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I want to create an implementation of the C strcat function to concatenate 2 strings without modifying either input string. This is what I have so far

char *my_strcat(char* s1, char* s2)
{
  char* p = malloc(strlen(s1) + strlen(s2) + 1);
  while (*s1 != '\0')
    *p++ = *s1++;
  while (*s2 != '\0')
    *p++ = *s2++;
  *p++ = '\0';
  return p;
}

I want to populate p with all the characters in s1 and s2, but this code just returns nothing. Could use some help.

  • 2
    A little rubber duck debugging should help you understand your problem. – Some programmer dude Sep 22 '18 at 16:16
  • 3
    Rubber duck debugging ... or stepping through the code with a debugger. Either should point to the problem - returning "p" after it's been incremented, instead of the original "p" returned by malloc(). Also: HostileFork's suggestion of const is definitely a good idea. – paulsm4 Sep 22 '18 at 16:40
  • char *my_strcat(char* s1, char* s2) { if (char* p = (char*)malloc(strlen(s1) + strlen(s2) + 1)) { char c, *sz = p; do { *p++ = c = *s1++; } while (c); p--; do { *p++ = c = *s2++; } while (c); return sz; } return 0; } – RbMm Sep 22 '18 at 16:45
  • What's wrong with the code? Looking at it, it ought to concatenate the two strings, and you don't alter the input either. Thus, what's the problem? – Michael Beer Sep 22 '18 at 16:58
3

Since you are incrementing the p in the concatenation process.

*p++ = *s1++; 

and

*p++ = '\0'; //don't do p++ here

p will be pointing to to beyond it's allocated memory after concatenation.

Just add one dummy pointer pointing to start of p and return it.

Please find sample code below.

char *my_strcat(const char* s1,const char* s2)
{
  char *p = malloc(strlen(s1) + strlen(s2) + 1);

  char *start = p;
  if (p != NULL)
  {
       while (*s1 != '\0')
       *p++ = *s1++;
       while (*s2 != '\0')
       *p++ = *s2++;
      *p = '\0';
 }

  return start;
}
  • not const correct – P__J__ Sep 22 '18 at 16:57
  • multiple returns in such a elementary function - not too good – P__J__ Sep 22 '18 at 16:59
3

I want to populate p with all the characters in s1 and s2, but this code just returns nothing. Could use some help.

You start with a malloc'd pointer, then are incrementing p as you go along.

At the end of the routine, what would you expect this p to point at?

Going with this approach, you'd need to remember the pointer you had malloc'd and return that.

You might find that if you give your variables more meaningful names--at least when starting out--you can reason about it better.

Also, since you're not modifying the inputs, you should mark them as const. This communicates your intention better--and gives the compile-time check for what you are actually trying to accomplish. It's especially important if you're going to be reusing a name like strcat which has existing expectations. (Reusing that name is another thing you might reconsider.)

char *my_strcat(const char* s1, const char* s2)
{
  char* result = malloc(strlen(s1) + strlen(s2) + 1);

  // To satisfy @P__J__ I will expand on this by saying that
  // Your interface should document what the behavior is when
  // malloc fails and `result` is NULL.  Depending on the
  // overall needs of your program, this might mean returning
  // NULL from my_strcat itself, terminating the program, etc.
  // Read up on memory management in other questions.

  char* dest = result;
  while (*s1 != '\0')
     *dest++ = *s1++;
  while (*s2 != '\0')
      *dest++ = *s2++;
  *dest++ = '\0';
  return result;
}
  • no malloc result check – P__J__ Sep 22 '18 at 17:02
  • @P__J__ Valid to bring up, but can't address everything in one question. How about what to do when the string lengths are long enough to overflow a size_t when summed? What to do in response to a malloc has to do with your entire application's worldview of what to do in such cases. e.g. not necessarily good to propagate the concern by returning null if malloc returned null; it may be that a malloc wrapper should be used which terminates the program on memory exhaustion. So valid, but in Q&A on stackoverflow one tries to pick the points relevant to the topic, question isn't about malloc. – HostileFork Sep 22 '18 at 17:13
  • 1
    But it is huge problem in the OPs code. You should not show bad code as an example as the answers are read by the beginners. – P__J__ Sep 22 '18 at 17:16
  • 2
    @P__J__ Well "huge" might be your perspective. But writing programs that can gracefully operate when they run out of memory is only one axis of evaluating fitness for a program; and not every task justifies the effort--nor will making a routine return NULL necessarily "solve" the issue. You didn't respond to my numeric overflow example, but overflow is a real thing too, isn't it? I'll stand by saying that going into an essay about the different options of exception handling for malloc is a topic in its own right, and tangential to the question being asked. – HostileFork Sep 22 '18 at 17:38
2

Your are moving pointer *p itself hence even the data is copied, it (pointer p) has already been placed ahead, so instead doing that make another pointer to the memory do that:

char *my_strcat(char* s1, char* s2)
{
     char* p = malloc(strlen(s1) + strlen(s2) + 1);
     char *c=p;    //RATHER THAN POINTER P, POINTER C WILL TRAVEL/MOVE
     while (*s1 != '\0')
          *(c++) = *(s1++);
     printf("%s\n\n",p);
     while (*s2 != '\0')
          *(c++) = *(s2++);
     *c = '\0';
     return p;
}

So in this case pointer p still remains at its original position, pointing to the beginning of the memory space.

  • 2
    The parentheses in *(c++) are not idiomatic C, though they're correct. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 22 '18 at 16:32
  • no malloc check. Wrong. NULL pointer assignment very likely. – P__J__ Sep 22 '18 at 16:54
-1

Another answer. This time no without explicit temporary char pointer to save the original one. And const correct types + malloc check.

Much more compiler optimizer friendly :)

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>


static inline char *strcpys(char *dest, const char *src)
{
    while(*dest++ = *src++);
    return dest;
}

char *mystrcat(const char *str1, const char *str2)
{
    char *result = malloc(strlen(str1) + strlen(str2) + 1);

    if(result)
    {
        strcpys(strcpys(result, str1) - 1, str2);
    }
    return result;
}

int main()
{
    char *str1 = "12345";
    char *str2 = "ABCDE";
    char *dest;

    printf("%s + %s = %s\n", str1, str2, (dest = mystrcat(str1, str2)) ? dest : "malloc error");

    free(dest);
    return 0;
}
  • You could have just used indexed(ptr[i++]) approach if you wanted to avoid saving the pointer? Although I love your answers it is always sort of out of box :) – kiran Biradar Sep 22 '18 at 16:54
  • @kiranBiradar no as it makes code slower. – P__J__ Sep 22 '18 at 16:55
  • Yes of course. +1 for the same. – kiran Biradar Sep 22 '18 at 17:13
  • DV = revenge one? – P__J__ Sep 22 '18 at 17:19
  • I didn't get you – kiran Biradar Sep 22 '18 at 17:20

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