17

I would like to send email through a proxy.

My current implementation is as follows:

I connect to the smtp server with authentication. After I've successfully logged in, I send an email. It works fine but when I look at the email header I can see my host name. I would like to tunnel it through a proxy instead.

Any help will be highly appreciated.

9 Answers 9

15

Use SocksiPy:

import smtplib
import socks

#'proxy_port' should be an integer
#'PROXY_TYPE_SOCKS4' can be replaced to HTTP or PROXY_TYPE_SOCKS5
socks.setdefaultproxy(socks.PROXY_TYPE_SOCKS4, proxy_host, proxy_port)
socks.wrapmodule(smtplib)

smtp = smtplib.SMTP()
...
5
  • 3
    Official version doesn't work with this. Use this instead. Same thing, just a fork Commented Jan 26, 2015 at 20:19
  • 2
    2019 update: SocksPy is a bit outdated, use PySocks instead. pip install pysocks Also note that trying to use SMTP over an HTTP proxy isn't usually possible, one must get a SOCKS proxy. I personally use Tor, you can read up on how to setup Tor socks proxy here. PySocks has a really useful function called create_connection that makes patching smtplib to work with a proxy really easy. Just look at _get_socket in smtplib.
    – mkerrig
    Commented Nov 14, 2019 at 21:59
  • 2
    Since I ran into it and didn't see it here: socks.warpmodule(smtplib) has the side-effect that other libraries are also patched (requests for example). The better way is going without monkeypatching, and like @mkerrig said, look at SMTP._get_socket and use socks.create_connection. Commented Feb 3, 2020 at 15:22
  • Hi @mkerrig, I have a question, how do you know that it is not possible to SMTP over HTTP proxies? Thank you! Commented Jan 23, 2022 at 21:42
  • 1
    @DANIELROSASPEREZ HTTP proxies will only forward HTTP requests, so traffic is limited to the HTTP protocol & associated ports. I said it "usually" isn't possible to do SMTP & other traffic because many proxy servers will do both HTTP & SOCKS, but generally when purchasing them or using public proxies, they list what kind of protocols the server supports. If you're unfamiliar with HTTP/SOCKS protocols and what I'm talking about there, you can read more about all that here
    – mkerrig
    Commented Feb 14, 2022 at 23:26
5

I had a similar problem yesterday, this is the code I wrote to solve the problem. It invisibly allows you to use all of the smtp methods via proxy.

#!/usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
#
#       smtprox.py
#       Shouts to suidrewt
#
# ############################################# #
# This module allows Proxy support in MailFux.  #
# Shouts to Betrayed for telling me about       #
# http CONNECT                                  #
# ############################################# #

import smtplib
import socket

def recvline(sock):
    stop = 0
    line = ''
    while True:
        i = sock.recv(1)
        if i == '\n': stop = 1
        line += i
        if stop == 1:
            break
    return line

class ProxSMTP( smtplib.SMTP ):

    def __init__(self, host='', port=0, p_address='',p_port=0, local_hostname=None,
             timeout=socket._GLOBAL_DEFAULT_TIMEOUT):
        """Initialize a new instance.

        If specified, `host' is the name of the remote host to which to
        connect.  If specified, `port' specifies the port to which to connect.
        By default, smtplib.SMTP_PORT is used.  An SMTPConnectError is raised
        if the specified `host' doesn't respond correctly.  If specified,
        `local_hostname` is used as the FQDN of the local host.  By default,
        the local hostname is found using socket.getfqdn().

        """
        self.p_address = p_address
        self.p_port = p_port

        self.timeout = timeout
        self.esmtp_features = {}
        self.default_port = smtplib.SMTP_PORT
        if host:
            (code, msg) = self.connect(host, port)
            if code != 220:
                raise SMTPConnectError(code, msg)
        if local_hostname is not None:
            self.local_hostname = local_hostname
        else:
            # RFC 2821 says we should use the fqdn in the EHLO/HELO verb, and
            # if that can't be calculated, that we should use a domain literal
            # instead (essentially an encoded IP address like [A.B.C.D]).
            fqdn = socket.getfqdn()
            if '.' in fqdn:
                self.local_hostname = fqdn
            else:
                # We can't find an fqdn hostname, so use a domain literal
                addr = '127.0.0.1'
                try:
                    addr = socket.gethostbyname(socket.gethostname())
                except socket.gaierror:
                    pass
                self.local_hostname = '[%s]' % addr
        smtplib.SMTP.__init__(self)

