2

I'm trying to make a compiler in Rust, but I'm having problems understanding how to define a type hierarchy using enumerations. We have for example:

enum Thing {
    Animal,
    Plant,
}

struct Plant {
    color: String,
}

enum Animal {
    Dog,
    Cat,
}

struct Cat {
    name: String,
}

struct Dog {
    name: String,
}

let x = Dog { name: john };

If I do pattern matching, will Dog be considered of Animal type (or Thing type)? How do I create this type hierarchy using enums and structs? My type hierarchy has many levels of depth.

  • As it stands, your types are completely independent of one another. Also, Rust doesn't support the notion of inheritance. I would suggest looking into using traits if you want to have some idea of sub typing. – squiguy Sep 20 '18 at 23:38
  • You may find users.rust-lang.org/t/how-to-do-c-like-inheritance/20545 very interesting. – hellow Sep 21 '18 at 6:25
6

When you look at this piece of code:

enum Thing {
    Animal,
    Plant,
}

struct Plant {
    color: String,
}

You see the word Plant twice. The important thing to note is that the two Plants are different, unrelated things. Just because they have the same name doesn't mean that they represent the same thing, and in fact they don't really have the same name when you take the fully qualified name: the first one is ::Thing::Plant and the second one is just plain ::Plant.

If you want to link the two, you will need to make it explicit with:

enum Thing {
    Animal(Animal),
    Plant(Plant),
}

For more details, you can look at the IpAddr example in the Rust book.

  • This is close, but does not directly answer OPs question. – Shepmaster Sep 21 '18 at 12:36
  • @Shepmaster OP asked "How do I create this type hierarchy using enums and structs?" This is one way to do it. – Jmb Sep 21 '18 at 12:52
2

"many levels of depth" is often a bad idea even in languages with explicit support for inheritance.

If you are porting some code to Rust, you might want to consider improving your design by involving concepts more natural in it, like traits, generic types, closures and more.

  • 2
    This does not directly answer OPs question. – Shepmaster Sep 21 '18 at 12:35

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