I have an array of objects that looks like this:

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200},{costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}]

and I want to sum each element in the array to produce an array like this:

var result = [{costOfAirtickets: 4000, costOfHotel: 3200}]

I have used a map and reduce function but I was able to only sum an individual element like so:

data.map(item => ite.costOfAirtickets).reduce((prev, next)=>prev + next); // 22

At the moment this produces a single value which is not what I want as per initial explanation.

Is there a way to do this in Javascript or probably with lodash.

  • 4
    Why do you want it to return an array? – Luca Kiebel Sep 24 at 12:17
  • 1
    Because I want to loop the array in the angular view. – Dave Kalu Sep 24 at 12:24
  • 4
    But you don't need any loop to handle a single Object. – Luca Kiebel Sep 24 at 12:24
  • 1
    An array of objects you mean. – Dave Kalu Sep 24 at 12:53
  • 2
    costOfHotel should be 2200 I guess – Koushik Chatterjee Sep 24 at 13:34

14 Answers 14

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Using for..in to iterate object and reduce to iterate array

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200},{costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}];

var result = [data.reduce((acc, n) => {
  for (var prop in n) {
    if (acc.hasOwnProperty(prop)) acc[prop] += n[prop];
    else acc[prop] = n[prop];
  }
  return acc;
}, {})]
console.log(result)

  • 2
    This solution is nice, because it allows one to automatically include different properties per trip ({..., costOfRentalCar: 300}) . But it only works if the only properties in a trip are costs. – Scott Sauyet Sep 24 at 12:29
  • 2
    Instead of acc[prop], use acc.hasOwnProperty(prop). This prevents that, in some situations, you are checking if there's a __toString or something. Also, use acc[prop] += +n[prop] || 0; for summing. If I pass a string to it, it will just concatenate. The +n[prop] forces it to be converted to integer. The || 0 removes other falsy values like NaN. Same thing for acc[prop] = n[prop] to be acc[prop] = +n[prop] || 0. – Ismael Miguel Sep 24 at 15:01
  • 1
    thanks for letting me know my mistakes :D – Chris Li Sep 24 at 15:50
  • 1
    This answer is several years out of date. People don't use for...in + hasOwnProperty anymore, use for(const key of Object.keys(...)) instead. Also this whole thing can be done as a simple one-liner using lodash. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Sep 24 at 19:06
  • 1
    @IsmaelMiguel Even simpler, if (prop in acc) … – Bergi Sep 24 at 19:41

Use Lodash to simplify your life.

const _ = require('lodash')
let keys = ['costOfAirtickets', 'costOfHotel']; 
let results = _.zipObject(keys, keys.map(key => _.sum( _.map(data, key))))
...
{ costOfAirtickets: 4000, costOfHotel: 2200 }

Explanation:

  • _.sum(_.map(data, key)): generates sum of each array
  • _.zipObject: zips the results with the array sum
  • using keys.map() for sum of each key as _.map does not guarantee order.

Documentation:

  • 3
    Would love to know the reason for the downvote. – Roopak A Nelliat Sep 24 at 13:43
  • Your solution doesn't solve the problem asked by the OP which was how to sum an array of objects like such: var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200},{costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}] – Dave Kalu Sep 24 at 13:50
  • However, your solution is great. thanks. – Dave Kalu Sep 24 at 13:51
  • 1
    @DaveKalu: why? result contains exactly the asked value. Aren't you the OP? IMO this is the best answer. @Roopak: you can still simplify it a little bit: _.sumBy(data, key) or _(data).sumBy(key). – tokland Sep 24 at 19:09
  • @DaveKalu: This does solve the exact problem asked. It's also the cleanest answer on this page, and exactly what I was about to write. Note that keys can be defined as const keys = Object.keys(data); – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Sep 24 at 19:37

To create a resultant / reduced value, you should use .reduce() method instead of .map():

let data = [
  {costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200},
  {costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}
];

let result = data.reduce(
  (a, c) => (Object.keys(c).forEach(k => (a[k] = (a[k] || 0) + c[k])), a), {}
);

console.log(result);

  • Simplified: const result = data.reduce((a, c) => (Object.keys(c).forEach(k => (a[k] += c[k])), a)) – JollyJoker Sep 24 at 14:24

Here is a lodash approach

_(data).flatMap(_.entries).groupBy(0).mapValues(v=>_.sumBy(v, 1)).value()

It will sum by all the unique keys.

