104

I'm trying to find the best way to format an sql query string. When I'm debugging my application I'd like to log to file all the sql query strings, and it is important that the string is properly formated.

Option 1

def myquery():
    sql = "select field1, field2, field3, field4 from table where condition1=1 and condition2=2"
    con = mymodule.get_connection()
    ...
  • This is good for printing the sql string.
  • It is not a good solution if the string is long and not fits the standard width of 80 characters.

Option 2

def query():
    sql = """
        select field1, field2, field3, field4
        from table
        where condition1=1
        and condition2=2"""
    con = mymodule.get_connection()
    ...
  • Here the code is clear but when you print the sql query string you get all these annoying white spaces.

    u'\nselect field1, field2, field3, field4\n_____from table\n____where condition1=1 \n_____and condition2=2'

Note: I have replaced white spaces with underscore _, because they are trimmed by the editor

Option 3

def query():
    sql = """select field1, field2, field3, field4
from table
where condition1=1
and condition2=2"""
    con = mymodule.get_connection()
    ...
  • I don't like this option because it breaks the clearness of the well tabulated code.

Option 4

def query():
    sql = "select field1, field2, field3, field4 " \
          "from table " \
          "where condition1=1 " \
          "and condition2=2 "
    con = mymodule.get_connection()    
    ...
  • I don't like this option because all the extra typing in each line and is difficult to edit the query also.

For me the best solution would be Option 2 but I don't like the extra whitespaces when I print the sql string.

Do you know of any other options?

  • This is what the Psycopg people call a a naïve approach to the composition of query strings, e.g. using string concatenation - initd.org/psycopg/docs/… . Instead use query parameters to avoid SQL injection attacks and to automatically convert Python objects to and from SQL literals. stackoverflow.com/questions/3134691/… – Matthew Cornell Jun 10 '13 at 13:22
  • This question is actually not specific to SQL queries, but applies generally to formatting multi-line strings in Python. The SQL tag should be removed. – cstork Jan 12 '14 at 21:36

11 Answers 11

138

Sorry for posting to such an old thread -- but as someone who also shares a passion for pythonic 'best', I thought I'd share our solution.

The solution is to build SQL statements using python's String Literal Concatenation (http://docs.python.org/), which could be qualified a somewhere between Option 2 and Option 4

Code Sample:

sql = ("SELECT field1, field2, field3, field4 "
       "FROM table "
       "WHERE condition1=1 "
       "AND condition2=2;")

Works as well with f-strings:

fields = "field1, field2, field3, field4"
table = "table"
conditions = "condition1=1 AND condition2=2"

sql = (f"SELECT {fields} "
       f"FROM {table} "
       f"WHERE {conditions};")

Pros:

  1. It retains the pythonic 'well tabulated' format, but does not add extraneous space characters (which pollutes logging).
  2. It avoids the backslash continuation ugliness of Option 4, which makes it difficult to add statements (not to mention white-space blindness).
  3. And further, it's really simple to expand the statement in VIM (just position the cursor to the insert point, and press SHIFT-O to open a new line).
  • 2
    If this is for printing, I think a better alternative is to write it as mutiline string with """ and use textwrap.dedent() before outputting – slezica Jul 12 '14 at 8:24
  • I played with that option, but it made log output multiline as well. When tracking a db chatty app, this caused volumous output. – user590028 Aug 13 '14 at 16:17
  • 1
    This is an old thread, but I've been using this format as a best practice, however it gets tedious with longer queries – Jabda Sep 19 '17 at 21:55
  • 9
    Shouldn't we always use double quotes "sql query" to avoid messing with SQL strings (which use single quotes as standard)? – tpvasconcelos Jan 22 '19 at 12:50
19

You've obviously considered lots of ways to write the SQL such that it prints out okay, but how about changing the 'print' statement you use for debug logging, rather than writing your SQL in ways you don't like? Using your favourite option above, how about a logging function such as this:

def debugLogSQL(sql):
     print ' '.join([line.strip() for line in sql.splitlines()]).strip()

sql = """
    select field1, field2, field3, field4
    from table"""
if debug:
    debugLogSQL(sql)

This would also make it trivial to add additional logic to split the logged string across multiple lines if the line is longer than your desired length.

11

Cleanest way I have come across is inspired by the sql style guide.

sql = """
    SELECT field1, field2, field3, field4
      FROM table
     WHERE condition1 = 1
       AND condition2 = 2;
"""

Essentially, the keywords that begin a clause should be right-aligned and the field names etc, should be left aligned. This looks very neat and is easier to debug as well.

2
sql = ("select field1, field2, field3, field4 "
       "from table "
       "where condition1={} "
       "and condition2={}").format(1, 2)

Output: 'select field1, field2, field3, field4 from table 
         where condition1=1 and condition2=2'

if the value of condition should be a string, you can do like this:

sql = ("select field1, field2, field3, field4 "
       "from table "
       "where condition1='{0}' "
       "and condition2='{1}'").format('2016-10-12', '2017-10-12')

Output: "select field1, field2, field3, field4 from table where
         condition1='2016-10-12' and condition2='2017-10-12'"
  • 5
    Please never ever do this. It's called SQL injection and it's really dangerous. Pretty much every Python database library provides a facility for using parameters. If you catch yourself using format() with SQL strings, it's a major code smell. – mattmc3 Jun 21 '18 at 0:29
  • I don't think we can not use it, you have to validate parameters before use it, and you should know what you pass. – pangpang Jun 25 '18 at 14:39
  • Validating is a lot more error prone than just using where condition1=:field1 and then passing in the values as parameters. If you are using .format(), there's going to be a way to pop a ';DROP TABLE Users into your SQL. Have a look PEP-249 for how to use parameters correctly. python.org/dev/peps/pep-0249/#paramstyle – mattmc3 Jun 25 '18 at 18:53
2

You can use inspect.cleandoc to nicely format your printed SQL statement.

