Here are two functions (class methods):

private static Vector2[] ConvertVector2(Vector2[] values)
{
    var maxX = float.MinValue;
    var maxY = float.MinValue;
    var minX = float.MaxValue;
    var minY = float.MaxValue;

    foreach (var point in values)
    {
        maxX = Mathf.Max(point.x, maxX);
        minX = Mathf.Min(point.x, minX);
        maxY = Mathf.Max(point.y, maxY);
        minY = Mathf.Min(point.y, minY);
    }

    var result = new Vector2 [4]
    {
        new Vector2(minX, minY),
        new Vector2(maxX, maxY),
        new Vector2(maxX, minY),
        new Vector2(minX, maxY),
    };

    return result;
}


private static Vector3[] ConvertVector3(Vector3[] values)
{
    var zValue = values[0].z;
    var maxX = float.MinValue;
    var maxY = float.MinValue;
    var minX = float.MaxValue;
    var minY = float.MaxValue;

    foreach (var point in values)
    {
        maxX = Mathf.Max(point.x, maxX);
        minX = Mathf.Min(point.x, minX);
        maxY = Mathf.Max(point.y, maxY);
        minY = Mathf.Min(point.y, minY);
    }

    var result = new Vector3 [4]
    {
        new Vector3(minX, minY, zValue),
        new Vector3(maxX, maxY, zValue),
        new Vector3(maxX, minY, zValue),
        new Vector3(minX, maxY, zValue),
    };

    return result;
}

where Vector2 and Vector3 are structs defined in Unity game engine. I am new to C# and I am trying to figure out if I can use generic functions to not duplicate tons of code in these 2 functions.

  • 1
    If you used the built-in Vector2, Vector2.Max is already available – Panagiotis Kanavos Sep 19 at 11:11
  • LINQ's Min and Max probably does what you want already. You just need to specify the selector function. If you want to calculate both min and max in a single iteration you can use Aggregate – Panagiotis Kanavos Sep 19 at 11:13
  • 1
    I guess, NO, you shouldn't. It does not matter whether you can or cannot. Because they are different, one has 3 arguments, other 2 arguments. It does not make sense to make this function Generic. – Access Denied Sep 19 at 11:15

Short version

You can reduce the functions to :

private static Vector2[] ConvertVector2(Vector2[] values)
{
    var initial = new Stats2(float.MinValue, float.MaxValue, float.MinValue, float.MaxValue);

    return values.Aggregate(initial,Stats2.Apply,
        acc => new [] {
            new Vector2(acc.MinX, acc.MinY),
            new Vector2(acc.MaxX, acc.MaxY),
            new Vector2(acc.MaxX, acc.MinY),
            new Vector2(acc.MinX, acc.MaxY),
        });
}

by treating the comparison and result generation code as functions and passing them as parameters to a folding function. This common pattern is implemented by LINQ through the Enumarable.Aggregate method

Long version

You can use LINQ's Enumerable.Aggregate to calculate custom aggregations on top of any IEnumerable sequence. Aggregate applies a function to every element in a sequence whose arguments are the current element and the result of the previous operation. Another way to view it is performing an operation inside a loop between the current element and a stored result. That's what your current code does already.

Min and Max are specializations whose aggregation function is Min and Max respectively.

The following snippet uses the Aggregate overload that accepts an aggregation function and a final result selector to produce the result array.

Due to laziness I used the built-in Vector2 class but added a Stats2 class to make the selector cleaner.

struct Stats2
{
    public readonly float MaxX;
    public readonly float MinX;
    public readonly float MaxY;
    public readonly float MinY;

    public Stats2(float maxX, float minX, float maxY, float minY)
        => (MaxX, MinX, MaxY, MinY) = (maxX, minX, maxY, minY);
}

var values = new [] 
{
    new Vector2(1,1),
    new Vector2(2,2),
    new Vector2(3,3),
    new Vector2(4,1),
};

ConnvertVector2 can be written like this :

private static Vector2[] ConvertVector2(Vector2[] values)
{
    var initial = new Stats2(float.MinValue, float.MaxValue, float.MinValue, float.MaxValue);

    return values.Aggregate(initial,
        (acc, point) => new Stats2(
                Math.Max(point.X, acc.MaxX),
                Math.Min(point.X, acc.MinX),
                Math.Max(point.Y, acc.MaxY),
                Math.Min(point.Y, acc.MinY)),
        acc => new [] {
                new Vector2(acc.MinX, acc.MinY),
                new Vector2(acc.MaxX, acc.MaxY),
                new Vector2(acc.MaxX, acc.MinY),
               new Vector2(acc.MinX, acc.MaxY),
        });
}