    def _get_socket(self, port, host, timeout):
        # This makes it simpler for SMTP_SSL to use the SMTP connect code
        # and just alter the socket connection bit.
        if self.debuglevel > 0: print>>stderr, 'connect:', (host, port)
        new_socket = socket.create_connection((self.p_address,self.p_port), timeout)
        new_socket.sendall("CONNECT {0}:{1} HTTP/1.1\r\n\r\n".format(port,host))
        for x in xrange(2): recvline(new_socket)
        return new_socket
2
  • 1
    Doesn't seem to be sending the email, it just sits there and hang. Tried with a couple different proxies too.
    – Sinista
    Commented Jan 11, 2012 at 16:39
  • 2
    As @Sinista says, your code doesn't work, instead it just sits there and hangs. I've taken the liberty of fixing it so now it's working fine for me. See my answer.
    – Zenadix
    Commented Jul 10, 2015 at 19:05
2

As mkerrig and Denis Cornehl noted in a comment on another answer PySocks create_connection with a modified SMTP class from smtplib works without having to monkeypatch sockets for everything.

I still hate this implementation (who know what will break with other version of python or smtplib), but this works for now (3.8.1). Since I was unable to find any other solutions elsewhere on the internet that worked, here is my attempt:

  1. Copy the init and _get_socket functions from the smtplib.SMTP class
  2. Modify init to add proxy_addr, and proxy_port
  3. Modify _get_socket so that it returns a socks.create_connection() (vs socket)
  4. Change SMTPConnectError to smtplib.SMTPConnectError so it works

my_proxy_smtplib.py:

import socket
import smtplib

import socks


class ProxySMTP(smtplib.SMTP):
    def __init__(self, host='', port=0, local_hostname=None,
                 timeout=socket._GLOBAL_DEFAULT_TIMEOUT,
                 source_address=None, proxy_addr=None, proxy_port=None):
        """Initialize a new instance.

        If specified, `host' is the name of the remote host to which to
        connect.  If specified, `port' specifies the port to which to connect.
        By default, smtplib.SMTP_PORT is used.  If a host is specified the
        connect method is called, and if it returns anything other than a
        success code an SMTPConnectError is raised.  If specified,
        `local_hostname` is used as the FQDN of the local host in the HELO/EHLO
        command.  Otherwise, the local hostname is found using
        socket.getfqdn(). The `source_address` parameter takes a 2-tuple (host,
        port) for the socket to bind to as its source address before
        connecting. If the host is '' and port is 0, the OS default behavior
        will be used.

        """
        self._host = host
        self.timeout = timeout
        self.esmtp_features = {}
        self.command_encoding = 'ascii'
        self.source_address = source_address
        self.proxy_addr = proxy_addr
        self.proxy_port = proxy_port

        if host:
            (code, msg) = self.connect(host, port)
            if code != 220:
                self.close()
                raise smtplib.SMTPConnectError(code, msg)
        if local_hostname is not None:
            self.local_hostname = local_hostname
        else:
            # RFC 2821 says we should use the fqdn in the EHLO/HELO verb, and
            # if that can't be calculated, that we should use a domain literal
            # instead (essentially an encoded IP address like [A.B.C.D]).
            fqdn = socket.getfqdn()
            if '.' in fqdn:
                self.local_hostname = fqdn
            else:
                # We can't find an fqdn hostname, so use a domain literal
                addr = '127.0.0.1'
                try:
                    addr = socket.gethostbyname(socket.gethostname())
                except socket.gaierror:
                    pass
                self.local_hostname = '[%s]' % addr

    def _get_socket(self, host, port, timeout):
        # This makes it simpler for SMTP_SSL to use the SMTP connect code
        # and just alter the socket connection bit.
        if self.debuglevel > 0:
            self._print_debug('connect: to', (host, port), self.source_address)
        return socks.create_connection((host, port),
                                       proxy_type=socks.PROXY_TYPE_SOCKS5,
                                       timeout=timeout,
                                       proxy_addr=self.proxy_addr,
                                       proxy_port=self.proxy_port)

And to use:

from my_proxy_smtplib import ProxySMTP

email_server = ProxySMTP('smtp.gmail.com', 587,
                         proxy_addr='192.168.0.1',
                         proxy_port=3487)
email_server.starttls()
email_server.login(user_email, user_pass)
email_server.sendmail(user_email, recipient_list, msg.as_string())
email_server.quit()
2

A much simpler approach which patches smtplib only:

proxy_url = urlparse('http://user:[email protected]:8080')

def _smtplib_get_socket(self, host, port, timeout):
    # Patched SMTP._get_socket
    return socks.create_connection(
        (host, port),
        timeout,
        self.source_address,
        proxy_type=socks.HTTP,
        proxy_addr=proxy_url.hostname,
        proxy_port=int(proxy_url.port),
        proxy_username=proxy_url.username,
        proxy_password=proxy_url.password,
    )

# We do this instead of wrapmodule due to
# https://github.com/Anorov/PySocks/issues/158
smtplib.SMTP._get_socket = _smtplib_get_socket
0
0

This code has earned from me. 1. The file name must not be email.py Rename file name for example emailSend.py 2. It is necessary to allow Google to send messages from unreliable sources.

