1

I would like to add a node in a sorted linked list based on the number. This is the struct:

struct node {
  int number;
  struct node *next;
}

I am able to add to the sorted linked list correctly but can't get it to change head.

Unfortunately I can't change the format of the function declaration so this is my function:

int create(struct node *head, int number) {
   struct node *newNode = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
   newNode->number = number;
   struct node *current = head;

   if (current->number == -1) {
     newNode->next = NULL;
     *head= *newNode;
     return 1;
   }

   //Checking if head's number is bigger than init
   if (current->number > number) {
     newNode->next = current;
     *head = *newNode;
   } else {
     while(current->next != NULL && (current->number <= number)) {
      current = current->next;
     }
    newNode->next = current->next;
    current->next = newNode;
   }
   return 1;
}

the call to the function is (Note I also can't change this):

struct node *list;
list = initializeList();
int num;
num = create(list, 5);
num = create(list, 1);

After the second call, the list should be 1->5. But it becomes 1->1->1->1->.....

Edit: Code to Initialize list:

struct node * initializeList() {
  struct node *head;
  head = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
  head->next = NULL;
  head->number = -1;
  return head;
}
  • Would you also post code for initializeList(), it seems relevant – rtpax Sep 19 '18 at 12:10
  • I'm not understanding why do you need this line *head = *newNode; – kiran Biradar Sep 19 '18 at 12:11
  • @kiranBiradar the line *head = *newNode is there so I can assign the head to the new node. – Ibrahim Abouhashish Sep 19 '18 at 12:22
  • @rtpax added the initializeList() code – Ibrahim Abouhashish Sep 19 '18 at 12:23
  • I am getting different behavior than you are describing. The resulting list I get is 0->5->1. Note that the 0 comes from the uninitialized value in initializeList, so may vary. – rtpax Sep 19 '18 at 12:28
1

I made a few edits to the create function to fix the problem.

First, if the head of the list has number == -1 then no new node should be allocated, since you are just replacing the number.

Second, if you need to insert a node, the previous node needs to know where to the next node goes, so you can't just replace the previous node with the new node. You need to either point the previous node to the new node and point the new node to the displaced node; or you can copy the current node into the new node, and put the number for the new node into the current, and point it to the new node. The second works better here, since it does not require changing the head (which we can't do if it needs to go at the front).

int create(struct node *head, int number) {
  struct node *current = head;

  if (current->number == -1) {
    current->number = number;//just replace the number, no need for anything else
    return 1;
  }

  //allocate only if we must insert
  struct node *newNode = malloc(sizeof(struct node));

  //no longer need to check if head
  while(current->next != NULL && (current->number <= number)) {
    current = current->next;
  }
  if(current->next == NULL && current->number < number) {//check if number needs to go at the end
    current->next = newNode;
    newNode->next = NULL;
    newNode->number = number;
  } else {
    *newNode = *current;//newNode will go after current, but with current's values
    current->number = number;//replace current with the number to "insert" it
    current->next = newNode;//point to the next node
  }
  return 1;
}
-1

assign an index value to the node and shift the other elements by one. I mean you can add one to the each value of the other element and make in iterate in a loop.

  • 3
    he shouldn't need to add indexes to get a linked list to work – rtpax Sep 19 '18 at 13:00

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