4

The hosting design in the ASP.NET Core have a new Generic Host now (.NET Core 2.1+) that will replace the Web Host in the future.

There are a lot of ways to start the application using the Microsoft.Extensions.Hosting interfaces IHost and IHostBuilder.

I know the difference between using async vs sync, but what are the differences between all these options? Using Run vs Start and calling on IHostBuilder vs calling on IHost?

See the options // 1, // 2, // 3 and // 4 in the code below:

using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Hosting;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Logging;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace MyNamespace
{
    class Program
    {
        static async Task Main(string[] args)
        {
            IHostBuilder builder = CreateBuilder();

            // 1 - Call Run on the builder (async)
            await builder.RunConsoleAsync();    // extension method

            // 2 - Call Start on the builder (sync)
            builder.Start();                    // extension method

            IHost host = builder.Build();       // Call Build on the builder to get a host

            // 3 - Call Run on the host (sync / async)
            host.Run();                         // extension method
            await host.RunAsync();              // extension method

            // 4 - Call Start on the host (sync / async)
            host.Start();                       // extension method
            await host.StartAsync();            // class method
        }

        private static IHostBuilder CreateBuilder() => new HostBuilder()
            .ConfigureAppConfiguration((hostingContext, config) =>
            {
                //...
            })
            .ConfigureLogging((hostingContext, logging) => {
                //...
            })
            .ConfigureServices((hostContext, services) =>
            {
                //...
                services.AddSingleton<IHostedService, MyService>();
            });
    }
}
7

// 1 - Call Run on the builder (async)

RunConsoleAsync enables console support, builds and starts the host, and waits for Ctrl+C/SIGINT or SIGTERM to shut down. So as it's expected from its name it's for hosting your app in console only (not IIS, etc)

// 2 - Call Start on the builder (sync)

just starts the host synchronously

public static IHost Start(this IHostBuilder hostBuilder)
{
    var host = hostBuilder.Build();
    host.StartAsync(CancellationToken.None).GetAwaiter().GetResult();
    return host;
}

// 3 - Call Run on the host (sync / async)

RunAsync runs the app and returns a Task that completes when the cancellation token or shutdown is triggered. Sync is just a wrapper:

public static void Run(this IHost host)
{
    host.RunAsync().GetAwaiter().GetResult();
}

// 4 - Call Start on the host (sync / async)

This method is actually starting the program and it's called eventually from any other ways.

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