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I'm attempting to build a 3D voxel based game engine to learn how to use vulkan. I've run up against a wall that I can't find documentation on how to climb. Right now I am drawing a 2D triangle and moving it around the screen, my 2D triangle is defined as 1 vertex in a vertex buffer that will, in the future, be translated into screen space in my vertex shader. This single vertex is turned into 3 vertices by my geometry shader and is then passed to my fragment shader.

    triangle_center_position[0] = (cursor_x - (vulkan_window_width_get() / 2.0f)) / vulkan_window_width_get();
    triangle_center_position[1] = (cursor_y - (vulkan_window_height_get() / 2.0f)) / vulkan_window_height_get();
    // send to gpu via memory mapped region
    memcpy(triangle_position_buffer.mapped_memory, &triangle_center_position, sizeof(vec2) * 1);

It is bound in the Command Buffer in the following manner:

    VkBuffer vertexBuffers[] = {buffer->buffer};
    VkDeviceSize offsets[] = {0};
    vkCmdBindVertexBuffers(command_buffer[i], 0, 1, vertexBuffers, offsets);
    vkCmdDraw(command_buffer[i], (uint32_t) buffer->num_elements, 1, 0, 0);

My plan is to eventually modify this code to take in a 3D point and have my geometry shader expand my 3D point into a voxel.

Unfortunately I only want this transformation to happen to blocks within the voxel world not to other things (player models, etc).

In OpenGL I'd just call glUseProgram() on two shader programs built for different "material"s which seems to be extremely discouraged in vulkan. My instinct is something like this

currentMaterial = null
for (Renderable r : sort(everything, by material type)) 
    if (!r.isWithinViewOfScreen()) 
        continue
    if (r.material != currentMaterial)
        currentMaterial = r.material
        r.material.use()
    r.render()

The main issue is that some Renderables will use completely different shader requirements but there does not seem to be a provision within vulkan to swap between shader programs.

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    "In OpenGL I'd just call glUseProgram() on two shader programs built for different "material"s which seems to be extremely discouraged in vulkan." The reason it is "discouraged" in Vulkan is because it's slow in hardware. Whether Vulkan or OpenGL. It's just that OpenGL makes it appear fast because of its API making the program binding operation simple. So you shouldn't be doing it in either API. Commented Sep 22, 2018 at 16:46
  • 2
    "The main issue is that some Renderables will use completely different shader requirements but there does not seem to be a provision within vulkan to swap between shader programs." I don't understand your question. Shaders are part of program pipelines. So if you want to change shaders, you change pipelines. So what are you confused about? Commented Sep 22, 2018 at 16:49
  • @NicolBolas is there a way around what I am attempting to do? The requirement seems very simple. I want to transform the geometry of a single type of vertex. Is this possible another way? Or how would I go about swapping preconfigured pipelines while keeping all of the frame data in tact? Commented Sep 22, 2018 at 17:23
  • A way around what? I don't understand your problem. You say you want to render a series of objects with one shader, then use another shader for another series of objects. I don't understand what problem you're having with doing that is. Commented Sep 22, 2018 at 17:44
  • @NicolBolas I don't know if you read my issue but I am attempting to render one object which I want to modify using a geometry shader and another object which I want to render without said geometry shader. Basically I want to create a voxel world (cubes) and I want to use a single point, modified by the geometry shader, to create the landscape. I then want to render other things on top. Things like items or player models. Things that are non-voxel in nature. Commented Sep 22, 2018 at 18:35

1 Answer 1

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there does not seem to be a provision within vulkan to swap between shader programs.

The closest analog to glUseProgram in vulkan is vkCmdBindPipeline.

The main difference is that much of what is considered to be part of the OpenGL state machine is baked into the Vulkan pipeline object. So for instance, while on OpenGL you might call glUseProgram, render some content, then call glDisable(GL_DEPTH_TEST) and render some more, on Vulkan these are going to be two different pipelines and will require a call to vkCmdBindPipeline for each.

If you're familiar with vkCmdBindPipeline and you're looking for some way to modify which shaders, the short answer is that you can't do that. You need to create a full VkPipeline object for each set of shaders you need to use, even if none of the other values in the pipeline are different.

However, if you're concerned that you're going to end up creating some enormous number of pipelines and that this will impact your performance, you should look into the use of pipeline caches and the VK_PIPELINE_CREATE_DERIVATIVE_BIT flag which allows you to create something like child pipelines from a template pipeline. This should result in the same or better performance as you were getting from OpenGL.

EDIT:

Bear in mind that developers trying to improve pipeline creation performance should use both the VkPipelineCache functionality as well as VK_PIPELINE_CREATE_DERIVATIVE_BIT. How much derivative pipelines help you depends entirely on the driver, and some drivers (like the ARM MALI driver) are explicitly documented as ignoring this flag. The Vulkan spec doesn't give any guidance whatsoever on when to use or not use the derivative flag. The proper approach is probably either to directly work with ISVs to figure out how to best apply it, OR to always use it in the hopes that it will improve performance where it can and not impact performance otherwise, OR to just not use derivatives at all.

The pipeline cache functionality, on the other hand, will almost certainly improve pipeline creation time on a broad range of hardware.

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  • Thanks so much! VK_PIPELINE_CREATE_DERIVATIVE_BIT is exactly what I was looking for! I don't know how I missed that in the docs. Commented Sep 23, 2018 at 14:24
  • @JoshuaKatz Updated my answer with a little bit more information about the pros and cons of derivative pipelines.
    – Jherico
    Commented Sep 23, 2018 at 21:03

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