We are developing a windows service that runs .net core 2.x. Following this blog post by Steve Gordon running .netcore generic host applications as a service things seem to be working beautifully... as long as we use the IServiceCollection. I prefer SimpleInjector but I'm not sure how I can use it like I do in asp.net core. I there's a way to replace the built in DI as described here Default service container replacement and I know the SI team doesn't recommend the approach ASP.NET Core MVC Integration Guide so is there a better way in this use case?

Here is what I have so far but it's uncomfortable

--main program

internal class Program
{
    private static async Task Main(string[] args)
    {
        var isService = !(Debugger.IsAttached || args.Contains("--console"));

        var builder = new HostBuilder()
            .ConfigureServices((hostContext, services) =>
            {
                services.AddHostedService<Runner>();
                //configure SimpleInjector here???
            });

        if (isService)
        {
            await builder.RunAsServiceAsync();
        }
        else
        {
            await builder.RunConsoleAsync();
        }
    }
}

Configuring the container here works more or less but the first class being created by the host (i.e. Runner in this case) gets created by the Host and injects any dependencies via the IServicesCollection. So my question is how do I have it inject from my SI container instead?

  • I'm not sure I follow your question and what the problem is you are encountering. While integrating Simple Injector with ASP.NET Core, you would never replace the built-in container, and so shouldn't you with something that runs as a service. So you'd follow an identical approach where you would plug in into the framework by replacing one of its main interception points, such as IControllerActivator. So what is preventing you from taking that approach? – Steven Sep 19 at 19:17
  • 1
    @Steven yeah I agree the question was a bit vague and I was hoping the blog post from Steven Gordon would make it clear. I have edited the question and will post the now obvious answer in a minute – Steven Sep 20 at 12:23
  • @Steven also, the host builder here doesn't have an IControllerActiviator because I'm not using ASP.NET core. :) – Steven Sep 20 at 12:29
  • But are you doing than? A request comes in, and what happens at that point? – Steven Sep 20 at 12:57
  • @Steven ah, the "requests" are actually rebus messages. So my bootstrapper configures the service bus (rebus) which does the polling and uses the SI adapter to build up the message handler dependencies as required. – Steven Sep 20 at 17:56

The obvious answer here is... Don't have any dependencies injected into the Runner. Instead Runner is the class that represents your application entry point so I configure my container there and dispose of it when the Runner is stopped. The complete code for runner...

public class Runner : IHostedService, IDisposable
{
    private Container _container;
    public Runner()
    {
        _container = new Container();
        _container.Options.DefaultScopedLifestyle = new AsyncScopedLifestyle();
    }

    public Task StartAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        Bootstrapper.Bootstrap(_container);
        return Task.CompletedTask;
    }

    public Task StopAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        return Task.CompletedTask;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _container.Dispose();
        _container = null;
    }
}

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