This works very well with your option 2.

Note: the print("-"*40) is only to demonstrate the superflous blank lines if you do not use cleandoc.

from inspect import cleandoc
def query():
    sql = """
        select field1, field2, field3, field4
        from table
        where condition1=1
        and condition2=2
    """

    print("-"*40)
    print(sql)
    print("-"*40)
    print(cleandoc(sql))
    print("-"*40)

query()

Output:

----------------------------------------

        select field1, field2, field3, field4
        from table
        where condition1=1
        and condition2=2

----------------------------------------
select field1, field2, field3, field4
from table
where condition1=1
and condition2=2
----------------------------------------

From the docs:

inspect.cleandoc(doc)

Clean up indentation from docstrings that are indented to line up with blocks of code.

All leading whitespace is removed from the first line. Any leading whitespace that can be uniformly removed from the second line onwards is removed. Empty lines at the beginning and end are subsequently removed. Also, all tabs are expanded to spaces.

0

To avoid formatting entirely, I think a great solution is to use procedures.

Calling a procedure gives you the result of whatever query you want to put in this procedure. You can actually process multiple queries within a procedure. The call will just return the last query that was called.

MYSQL

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS example;
 DELIMITER //
 CREATE PROCEDURE example()
   BEGIN
   SELECT 2+222+2222+222+222+2222+2222 AS this_is_a_really_long_string_test;
   END //
 DELIMITER;

#calling the procedure gives you the result of whatever query you want to put in this procedure. You can actually process multiple queries within a procedure. The call just returns the last query result
 call example;

Python

sql =('call example;')
0

Using 'sqlparse' library we can format the sqls.

>>> import sqlparse
>>> raw = 'select * from foo; select * from bar;'
>>> print(sqlparse.format(raw, reindent=True, keyword_case='upper'))
SELECT *
FROM foo;

SELECT *
FROM bar;

Ref: https://pypi.org/project/sqlparse/

-1

you could put the field names into an array "fields", and then:


sql = 'select %s from table where condition1=1 and condition2=2' % (
 ', '.join(fields))
  • if your conditions list grows, you could do the same, using ' and '.join(conditions) – jcomeau_ictx Mar 9 '11 at 9:26
  • with your solution, the query would be even more difficult to edit than with Option_4, and it would be difficult to read also. – ssoler Mar 10 '11 at 8:57
  • @ssoler, that depends on how one does things. I declare few variables in my programs, and use arrays of strings instead, which makes methods like the above very useful and maintainable, at least by me. – jcomeau_ictx Mar 10 '11 at 17:37
-1

I would suggest sticking to option 2 (I'm always using it for queries any more complex than SELECT * FROM table) and if you want to print it in a nice way you may always use a separate module.

-1

For short queries that can fit on one or two lines, I use the string literal solution in the top-voted solution above. For longer queries, I break them out to .sql files. I then use a wrapper function to load the file and execute the script, something like:

script_cache = {}
def execute_script(cursor,script,*args,**kwargs):
    if not script in script_cache:
        with open(script,'r') as s:
            script_cache[script] = s
    return cursor.execute(script_cache[script],*args,**kwargs)

Of course this often lives inside a class so I don't usually have to pass cursor explicitly. I also generally use codecs.open(), but this gets the general idea across. Then SQL scripts are completely self-contained in their own files with their own syntax highlighting.

-2
sql = """\
select field1, field2, field3, field4
from table
where condition1=1
and condition2=2
"""

[edit in responese to comment]
Having an SQL string inside a method does NOT mean that you have to "tabulate" it:

>>> class Foo:
...     def fubar(self):
...         sql = """\
... select *
... from frobozz
... where zorkmids > 10
... ;"""
...         print sql
...
>>> Foo().fubar()
select *
from frobozz
where zorkmids > 10
;
>>>
  • IMO this is the same as Option_2 – ssoler Mar 10 '11 at 9:08
  • @ssoler: Your Option_2 has leading spaces on all lines; note that your example omits the leading spaces before select. My answer doesn't have leading spaces. What lead you to form the opinion that they are the same? – John Machin Mar 12 '11 at 6:12
  • If you put your sql string inside a method you will have to tabulate all the lines (Option_2). One possible solution to this is Option_3. – ssoler Mar 14 '11 at 12:10
  • @ssoler: Sorry, I don't understand that remark. Please look at my updated answer. – John Machin Mar 15 '11 at 11:19
  • Your updated answer is my Option_3, isn't it? I don't like this option because it breaks the clearness of the well tabulated code. – ssoler Mar 18 '11 at 9:08

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