Android Studio creates this code when you create a Fragment using File -> New -> Fragment

override fun onCreate(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState)
    arguments?.let {
        param1 = it.getString(ARG_PARAM1)
        param2 = it.getString(ARG_PARAM2)
    }
}

Isn't it better to use run on arguments since you can omit it? I know you use let for null-safety but run also gives you Bundle, not Bundle?

override fun onCreate(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState)
    arguments?.run {
        param1 = getString(ARG_PARAM1)
        param2 = getString(ARG_PARAM2)
    }
}

Is there a particular reason why it uses let instead of run?

  • I don't know if this is a reason, but the version with run could potentially be confusing if you'd want to call the method getString(int) from the fragment itself. With let you have the it variable to help out understanding that the method being called belongs to the Bundle class. – Fred Sep 20 at 2:06
  • No reason, they just like it. They aren't as fun in code review though. I'd name it .let { args -> – EpicPandaForce Sep 20 at 18:22

FWIW, neither of these really make sense, since they both return a value.

Since you don't want to return a value in this case:

  • If you want to use it, use also instead of let.
  • If you want to use the receiver, use apply instead of run.

And...no, I don't know why Android Studio would use let instead of run.

  • they also return a value – osrl Sep 19 at 20:53
  • Alright, technically yes, what I meant is the last value of the lambda isn't used. Like you use let or run if you want to do some operation and then "return" the last value of the block. – Max Sep 20 at 3:09

You saw those 'it' on let mate? This is the only thing that these two are different about. But, because of that, they have different uses. First of, on run, calling 'this' will point out to the object that called run. thus, primarily, all properties or methods that the object has will be called. As an example:

...
mObject?.run {
    hello();
}
...

This will call the hello method of the object. But, lets say its the same scenario but you want to call a function with the same name as the method of the object. As an example:

...
fun hello() = print("not the hello from that object")
...
mObject?.run {
    hello();
}
...

This will still work, but, you will still run the hello from the object. Which to as, when you use let, you could choose wether to use the method the object has or the function.
P.S. run can run along on its own while let needs to be accessed from a variable etc.

Bonus

There are two more to this option which are apply and also. Now, what differs these two from let and run? let and run can return themselves or anything else, or fairly non at all. While apply and also will always return the object used. And the counterpart of let is also and apply is run.

Second bonus

lets say you want to check if an object is null before using it, then set its properties that are not in the constructor.

var mObject: MObject = mObjectUndecided?.also {
    // Do Something
}

But, what if mObjectUndecided is null?

val mObjectUndecided: MObject? = null
var mObject: MObject = mObjectUndecided?.apply{
    // Do Something
} ?: run {
    MObject().also {
        // Do Something
    }
}

But, what if you need to call a function / variable that is the same as a mathod / property of the object?

val mObjectUndecided: MObject? = null
var mObject: MObject = mObjectUndecided?.let{
    // Do Something
    it // return it if its not null
} ?: run {
    MObject().also {
        // Do Something
    }
}

But, what if MObject is constructed like this:

class MObject {
    var name: String? = null
    var mObjectNext: MObject? = null
}

Then, you will have to nest it(run, let, apply, also). But, somewhere within the nest, you want to call an object from the higher heirarchy?

var mObject: MObject = mObjectUndecided?.let{ mObject1 ->
    // Do Something
    mObject1.mObjectNext?.let { mObject2 ->
        // Do Something
        mObject2.mObjectNext?.let { mObject3 ->
            // Do Something
        }
        // Do Something
    }
    // Do Something
    it // return it if its not null
} ?: run {
    MObject().also {
        // Do Something
    }
}

P.P.S. there is another one called with, it doesn't matter enough for this context as i talked about the extension functions here, but it's something worth reading.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.