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I need some help with python variables. I have a sketch that sends variables to a function called roomControl. If during this function the status has changed from a previous time then I want it to do something. At present it should printout the variable values.

I am getting the error that the status variable has not been assigned and I believe this is due to it being set outside the function. But if I set the variable within the function then this will override the functions control of these variables. (hope this makes sense)

My script is below but basicly if status changes then print out something is what I am trying to achieve

import MySQLdb

status = 0
previousStatus = 0

connSolar = MySQLdb.connect("localhost", "######", "#######", "######") 
cursSolar = connSolar.cursor()

def roomControl(name, demand, thermostat, roomTemp):
    if demand == 1 and thermostat > roomTemp:
        status = 1
    if demand == 1 and thermostat < roomTemp:
        status = 0
    if demand == 0:
        status = 0
    if (status == 1 and previousStatus == 0):
        print("Room: %s, Heating demand = %s, Thermostate = %s, Room Temp = %s, Status = %s") % (name, demand, thermostat, roomTemp, status)
        print("")
    previousStatus = status
    return (status)     

while 1:
    Ntemp = 25
    try:
        cursSolar.execute ("SELECT * FROM roomHeatingControl")
        connSolar.commit()
        for reading in cursSolar.fetchall():
            Nthermostat = reading[6]
            NSW = reading[7]
    except (MySQLdb.Error, MySQLdb.Warning) as e:
        print (e)   
    NPy_status = roomControl('Niamh', NSW, Nthermostat, Ntemp)
5
  • 1
    Please add error as well by editing your original post – mad_ Sep 19 '18 at 19:57
  • Traceback (most recent call last): File "var.py", line 35, in <module> NPy_status = roomControl('Niamh', NSW, Nthermostat, Ntemp) File "var.py", line 16, in roomControl if (status == 1 and previousStatus == 0): UnboundLocalError: local variable 'status' referenced before assignment – user2669997 Sep 19 '18 at 19:57
  • Because you assign to previousStatus in the function, it is considered by Python to be a local variable. And you are trying to use it before you have assigned it a value. Presumably you want to use the global variable; in this case, add global previousStatus at the beginning of the function, just after the def line. – kindall Sep 19 '18 at 20:01
  • What have you tried in order to narrow down the error? 95% of this code seems irrelevant, so why post it? You should learn how to cut down your code without losing the error. This will help you understand the error better. – Denziloe Sep 19 '18 at 20:01
  • What kindall said. And the same applies to status. So the names previousStatus & status inside roomControl are local to roomControl, they do not refer to the objects with the same names outside the function. – PM 2Ring Sep 19 '18 at 20:04
1

A solution is to bring in status as a global.

status = 0
previousStatus = 0
# other code
def roomControl(name, demand, thermostat, roomTemp):
    global status
    global previousStatus
    #  This will bring in both variables to be edited within the function

Good luck!

3
  • Great this works and is what I needed. I was trying global variable but was incorrectly setting it outside the function. Thank you for your help – user2669997 Sep 19 '18 at 20:10
  • 1
    What you "need" is to understand variable scope, otherwise you will experience hundreds more errors like these and not know why. – Denziloe Sep 19 '18 at 20:14
  • Glad I could help! I had this problem about a year ago, and setting the variable as global outside the function worked for me, but people all over SO said it was a bad idea:) It was a really short bit of code though, so it wasn't a big deal. – William Sep 19 '18 at 20:15
2

This is related global, local variable types. You can find here https://www.programiz.com/python-programming/global-keyword explanation.

You need only define "status" as a global.

0
1

You should learn to cut out bits of your code and simplify it without losing the error. That way you will nail down the error.

Ultimately you will end up with code like this:

status = 0

def f():
    print(status)

f()
Out: 0

As expected, the function can't find status, so it looks in the global scope, finds it, and prints it.

status = 0

def f():
    status = 1
    print(status)

f()
Out: 1

Again as expected. We've defined a local variable status for f, so f just uses that when it prints.

status = 0

def f():
    print(status)
    status = 1

f()
UnboundLocalError: local variable 'status' referenced before assignment

Now it becomes clear why there is an error. The only difference from the second example is that we've swapped the order so that status is defined in f only after it is used in print, and the only difference from the first example is that we define status inside f. So this is the problem: when we define a variable inside a function -- anywhere inside a function -- Python decides that that variable must be local to the function. So when it hits the print function, it looks for a local variable status, but it hasn't been defined yet. Hence the error. Similar to if you ran this code:

print(status)
status = 1
NameError: name 'status' is not defined
1

Avoid implementing a solution where you need to access the Global variables directly. One way is to change to a better data structure where possible. You can define your statuses as a list or dict (I'd prefer dict) and you can access them directly inside the function without passing them. Here is the small example to make things bit more clear

d={'status':0, 'prev_status':0} # Intialize the dict
def myfunc():
    d['status']=5 # make modifications
myfunc()
print(d) # {'status': 5, 'prev_status': 0}
1
  • Hi mad, yes this works as well and I understand what you are doing. This does seem more complex for what I am doing. The variables I am using will only be used in the roomControl function so why is using the global variable such a problem – user2669997 Sep 19 '18 at 20:26

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