0

For those who still need it :) I've made a working solution with Python3 and PySocks:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import smtplib, socks, re, os, logging
from urllib.request import getproxies
from email.mime.multipart import MIMEMultipart
from email.mime.text import MIMEText
from email.mime.application import MIMEApplication

# ============================================================= #

# global proxy config dictionary
PROXY = {"useproxy": True, "server": None, "port": None, "type": "HTTP", "username": None, "password": None}
# ============================================================= #

class Proxifier:
    """
    Helper class to configure proxy settings. Exposes the `get_socket()` method that returns 
    a proxified connection (socket).
    """

    def __init__(self, proxy_server=None, proxy_port=None, proxy_type='HTTP', proxy_username=None, proxy_password=None):
        # proxy type: HTTP, SOCKS4 or SOCKS5 (default = HTTP)
        self.proxy_type = {'HTTP': socks.HTTP, 'SOCKS4': socks.SOCKS4, 'SOCKS5': socks.SOCKS5}.get(proxy_type, socks.HTTP)
        # proxy auth if required
        self.proxy_username = proxy_username
        self.proxy_password = proxy_password
        # if host or port not set, attempt to retrieve from system
        if not proxy_server or not proxy_port:
            self._get_sysproxy()
        else:
            self.proxy_server = proxy_server
            self.proxy_port = proxy_port        

    def _get_sysproxy(self, setvars=True):
        """
        Retrieves system proxy settings from OS environment variables (HTTP_PROXY, HTTPS_PROXY etc.)
        If `setvars` == `True`, sets the member variables as well.
        """
        proxy_server, proxy_port, proxy_username, proxy_password = (None, None, None, None)
        template = re.compile(r'^(((?P<user>[^:]+)(:(?P<pass>[^@]*)?))@)?(?P<host>[^:]+?)(:(?P<port>\d{1,5})?)$', re.I)
        try:
            sys_proxy = getproxies()
            for p in sys_proxy:
                if p.lower().startswith('http') or p.lower().startswith('socks'):
                    sp = sys_proxy[p].split('//')
                    sp = sp[1] if len(sp) > 1 else sp[0]
                    m = template.fullmatch(sp)
                    proxy_server = m.group('host') or None
                    try:
                        proxy_port = int(m.group('port')) or None
                    except:
                        pass
                    proxy_username = m.group('user') or None
                    proxy_password = m.group('pass') or None
                    break
        except Exception as err:
            logging.exception(err)

        if setvars:
            self.proxy_server = proxy_server or self.proxy_server
            self.proxy_port = proxy_port or self.proxy_port
            self.proxy_username = proxy_username or self.proxy_username
            self.proxy_password = proxy_password or self.proxy_password
        return (proxy_server, proxy_port)

    def get_socket(self, source_address, host, port, timeout=None):
        """
        Applies proxy settings to PySocks `create_connection()` method to
        created a proxified connection (socket) which can be used by other
        interfaces to establish connection.
        """
        return socks.create_connection((host, port), timeout, source_address, 
                                       proxy_type=self.proxy_type, proxy_addr=self.proxy_server, proxy_port=self.proxy_port, 
                                       proxy_username=self.proxy_username, proxy_password=self.proxy_password)

    @staticmethod
    def get_proxifier(proxy=PROXY):
        """
        Factory returns a `Proxifier` object given proxy settings in a dictionary.
        """
        if not proxy or not proxy.get('useproxy', False):
            return None
        return Proxifier(proxy.get('server', None), proxy.get('port', None), proxy.get('type', None), 
                        proxy.get('username', None), proxy.get('password', None))

