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I know I can use the following properties to automatically create a JavaMailSender bean:

spring.mail.host=hostname
spring.mail.port=587
spring.mail.username=username
spring.mail.password=password

However, how can I define these properties to create two JavaMailSender beans so I can send emails from different SMTP servers?

I tried defining the following properties:

# Properties for sender 1
spring.mail.host=hostname
spring.mail.port=587
spring.mail.username=username
spring.mail.password=password

# Properties for sender 2
spring.mail.host1=hostname2
spring.mail.port1=587
spring.mail.username1=username2
spring.mail.password1=password2

However, this does not work as I expected, so how can I create two JavaMailSender beans using Spring boot?

  • Are you paid for this or it's a project for school? – dbl Sep 20 '18 at 11:33
  • Just a hint: instead of using email1, email2 use collections: google.com/… – dbl Sep 20 '18 at 11:35
  • 1
    @dbl How would you apply those collections if spring.mail.*/MailProperties does not support collections? Be aware that these are not just normal properties, these are properties that are used by the MailAutoConfiguration and you can't just randomly change them. – g00glen00b Sep 20 '18 at 11:39
  • Whoops, never used the built in mailing system so wasn't aware of that. Still there are various techniques to handle this. Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/29220709/… – dbl Sep 20 '18 at 11:55
  • 1
    @dbl True, there are certainly various solutions to this problem, but the initially provided hint wasn't one of them. While the duplicate shows how you can do this with Spring, I'm leaning more towards tailoring this question and the answers specifically to Spring boot rather than the Spring framework in general. – g00glen00b Sep 20 '18 at 12:08
8

Creating the beans

Spring boot will only initialize one JavaMailSender as soon as it finds the spring.mail.* properties. If you need multiple ones, you have to define these beans by yourself. If you only need the properties host, port, username and password, you could use this simple configuration:

@Configuration
public class MailConfiguration {

    @Bean
    @ConfigurationProperties(prefix = "spring.mail.primary")
    public JavaMailSender primarySender() {
        return new JavaMailSenderImpl();
    }

    @Bean
    @ConfigurationProperties(prefix = "spring.mail.secondary")
    public JavaMailSender secondarySender() {
        return new JavaMailSenderImpl();
    }
}

However, this will not work if you also want to configure spring.mail.properties.* as well. In order to do that, your configuration will be a bit more complex, since you'll have to do the following:

  • Create two beans of MailProperties using the same @ConfigurationProperties as you can see above.
  • Use the MailProperties in a similar way as Spring boot does within MailSenderPropertiesConfiguration.

Configuration

After that, you can use the spring.mail.primary.* properties and spring.mail.secondary.* properties as you're used to. For example:

spring.mail.primary.host=host1
spring.mail.primary.port=port1
spring.mail.primary.username=username1
spring.mail.primary.password=password1
spring.mail.secondary.host=host2
spring.mail.secondary.port=port2
spring.mail.secondary.username=username2
spring.mail.secondary.password=password2

Usage

After that, you can autowire both primarySender and secondarySender. Make sure to use the @Qualifier annotation to tell Spring which is which:

@Service
public class MailService {
    private JavaMailSender primarySender;
    private JavaMailSender secondarySender;

    public MailService(
        @Qualifier("primarySender") JavaMailSender primarySender,
        @Qualifier("secondarySender") JavaMailSender secondarySender) {
        this.primarySender = primarySender;
        this.secondarySender = secondarySender;
    }
}
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