4

I'm a beginner in programming and I often see many programs using the prefix std if they are using any std functions like std::cout, std::cin, etc. I was wondering what is it's purpose ? Is it just a way of good programming or is there more to it ? Does it make any difference for the compiler or is it readability or what ? Thanks.

11

The STL types and functions are defined in the namespace named std. The std:: prefix is used to use the types without fully including the std namespace.

Option 1 (use the prefix)

#include <iostream>

void Example() {
  std::cout << "Hello World" << std::endl;
}

Option #2 (use the namespace)

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void Example() {
  cout << "Hello World" << endl;
}

Option #3 (use types individually)

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

void Example() {
    cout << "Hello World" << endl;
}

Note: There are other implications to including an entire C++ namespace (option #2) other than not having to prefix every type / method with std:: (especially if done within a header) file. Many C++ programmers avoid this practice and prefer #1 or #3.

  • 1
    @Erik that was the other option i elluded to. I 'll make it explicit – JaredPar Mar 9 '11 at 0:08
  • I would point out that you should never include the whole namespace in your header file. It would be also included in the user's source (which includes your header), which is not what you want. – Adam Trhon Mar 9 '11 at 0:21
  • @Dadam, the last paragraph of my answer states it's #2 shouldn't be done in the header – JaredPar Mar 9 '11 at 0:36
  • Note that #3 is especially preferred for the function (template) std::swap, because using std::swap; swap(a,b); is the way to ensure that you get ADL-overloaded swap if it exists, and boring old std::swap if it doesn't. std::swap can be specialized for user-defined classes one at a time, but for user-defined class templates ADL is the only legal way to provide a custom swap. Move semantics sort of make that problem go away, though, maybe this style of using std::swap can change in C++0x. – Steve Jessop Mar 9 '11 at 0:49
  • Rather than calling it "STL", the correct term is "C++ Standard Library". (The actual STL is old, obsolete, and not compatible with the standard, and there are things in the std namespace that were not in the STL.) – Kristopher Johnson Mar 9 '11 at 1:36
12

C++ has a concept of namespaces.

namespace foo {
  int bar();
}

namespace baz {
  int bar();
}

These two functions can coexist without conflict, since they're in different namespaces.

Most of the standard library functions and classes live in the "std" namespace. To access e.g. cout, you need to do one of the following, in order of preference:

  • std::cout << 1;
  • using std::cout; cout << 1;
  • using namespace std; cout << 1;

The reason you should avoid using is demonstrated with the above foo and baz namespaces. If you had using namespace foo; using namespace baz; any attempt to call bar() would be ambiguous. Using the namespace prefix is explicit and exact, and a good habit.

2

Nobody mentioned in their answer that a using namespace foo statement can be put inside a function body, thereby reducing namespace contamination in other scopes.

For example:

// This scope not affected by using namespace statement below.

void printRecord(...)
{
    using namespace std;
    // Frequent use of std::cout, io manipulators, etc...
    // Constantly prefixing with std:: would be tedious here.
}

class Foo
{
   // This scope not affected by using namespace statement above.
};

int main()
{
   // This scope not affected either.
}

You can even put a using namespace foo statement inside a local scope (pair of curly braces).

1

It's a C++ feature called namespaces:

namespace foo {
   void a();
}


// ...

foo::a();

// or:

using namespace foo;
a(); // only works if there is only one definition of `a` in both `foo` and global scope!

The advantage is, that there may be multiple functions named a - as long as they are within different namespaces, they can be used unambiguously (i.e. foo::a(), another_namespace::a()). The whole C++ standard library resides in std for this purpose.

Use using namespace std; to avoid the prefix if you can stand the disadvantages (name clashes, less clear where a function belongs to, ...).

1

It's short for the standard namespace.

You could use:

using namespace std

if you don't want to keep using std::cout and just use cout

  • 1
    I'll disagree here. std:: is preferred over using namespace std – Tim Mar 9 '11 at 0:09
  • If you "usually" use this, stop. See @Erik's answer. – Chinmay Kanchi Mar 9 '11 at 0:11
  • Okay, "usually" wasn't the right word to use. Changed it to mean what I meant. – Steve Mar 9 '11 at 0:12

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