# ============================================================= #                                       

class SMTP_Proxy(smtplib.SMTP):
    """
    Descendant of SMTP with optional proxy wrapping.
    """

    def __init__(self, host='', port=0, local_hostname=None, timeout=object(), source_address=None, 
                 proxifier: Proxifier=None):
        # `Proxifier` object if proxy is required
        self._proxifier = proxifier
        super().__init__(host, port, local_hostname, timeout, source_address)        

    def _get_socket(self, host, port, timeout):
        """
        Overridden method of base class to allow for proxified connection.
        """
        if not self._proxifier:
            # no proxy: use base class implementation
            return super()._get_socket(host, port, timeout)
        if timeout is not None and not timeout:
            raise ValueError('Non-blocking socket (timeout=0) is not supported')
        if self.debuglevel > 0:
            self._print_debug('connect: to', (host, port), self.source_address)   
        # proxy: use proxifier connection     
        return self._proxifier.get_socket(self.source_address, host, port, timeout)

# ============================================================= #

class SMTP_SSL_Proxy(smtplib.SMTP_SSL):
    """
    Descendant of SMTP_SSL with optional proxy wrapping.
    """

    def __init__(self, host='', port=0, local_hostname=None, keyfile=None, certfile=None, timeout=object(), source_address=None, context=None, 
                 proxifier: Proxifier=None):     
        # `Proxifier` object if proxy is required   
        self._proxifier = proxifier
        super().__init__(host, port, local_hostname, keyfile, certfile, timeout, source_address, context)

    def _get_socket(self, host, port, timeout):
        """
        Overridden method of base class to allow for proxified connection.
        """
        if not self._proxifier:
            # no proxy: use base class implementation
            return super()._get_socket(host, port, timeout)
        if timeout is not None and not timeout:
            raise ValueError('Non-blocking socket (timeout=0) is not supported')
        if self.debuglevel > 0:
            self._print_debug('connect: to', (host, port), self.source_address)
        # proxy: use proxifier connection
        newsocket = self._proxifier.get_socket(self.source_address, host, port, timeout)
        return self.context.wrap_socket(newsocket, server_hostname=self._host)

# ============================================================= #

def send_email(body, subject, sender, receivers, smtp, proxy=PROXY, sender_name='Appname', attachments=None):
    """
    Sends email with optional attachments and proxy settings.
    """
    is_ssl = smtp['protocol'].upper() == 'SSL'
    smtp_class = SMTP_SSL_Proxy if is_ssl else SMTP_Proxy
    try:
        msg = MIMEMultipart()
        msg['Subject'] = subject
        msg['To'] = ', '.join(receivers)
        # msg['Bcc'] = ', '.join(receivers)
        msg['From'] = f'{sender_name} <{sender}>' if sender_name else sender
        msg.attach(MIMEText(body))

        if attachments:
            for filepath in attachments:
                bname = os.path.basename(filepath)
                try:
                    with open(filepath, 'rb') as file_:
                        part = MIMEApplication(file_.read(), Name=bname)
                    part['Content-Disposition'] = f'attachment; filename="{bname}"'
                    msg.attach(part)
                except:
                    continue

        with smtp_class(smtp['server'], smtp['port'], proxifier=Proxifier.get_proxifier(proxy)) as emailer:
            emailer.login(smtp['login'], smtp['password'])
            if not is_ssl: 
                emailer.starttls()
            emailer.sendmail(sender, receivers, msg.as_string())

        logging.debug(f"--- Email sent to: {receivers}")

    except smtplib.SMTPException as smtp_err:
        logging.exception(smtp_err)

    except Exception as err:
        logging.exception(err)
0

I had this issue a while ago, here is how I solved it. This example uses Tor as socks5 proxy.

import socks
import socket
from ssl import create_default_context
from smtplib import SMTP_SSL

socks.setdefaultproxy(socks.PROXY_TYPE_SOCKS5, '127.0.0.1', 9050)
socket.socket = socks.socksocket

context = create_default_context()
ssl_socket = context.wrap_socket(socket.socket(), server_hostname=<your_smtp_server>)

smtp_server = SMTP_SSL(<your_smtp_server>, 465)
smtp_server.login(<your_smtp_user>, <your_smtp_password>)
  • socks.setdefaultproxy() is used to set the default proxy type to SOCKS5 with the ip and port of your socks5 proxy
  • socket.socket = socks.socksocket assigns the socks.socksocket class to the socket.socket attribute. This effectively replaces the standard socket class with the socks.socksocket class, allowing all subsequent socket operations to be routed through the socks proxy.
  • context.wrap_socket(socket.socket(), server_hostname=<your_smtp_server>) wraps the socket in an SSL/TLS layer using the provided SSL context. This creates an SSL/TLS connection to the specified SMTP server.
-1

The smtplib module doesn't include the functionality to connect to a SMTP server through a HTTP proxy. The custom class posted by ryoh didn't work for me, apparently because my HTTP proxy receives encoded messages only. I wrote the following custom class based on ryos's code, and it worked fine. (Your mileage, however, may vary.)

import smtplib
import socket

def recvline(sock):
    """Receives a line."""
    stop = 0
    line = ''
    while True:
        i = sock.recv(1)
        if i.decode('UTF-8') == '\n': stop = 1
        line += i.decode('UTF-8')
        if stop == 1:
            print('Stop reached.')
            break
    print('Received line: %s' % line)
    return line

class ProxySMTP(smtplib.SMTP):
    """Connects to a SMTP server through a HTTP proxy."""

    def __init__(self, host='', port=0, p_address='',p_port=0, local_hostname=None,
             timeout=socket._GLOBAL_DEFAULT_TIMEOUT):
        """Initialize a new instance.

