21

I want to shorten a number to the first significant digit that is not 0. The digits behind should be rounded.

Examples:

0.001 -> 0.001
0.00367 -> 0.004
0.00337 -> 0.003
0.000000564 -> 0.0000006
0.00000432907543029 ->  0.000004

Currently I have the following procedure:

if (value < (decimal) 0.01)
{
    value = Math.Round(value, 4);
}

Note:

  • numbers will always be positive
  • the number of significant digits will always be 1
  • values larger 0.01 will always be rounded to two decimal places, hence the if < 0.01

As you can see from the examples above, a rounding to 4 Decimal places might not be enough and the value might vary greatly.

6
  • 6
    Have a look here: round-a-double-to-x-significant-figures Sep 21, 2018 at 9:50
  • 2
    @AaronHayman: This is decimal rather than double, and the number of significant digits isn't necessarily known - I suspect the OP doesn't want to round 123.456 to 100 for example. (Although we'll see...)
    – Jon Skeet
    Sep 21, 2018 at 9:51
  • 4
    What do you want to do for values that aren't between -1 and 1? For example, what would the result for 123.456 be?
    – Jon Skeet
    Sep 21, 2018 at 9:52
  • 1
    I was expecting some solution that uses GetBits to be faster, but (it seems that) the mantissa are not necessarily normalized, it's no easier than finding number of decimal places of the mantissa (still, some bit-scan-reverse hack may work)
    – user202729
    Sep 21, 2018 at 11:01
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Round a double to x significant figures
    – mmmmmm
    Sep 21, 2018 at 13:32

5 Answers 5

21

I would declare precision variable and use a iteration multiplies that variable by 10 with the original value it didn't hit, that precision will add 1.

then use precision variable be Math.Round second parameter.

I had added some modifications to the method which can support not only zero decimal points but also all decimal numbers.

static decimal RoundFirstSignificantDigit(decimal input) {

    if(input == 0)
       return input;

    int precision = 0;
    var val = input - Math.Round(input,0);
    while (Math.Abs(val) < 1)
    {
        val *= 10;
        precision++;
    }
    return Math.Round(input, precision);
}

I would write an extension method for this function.

public static class FloatExtension
{
    public static decimal RoundFirstSignificantDigit(this decimal input)
    {
        if(input == 0)
            return input;

        int precision = 0;
        var val = input - Math.Round(input,0);
        while (Math.Abs(val) < 1)
        {
            val *= 10;
            precision++;
        }
        return Math.Round(input, precision);
    }
}   

then use like

decimal input = 0.00001;
input.RoundFirstSignificantDigit();

c# online

Result

(-0.001m).RoundFirstSignificantDigit()                  -0.001
(-0.00367m).RoundFirstSignificantDigit()                -0.004
(0.000000564m).RoundFirstSignificantDigit()             0.0000006
(0.00000432907543029m).RoundFirstSignificantDigit()     0.000004
10
  • 4
    Note that this would require tweaking for negative values.
    – Jon Skeet
    Sep 21, 2018 at 10:08
  • 1
    Math.Abs(val)<1? Sep 21, 2018 at 10:18
  • @AccessDenied Yes I think just compare absolute value
    – D-Shih
    Sep 21, 2018 at 10:22
  • 1
    The current solution has aggregated floating-point rounding issues. It would be better to create an integer loop variable, then each iteration multiply that variable by 10 and multiply that with the original value. Also ByFirstPrecision is a horrible name - maybe something like RoundFirstSignificantDigit? Sep 21, 2018 at 14:35
  • 1
    Very good approach, thank you! Note that it would go into an infinite loop with 0. Apr 3 at 5:49
2

Something like that ?

    public decimal SpecialRound(decimal value) 
    {
        int posDot = value.ToString().IndexOf('.'); // Maybe use something about cultural (in Fr it's ",")
        if(posDot == -1)
            return value;

        int posFirstNumber = value.ToString().IndexOfAny(new char[9] {'1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9'}, posDot);

        return Math.Round(value, posFirstNumber);
    }
1
var value = 0.000000564;

int cnt = 0;
bool hitNum = false;
var tempVal = value;
while (!hitNum)
{
    if(tempVal > 1)
    {
        hitNum = true;
    }
    else
    {
        tempVal *= 10;
        cnt++;
    }
}

var newValue = (decimal)Math.Round(value, cnt);
0
1

code is from R but the algo should be obvious

> x = 0.0004932
> y = log10(x)
> z = ceiling(y)
> a = round(10^(y-z),1)
> finally = a*10^(z)
> finally
[1] 5e-04

the following was basically already provided by Benjamin K

At the risk of being labelled a complete wacko, I would cheerfully announce that regexp is your friend. Convert your number to a char string, search for the location of the first char that is neither "." nor "0" , grab the char at that location and the next char behind it, convert them to a number, round, and (because you were careful), multiply the result by $10^{-(number of zeros you found between "." and the first number)}$

1
  • hmmm... looks like I was ninja'd by Benjamin K. Sorry about that. Sep 21, 2018 at 17:19
0

Another approach

    decimal RoundToFirstNonNullDecimal(decimal value)
    {
        var nullDecimals = value.ToString().Split('.').LastOrDefault()?.TakeWhile(c => c == '0').Count();
        var roundTo = nullDecimals.HasValue && nullDecimals >= 1 ? nullDecimals.Value + 1 : 2;
        return Math.Round(value, roundTo);
    }

Result

        Console.WriteLine(RoundToFirstNonNullDecimal(0.001m));                0.001
        Console.WriteLine(RoundToFirstNonNullDecimal(0.00367m));              0.004
        Console.WriteLine(RoundToFirstNonNullDecimal(0.000000564m));          0.0000006
        Console.WriteLine(RoundToFirstNonNullDecimal(0.00000432907543029m));  0.000004
        Console.WriteLine(RoundToFirstNonNullDecimal(0.12m));                 0.12
        Console.WriteLine(RoundToFirstNonNullDecimal(1.232m));                1.23
        Console.WriteLine(RoundToFirstNonNullDecimal(7));                     7.00
2
  • Your results don't match the criteria of "values larger 0.01 will always be rounded to two decimal places". The last two examples should be 1.23 and 7.00
    – Glen Yates
    Sep 21, 2018 at 17:14
  • you're right @GlenYates, for some reason I missed that requirement, I've edited my answer now.However this is a way slower solution than the accepted one, which I also upvoted!
    – crazy_p
    Sep 23, 2018 at 21:08

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