2

I just realized something while playing with timeit and and, or, any(), all() that I figured I could share here. Here is the script to measure performance:

def recursion(n):
    """A slow way to return a True or a False boolean."""
    return True if n == 0 else recursion(n-1)       

def my_function():
    """The function where you perform all(), any(), or, and."""
    a = False and recursion(10)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    import timeit
    setup = "from __main__ import my_function"
    print(timeit.timeit("my_function()", setup=setup))

And here are some timings:

a = False and recursion(10)
0.08799480279344607

a = True or recursion(10)
0.08964192798430304

As expected, True or recursion(10) as well as False and recursion(10) are very fast to compute because only the first term matters and the operation returns immediately.

a = recursion(10) or True # recursion() is False
1.4154556830951606 

a = recursion(10) and False # recursion() is True
1.364157978046478

Having or True or and False in the line does not speed up the computation here because they are evaluated second and the whole recursion has to be performed first. While annoying, it's logical and it follows operation priority rules.

What is more surprising is that all() and any() always have the worst performance regardless of the case:

a = all(i for i in (recursion(10), False))) # recursion() is False
1.8326778537880273

a = all(i for i in (False, recursion(10))) # recursion() is False
1.814645767348111

I would have expected the second evaluation to be much faster than the first one.

a = any(i for i in (recursion(10), True))) # recursion() is True
1.7959248761901563

a = any(i for i in (True, recursion(10))) # recursion() is True
1.7930442127481

Same unmet expectations here.

So it seems like any() and all() are far from being a handy way to write respectively a big or and a big and if performance matters in your application. Why is that?

Edit: based on the comments it seems the tuple generation is slow. I see no reason why Python itself could not use this:

def all_faster(*args):
    Result = True
    for arg in args:
        if not Result:
            return False
        Result = Result and arg
    return True

def any_faster(*args):
    Result = False
    for arg in args:
        if Result:
            return True
        Result = Result or arg
    return False

It's faster already than the built-in functions and seems to have the short-circuit mechanism.

a = faster_any(False, False, False, False, True)
0.39678611016915966

a = faster_any(True, False, False, False, False)
0.29465180389252055

a = faster_any(recursion(10), False) # recursion() is True
1.5922580174283212

a = faster_any(False, recursion(10)) # recursion() is True
1.5799157924820975

a = faster_all(False, recursion(10)) # recursion() is True
1.6116566893888375

a = faster_all(recursion(10), False) # recursion() is True
1.6004807187900951

Edit2: alright it's faster with arguments passed one by one but slower with generators.

  • 1
    There's lots of overhead in creating the generator. In a big application this would not be noticeable. – helper Sep 19 '18 at 13:26
  • 1
    Your slow function is evaluated before any(). Try making your function a generator. – Stephen Rauch Sep 19 '18 at 13:27
  • 1
    Just to be clear: any() IS equivalent to a chain of or and all() IS equivalent to a chain of and, including short-circuit. There will be some performance overhead related to the callable, but that's just about it. The problem resides in the way you perform the benchmark. – norok2 Sep 19 '18 at 13:47
  • If it's indeed a chain why does it use a generator at all? For some reason I think the tuple could be removed entirely. Imagine this: def any_without_tuple(*args): Result = True for arg in args: Result = Result or arg return Result. A priori it looks faster. – Guimoute Sep 19 '18 at 13:57
  • it may be faster, but it is incorrect... – norok2 Sep 19 '18 at 14:16
1

any and all short-circuit all right.

The problem is that here in both cases, you have to build the tuple prior to pass it to any so the order doesn't make a difference: the time taken is still the same. Let's decompose this with a variable:

t = (True, recursion(10))   # recursion is called
a = any(i for i in t)       # this is very fast, only boolean testing

When you're reaching the second line, the time has already been spent.

It's different with and or or which short circuit.

The case where any or all are interesting is when you're evaluating the data when you're testing:

any(recusion(x) for x in (10,20,30))

If you wanted to avoid evaluation, you could pass a tuple of lambdas (inline functions) to any and call the functions:

now:

a = any(i() for i in (lambda:recursion(10), lambda:True))) 

and:

a = any(i() for i in (lambda:True,lambda:recursion(10)))) 

have a very different execution time (the latter is instantaneous)

  • I assume the order does make a difference, but a negligible one compared to the tuple building time? – Guimoute Sep 19 '18 at 13:25
  • no, no difference, because the tuple needs to be built before any is called. – Jean-François Fabre Sep 19 '18 at 13:26
  • Interesting. It's efficient but it's shame it looks a bit heavy for what it does (essentially a different writting ofTrue and recursion(10)). – Guimoute Sep 20 '18 at 9:28
  • it's more interesting when you have more than 2 conditions :) – Jean-François Fabre Sep 20 '18 at 9:53
  • Yes :) For numerous conditions we could imagine a function any(tuple or generator) that adds those lambda under the hood to alleviate the display a bit. – Guimoute Sep 20 '18 at 11:33
2

Actually, any() IS equivalent to a chain of or and all() IS equivalent to a chain of and, including short-circuit. The problem resides in the way you perform the benchmark.

Consider the following:

def slow_boolean_gen(n, value=False):
    for x in range(n - 1):
        yield value
    yield not value

generator = slow_boolean_gen(10)

print([x for x in generator])
# [False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, True]

and the following micro-benchmarks:

%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, True); next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator)
# 492 ns ± 35.7 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, False); next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator) or next(generator)
# 1.18 µs ± 12.4 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, True); next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator)
# 1.19 µs ± 11.7 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, False); next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator) and next(generator)
# 473 ns ± 6.27 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)

%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, True); any(x for x in generator)
# 745 ns ± 15 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, False); any(x for x in generator)
# 1.29 µs ± 12.4 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, True); all(x for x in generator)
# 1.3 µs ± 22.4 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, False); all(x for x in generator)
# 721 ns ± 8.05 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)

%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, True); any([x for x in generator])
# 1.03 µs ± 28.8 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, False); any([x for x in generator])
# 1.09 µs ± 27.7 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, True); all([x for x in generator])
# 1.05 µs ± 11.1 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, False); all([x for x in generator])
# 1.02 µs ± 11.9 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)

You can clearly see that the short-circuit is working, but if you first build the list, that takes a constant time that offsets any performance gain that you would get from short-circuit.

EDIT:

A manual implementation does not buy us any performance gain:

def all_(values):
    result = True
    for value in values:
        result = result and value
        if not result:
            break
    return result

def any_(values):
    result = False
    for value in values:
        result = result or value
        if result:
            break
    return result

%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, True); any_(x for x in generator)
# 765 ns ± 6.76 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, False); any_(x for x in generator)
# 1.48 µs ± 8.97 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, True); all_(x for x in generator)
# 1.47 µs ± 5.71 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
%timeit generator = slow_boolean_gen(10, False); all_(x for x in generator)
# 765 ns ± 8.76 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)

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