32

Is it possible to include code from an external R script in an .Rmd and simultaneously run the code, display the code, and display its results in the output .HTML file? For example, if I have

x <- 1
y <- 3
z <- x + y
z

in external.R. In the output document I want to see the code above along with the result of z, i.e. 4. Essentially, I want the equivalent of what would happen if I copy/pasted what's above in an R chunk. So I want

```{r}
some.library::some.function("external.R")
```

to be the equivalent of

```{r}
x <- 1
y <- 3
z <- x + y
z
```

In the output HTML file. I've tried things like knitr::read_chunk('external.R) and source('external.R)`, but these don't display the code. Am I missing something simple?


EDIT

I found that source('external.R', echo = TRUE) will produce what I ask, but each line of the output's displayed code/results is prepended by ##. Any way to make it look like it would if the code was simply copy/pasted in a chunk in the .Rmd?

6
  • 1
    I guess my first question is: Why? What are you trying to do? Secondly, if I do source("my_script.R", echo = T) I don't see any code/results prefixed by ##. It looks exactly how it would look if I were to copy&paste code into an R terminal. Perhaps I misunderstood? – Maurits Evers Sep 19 '18 at 3:23
  • We'll, I'm not comparing the result to what it would look like in in an R terminal. I'm comparing it to how it looks in an output .HTML file. – haff Sep 19 '18 at 3:28
  • 1
    I'm giving my students an assignment where they have to complete several lengthy tasks, and for organizational purposes, I think it's easier to use external scripts rather than put everything in multiple code chunks. Also, if they execute code line-by-line in a code chunk in a .Rmd, Rstudio puts the output in a "drawer" under the chunk, which is annoying to me, as I think it makes more sense for it to appear in the console like it does in a simple .R file. – haff Sep 19 '18 at 3:33
  • 1
    I'm not quite following. You seem to be mixing up RMarkdown and straight-up R files. If you don't like the way RMarkdown renders code&text, don't use RMarkdown. But then you are saying that you are "not comparing the result to what it would look like in in an R terminal." So what are you actually trying to do and how are you executing code? In a R terminal? In RStudio? Is code in an RMarkdown file? Or in an R script. I've had my students very successfully use RMarkdown and R Notebooks. In my opinion it encourages transparent code documentation and consistent coding standards. – Maurits Evers Sep 19 '18 at 3:44
  • I love the way Rmarkdown renders code and text. What I'm saying is that if I use source('external.R', echo = T), the output HTML file has ## in front of each line. If I were to simply copy/paste the contents of my external R code into a code chunk in the .Rmd, it renders without the ##. Does that make sense? My comment about the result is the terminal was in reference to your first comment about what the result looks like in an R terminal. I don't really care about that - I only care about how it looks in the output HTML file. – haff Sep 19 '18 at 3:56
36

Although the accepted answer provides a simple and working solution, I think the most idiomatic way of doing this (without having to modify the external script at all) is to use the chunk option code to set the contents of external.R as chunk code:

```{r, code = readLines("external.R")}
```
3
  • 1
    Even better. GOSH I changed the accepted answer twice. I ought to wait a day or two before selecting one. – haff Sep 19 '18 at 13:28
  • 2
    I think this one will be the definitive answer (the rest two are also correct answers). What a coincidence -- I just wrote about the code option yesterday: yihui.name/en/2018/09/code-appendix – Yihui Xie Sep 19 '18 at 16:05
  • how do i call an external script without showing the external code? For example, setting API keys ? – FistOfFury Dec 10 '18 at 18:24
14

There is another way of doing it so it looks exactly like having the code in the markdown file.

Your external.R file:

## @knitr answer
x <- 1
y <- 3
z <- x + y
z

Your Rmarkdown file:

---
title: "Untitled"
output: html_document
---

```{r echo=FALSE}
knitr::read_chunk('external.R')
```

```{r}
<<answer>>
```

That produces: enter image description here

3
  • Yep. Good call. This isn't exactly what I requested in my question, but as it turns out, this it is what I was looking for. – haff Sep 19 '18 at 4:28
  • This works for me but in RStudio, the editor indicates the line with <<answer>> is an unexpected token '<' error. I didn't know you could use info like @knitr. – steveb Sep 19 '18 at 4:47
  • FYI, the error RStudio was giving me appears to have gone away. – steveb Sep 19 '18 at 5:01
10

You could set comment = NA in your code chunk options.

Example:

---
title: "Untitled"
output: html_document
---

```{r setup, include=FALSE}
knitr::opts_chunk$set(
    echo = TRUE,
    comment=NA)
```

## Example

```{r}
source("example.R", echo = T, prompt.echo = "", spaced = F)
```

This produces

enter image description here

6
  • 1
    I think at last, Mr. Baggins, you and I understand one another. That does the trick. Thanks Maurits. – haff Sep 19 '18 at 4:07
  • 1
    No worries @haff;-) Glad it was helpful. – Maurits Evers Sep 19 '18 at 4:08
  • Ok, I hate to go back on what I said, but this doesn't exactly produce what I want. It's almost there, but maybe source isn't the right function. In the example you have above, the lines x <- 3 and y <- 4 don't have syntax highlighting. These lines are prepended with a > (like they were run in the R shell), which I think this is probably an artifact of how the source function works? – haff Sep 19 '18 at 4:27
  • 1
    @haff No problem at all. Everything makes a lot more sense now that I understand what you are trying to do. You can change the prompt character with prompt.echo within source. So for example, source("example.R", echo = T, prompt.echo = "") would remove the >. You can also remove the additional extra linebreak with source("example.R", echo = T, prompt.echo = "", spaced = F). Does that help? – Maurits Evers Sep 19 '18 at 4:37
  • Yes - that's good to know. I think spadarian's answer captures what I wanted to do a bit better, but I can foresee of other cases in which the source options you listed will be helpful to me. Thanks. – haff Sep 19 '18 at 4:55

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