included in more than one class. I assumed the former.
    – nimish
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 20:44
5

First, count how many objects (e.g. cat, dog) there are per image. Then find the images with only one object (unique images). Finally, use a dictionary comprehension to find images that are in the unique image list.

from collections import Counter

d = {'cat':[1,2,3], 'dog':[2,3,4], 'chicken': [2, 4, 5, 6]}

c = Counter([item for items in d.values() for item in items])
unique_images = set(k for k, count in c.iteritems() if count == 1)  # .items() in Python3

>>> {k: [item for item in items if item in unique_images] for k, items in d.iteritems()}  # .items() in Python3
{'cat': [1], 'chicken': [5, 6], 'dog': []}
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  • Alexander, great example with set() , i love using set(), set is faster.
    – Karn Kumar
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 17:49
  • 1
    [[x] for x ... doesn't strike me as correct if some of the inputs have many unique items. If the two lists were [1, 2, 3] and [4, 5, 6], I would expect the output to be [1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6] not [1], [2], [3], ... Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 17:49
  • @PatrickHaugh You are correct. I've completely changed my answer.
    – Alexander
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 19:19
  • FWIW, you can use set intersections instead of the list comp: {k: list(set(item)&unique_images) for k, items in d.iteritems()}
    – pault
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 20:19
3

You can use a list comprehension:

d = {'cat':[1,2,3], 'dog':[2,3,4]}
n = [[c for c in b if not any(c in h for j, h in d.items() if j != a)] for a, b in d.items()]

Output:

[[1], [4]]
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  • AJax1234, nice solution.
    – Karn Kumar
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 17:48
  • If we wanted the keys we would do this: n = {a:[c for c in b if not any(c in h for j, h in d.items() if j != a)] for a, b in d.items()}
    – Kevin
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 19:06
  • @Kevin - this is quadratic time, the solution by @Alexander is more efficient at O(n).
    – pault
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 20:03
  • @pault Isn't Alexander's solution O(n^2), as he iterates over the items for every key-value pair in d? ({k: [item for item in items if item in unique_images] for k, items in d.iteritems()})
    – Ajax1234
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 20:08
  • The n here refers to the iteration through d, which his solution only does once. It may be clearer if it was rewritten as {k: list(set(item)&unique_images) for k, items in d.iteritems()}. Nevertheless, the best way to measure is by timing it.
    – pault
    Commented Sep 18, 2018 at 20:13

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