ConvertVector3 performs the same calculation with a small difference in the result selector, which uses the Z value of the first element:

    private static Vector3[] ConvertVector3(Vector3[] values)
    {
        var zValue = values[0].Z;
        var initial = new Stats2(float.MinValue, float.MaxValue, float.MinValue, float.MaxValue);
        return values.Aggregate(initial,
            (acc, point) => new Stats2(
                    Math.Max(point.X, acc.MaxX),
                    Math.Min(point.X, acc.MinX),
                    Math.Max(point.Y, acc.MaxY),
                    Math.Min(point.Y, acc.MinY)),
            acc => new [] {
                  new Vector3(acc.MinX, acc.MinY,zValue),
                  new Vector3(acc.MaxX, acc.MaxY,zValue),
                  new Vector3(acc.MaxX, acc.MinY,zValue),
                  new Vector3(acc.MinX, acc.MaxY,zValue),
            });
    }

One improvement could be to move the aggregate functions to Stats2 itself :

struct Stats2
{
    public readonly float MaxX;
    public readonly float MinX;
    public readonly float MaxY;
    public readonly float MinY;

    public Stats2(float maxX, float minX, float maxY, float minY)
        => (MaxX, MinX, MaxY, MinY) = (maxX, minX, maxY, minY);

    public static Stats2 Apply(Stats2 acc,Vector2 point) =>
        new Stats2(  Math.Max(point.X, acc.MaxX),
                     Math.Min(point.X, acc.MinX),
                     Math.Max(point.Y, acc.MaxY),
                     Math.Min(point.Y, acc.MinY));

    public static Stats2 Apply(Stats2 acc,Vector3 point) =>
        new Stats2(  Math.Max(point.X, acc.MaxX),
                     Math.Min(point.X, acc.MinX),
                     Math.Max(point.Y, acc.MaxY),
                     Math.Min(point.Y, acc.MinY));
}

ConvertVector2 can be reduced to:

private static Vector2[] ConvertVector2(Vector2[] values)
{
    var initial = new Stats2(float.MinValue, float.MaxValue, float.MinValue, float.MaxValue);

    return values.Aggregate(initial,Stats2.Apply,
        acc => new [] {
            new Vector2(acc.MinX, acc.MinY),
            new Vector2(acc.MaxX, acc.MaxY),
            new Vector2(acc.MaxX, acc.MinY),
            new Vector2(acc.MinX, acc.MaxY),
        });
}
  • That looks magical.. too bad that trying to remove a few lines of code you introduced a whole lot of complexity and a bunch of extra code. Try and unit test that.. such fun – ppumkin Sep 19 at 13:54
  • @ppumkin On the contrary, no magic and no added complexity. That's LINQ. That's how aggregate functions in LINQ work. As for unit testing, it's trivial. Just pass an input array and compare it with an ouput array. In fact, by extracting parts of the problem as separate methods it's now easier to unit test individual parts – Panagiotis Kanavos Sep 19 at 14:04
  • @ppumkin in fact, that's a very common pattern called folding. You'll see it referd by that name in functional languages like F#, in libraries like MoreLINQ. Instead of looping and modifying state to get a result, apply a function to each element and accumulate the results. The functions themselves become parameters to fold or Aggregate – Panagiotis Kanavos Sep 19 at 14:05
  • Thank you for explaining. I would still have a hard time trying to explain that to a junior developer. To be honest I know a few senior developers that would struggle to understand that. If you understand it that is great.. but how many "hallway devs" people will understand that. Its just an enterprise limitation. +1 – ppumkin Sep 19 at 14:13
  • @ppumkin those developers would have a hard time understanding even LINQ then, or the changes introduced since C# 5. Unless they use some memorized structures without understanding what they do. This has nothing to do with working in an enterprise environment either. Javascript works that way too. The extension methods you used in your answer were introduced to support those functional idioms. – Panagiotis Kanavos Sep 19 at 14:18

I don't think it makes sense to use generics since there is no useful common base class or interface implemented by both Vector2 and Vector3.

