30

I've been doing c# for a long time, and have never come across an easy way to just new up a hash.

I've recently become acquainted with the ruby syntax of hashes and wonder, does anyone know of a simple way to declare a hash as a literal, without doing all the add calls.

{ "whatever" => {i => 1}; "and then something else" => {j => 2}};
34

If you're using C# 3.0 (.NET 3.5) then you can use collection initializers. They're not quite as terse as in Ruby but still an improvement.

This example is based on the MSDN Example

var students = new Dictionary<int, StudentName>()
{
    { 111, new StudentName {FirstName="Sachin", LastName="Karnik", ID=211}},
    { 112, new StudentName {FirstName="Dina", LastName="Salimzianova", ID=317, }},
    { 113, new StudentName {FirstName="Andy", LastName="Ruth", ID=198, }}
};
  • 3
    BTW: VisualStudio/ReSharper tells me, that the parentheses in new Dictionary<int, StudentName>() are optional and redundant. Saves two characters ;) – Daren Thomas Jun 10 '09 at 15:59
7

When I'm not able to use C# 3.0, I use a helper function that translates a set of parameters into a dictionary.

public IDictionary<KeyType, ValueType> Dict<KeyType, ValueType>(params object[] data)
{
    Dictionary<KeyType, ValueType> dict = new Dictionary<KeyType, ValueType>((data == null ? 0 :data.Length / 2));
    if (data == null || data.Length == 0) return dict;

    KeyType key = default(KeyType);
    ValueType value = default(ValueType);

    for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
    {
        if (i % 2 == 0)
            key = (KeyType) data[i];
        else
        {
            value = (ValueType) data[i];
            dict.Add(key, value);
        }
    }

    return dict;
}

Use like this:

IDictionary<string,object> myDictionary = Dict<string,object>(
    "foo",    50,
    "bar",    100
);
1

Since C# 3.0 (.NET 3.5) hashtable literals can be specified like so:

var ht = new Hashtable {
    { "whatever", new Hashtable {
            {"i", 1} 
    } },
    { "and then something else", new Hashtable { 
            {"j",  2}
    } }
};
-1
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace Dictionary
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Program p = new Program();                
            Dictionary<object, object > d = p.Dic<object, object>("Age",32,"Height",177,"wrest",36);//(un)comment
            //Dictionary<object, object> d = p.Dic<object, object>();//(un)comment

            foreach(object o in d)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(" {0}",o.ToString());
            }
            Console.ReadLine();    
        }

        public Dictionary<K, V> Dic<K, V>(params object[] data)
        {               
            //if (data.Length == 0 || data == null || data.Length % 2 != 0) return null;
            if (data.Length == 0 || data == null || data.Length % 2 != 0) return new Dictionary<K,V>(1){{ (K)new Object(), (V)new object()}};

            Dictionary<K, V> dc = new Dictionary<K, V>(data.Length / 2);
            int i = 0;
            while (i < data.Length)
            {
                dc.Add((K)data[i], (V)data[++i]);
                i++;    
            }
            return dc;            
        }
    }
}

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