        If specified, `host' is the name of the remote host to which to
        connect.  If specified, `port' specifies the port to which to connect.
        By default, smtplib.SMTP_PORT is used.  An SMTPConnectError is raised
        if the specified `host' doesn't respond correctly.  If specified,
        `local_hostname` is used as the FQDN of the local host.  By default,
        the local hostname is found using socket.getfqdn().

        """
        self.p_address = p_address
        self.p_port = p_port

        self.timeout = timeout
        self.esmtp_features = {}
        self.default_port = smtplib.SMTP_PORT

        if host:
            (code, msg) = self.connect(host, port)
            if code != 220:
                raise IOError(code, msg)

        if local_hostname is not None:
            self.local_hostname = local_hostname
        else:
            # RFC 2821 says we should use the fqdn in the EHLO/HELO verb, and
            # if that can't be calculated, that we should use a domain literal
            # instead (essentially an encoded IP address like [A.B.C.D]).
            fqdn = socket.getfqdn()

            if '.' in fqdn:
                self.local_hostname = fqdn
            else:
                # We can't find an fqdn hostname, so use a domain literal
                addr = '127.0.0.1'

                try:
                    addr = socket.gethostbyname(socket.gethostname())
                except socket.gaierror:
                    pass
                self.local_hostname = '[%s]' % addr

        smtplib.SMTP.__init__(self)

    def _get_socket(self, port, host, timeout):
        # This makes it simpler for SMTP to use the SMTP connect code
        # and just alter the socket connection bit.
        print('Will connect to:', (host, port))
        print('Connect to proxy.')
        new_socket = socket.create_connection((self.p_address,self.p_port), timeout)

        s = "CONNECT %s:%s HTTP/1.1\r\n\r\n" % (port,host)
        s = s.encode('UTF-8')
        new_socket.sendall(s)

        print('Sent CONNECT. Receiving lines.')
        for x in range(2): recvline(new_socket)

        print('Connected.')
        return new_socket

To connect to the SMTP server, just use the class ProxySMTP instead of smtplib.SMTP.

proxy_host = YOUR_PROXY_HOST
proxy_port = YOUR_PROXY_PORT

# Both port 25 and 587 work for SMTP
conn = ProxySMTP(host='smtp.gmail.com', port=587,
                 p_address=proxy_host, p_port=proxy_port)

conn.ehlo()
conn.starttls()
conn.ehlo()

r, d = conn.login(YOUR_EMAIL_ADDRESS, YOUR_PASSWORD)

print('Login reply: %s' % r)

sender = '[email protected]'
receivers = ['[email protected]']

message = """From: From Person <[email protected]>
To: To Person <[email protected]>
Subject: SMTP e-mail test

This is a test e-mail message.
"""

print('Send email.')
conn.sendmail(sender, receivers, message)

print('Success.')
conn.close()
3
  • what is the error 220? The code is raising the IOError, Received line: HTTP/1.1 412 Precondition Failed, Received line: Cache-Control: no-cache, IOError: [Errno -1] ma: no-cache Commented Sep 11, 2015 at 15:28
  • Your code is not working. GIving error - AttributeError: ProxySMTP instance has no attribute 'local_hostname' Commented Apr 8, 2016 at 9:10
  • Get's stuck at Connect to proxy. Sent CONNECT. Receiving lines. :( Any ideas how to fix that?
    – rflume
    Commented Jun 26, 2019 at 0:32
-1

I have tried many methods, but I found Nginx SMTP proxy is a better one, it is not necessary do the monkey patch, you just need to install Nginx on an internet machine connect with your private network, the Nginx Configuration is just like this.

stream {
   server {
      listen 25;
      proxy_pass some_specified_smtpserver:25;
   }
}

ref: https://docs.nginx.com/nginx/admin-guide/mail-proxy/mail-proxy/

1
  • This doesn't solve the problem that's asked.
    – yabhishek
    Commented Jun 29, 2022 at 6:29

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