Given that the only difference between both functions is that the 3D version sets a fixed Z value for all the result vectors I'd simply keep the logic in the 2D function and then re-use it from the 3D one setting the Z value, for instance:

private static Vector2[] ConvertVector2(Vector2[] values)
{
    var maxX = float.MinValue;
    var maxY = float.MinValue;
    var minX = float.MaxValue;
    var minY = float.MaxValue;

    foreach (var point in values)
    {
        maxX = Mathf.Max(point.x, maxX);
        minX = Mathf.Min(point.x, minX);
        maxY = Mathf.Max(point.y, maxY);
        minY = Mathf.Min(point.y, minY);
    }

    var result = new Vector2 [4]
    {
        new Vector2(minX, minY),
        new Vector2(maxX, maxY),
        new Vector2(maxX, minY),
        new Vector2(minX, maxY),
    };

    return result;
}

private static Vector3[] ConvertVector3(Vector3[] values) =>
   ConvertVector2(
      values.Select(v => new Vector2(v.X, v.Y)).ToArray()) // Convert to 2D
   .Select(v => new Vector3(v.X, v.Y, values[0].Z))
   .ToArray();

As a side note, you can simplify the ConvertVector2 function; for instance:

private static Vector2[] ConvertVector2(Vector2[] values)
{
    var xs = values.Select(v => v.X); // .ToArray() for efficiency
    var ys = values.Select(v => v.Y); // .ToArray() for efficiency
    var min = new Vector2(xs.Min(), ys.Min());
    var max = new Vector2(xs.Max(), ys.Max());
    // If your Vector2 implements IComparable, use instead:
    // var min = values.Min();
    // var max = values.Max();

    return new[]
    {
        new Vector2(min.X, min.Y),
        new Vector2(max.X, max.Y),
        new Vector2(max.X, min.Y),
        new Vector2(min.X, max.Y),
    };
}

Please note that I'm using System.Numerics.Vector* here, adjust to your Unity classes as needed (eg. lowercase X and Y properties).

A more elegant way would be to use Extensions instead.

public static class VectorExtensions
{
    public static Vector2[] ToMaxVector(this Vector2[] values)
    {
        var maxX = float.MinValue;
        var maxY = float.MinValue;
        var minX = float.MaxValue;
        var minY = float.MaxValue;

        foreach (var point in values)
        {
            maxX = Mathf.Max(point.x, maxX);
            minX = Mathf.Min(point.x, minX);
            maxY = Mathf.Max(point.y, maxY);
            minY = Mathf.Min(point.y, minY);
        }

        var result = new Vector2[4]{
            new Vector2(minX, minY), 
            new Vector2(maxX, maxY), 
            new Vector2(maxX, minY), 
            new Vector2(minX, maxY) 
        };

        return result;
    }
}

This way you reduce implementation friction because it gets added to intellisense making for easier implementation.

It still looks like duplicated code but it's code for two different things. Testability of this is also a lot easier since you are type safe. With generics you have a lot of unsafe type issues.

Then you could just use it as follows.

 var maxValues = vectors.ToMaxVector();
  • where vectors is a an array of vectors. "Vector2[]"
  • Just out of curiosity, why are you comparing the names of the types instead of something like VectorX.GetType() == typeof(T)? – Ahmed Abdelhameed Sep 19 at 11:16
  • You are missing the z-component of Vector3. – Peter B Sep 19 at 11:18
  • Sorry I am complelty doing this by hand... psuedo code.. prone to bugs- just trying to get the concept over to you. – ppumkin Sep 19 at 11:19
  • Once reason I extract the name into a variable is a force of habit (probably bad habit from the 2000's) just as an efficiency measure. Don't worry.. not required now a days.. you can compare it the way you mentioned no problem! But also remember that == measure by ref on objects (which in meta programming is the case (because we are working with objects)) but on typed object it meauses by the ToString(), which may be false on this occasion. So always test on strings, like full name or name – ppumkin Sep 19 at 11:21
  • Note that your extension method applies to Vector2 array objects, not to Vector2 objects. Anyway, extension methods do not address code factorization in this case, it simply changes the form of duplicated logic. – jnovo Sep 19 at 13:15

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