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200},{costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}];

var res = _(data).flatMap(_.entries).groupBy(0).mapValues(v=>_.sumBy(v, 0)).value();

console.log(res);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.17.11/lodash.min.js"></script>

Wrap your result to a [...] or use a .castArray() at the end before unwrapping using .value() in case you want a array as result.

You don't need to map the array, you're really just reducing things inside it.

const totalCostOfAirTickets: data.reduce((prev, next) => prev + next.costOfAirTickets, 0)
const totalCostOfHotel: data.reduce((prev, next) => prev + next.costOfHotel, 0)
const totals = [{totalCostOfAirTickets, totalCostOfHotel}]

In one go, you could do something like

const totals = data.reduce((prev, next) => { 
    prev.costOfAirTickets += next.costOfAirTickets; 
    prev.costOfHotel += next.costOfHotel; 
}, {costOfAirTickets: 0, costOfHotel: 0})

Another solution would be to use Map (not Array.prototype.map) as it has several notable differences compared to objects:

var data = [{
  costOfAirtickets: 2500,
  costOfHotel: 1200
}, {
  costOfAirtickets: 1500,
  costOfHotel: 1000
}]

let sums = data.reduce((collection,rcd)=>{
  Object.entries(rcd).forEach(([key,value])=>{
      let sum = collection.get(key) || 0
      collection.set(key, sum + +value)
  })
  return collection
}, new Map())

console.log(...sums.entries())

Explanation

Outer loop

The above first iterates over your data array using the reduce method. Each object within that I'll be referring to as a record -- distinguished in the code via the variable, rcd.

Each iteration of reduce returns a value which is passed as the first argument to the next iteration of the loop. In this case, the parameter collection holds that argument, which is your set of sums.

Inner loop

Within the reduce loop, each key/value pair of the record is iterated over using forEach. To get the key/value pair the Object.entries method is used. Using array destructuring these arguments can be directly assigned to the respective variables, key and value

Retrieving/Setting values

Unlike a primitive object, Map has its own methods for getting and setting its entries using get() and set(). So first retrieve the previous sum using get(), if it's not set then default to 0, which is what the || 0 does. At that point, you can assume the previous sum is at least 0 or greater and add the current key's value onto it.

Alternatives to Map

If you find Map is a bit heavy-handed, you may also use a similar object such as Set, which has many of the same methods (except the get()), or you could also use a primitive object (i.e. {}).

You can use a simple forEach() loop for that:

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200},{costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}];
var res = [];
var tempObj = {};
data.forEach(({costOfAirtickets, costOfHotel}) => {
  tempObj['costOfAirtickets'] = (tempObj['costOfAirtickets'] || 0) + costOfAirtickets;
  tempObj['costOfHotel'] = (tempObj['costOfHotel'] || 0) + costOfHotel;
 });
res.push(tempObj);
console.log(res);

  • 2
    why brackets for simple properties which works with dot? – Nina Scholz Sep 24 at 12:20

Try using reduce only as in the below snippet. Try avoiding multiple iterations. Hope the below snippet helps!

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200},{costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}]

var total = data.reduce(function (result,value,key) {
result['costOfAirtickets'] = result['costOfAirtickets']  + value['costOfAirtickets'];
result['costOfHotel'] = result['costOfHotel']  + value['costOfHotel'];

return result},{costOfAirtickets:0,costOfHotel:0});

console.log(total)

You could reduce the array by taking an object for summing.

var data = [{ costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200 }, { costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000 }],
    keys = ['costOfAirtickets', 'costOfHotel'],
    sum = data.reduce((r, o) => {
        keys.forEach(k => r[k] += o[k]);
        return r;
    }, Object.assign(...keys.map(k => ({ [k]: 0 }))));

console.log(sum);

map the object and calculate the sum and store it in another.

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200},{costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}];
var result = [];
var sum = 0;
var costsum = 0;
data.map(function(item, key){
  var cost = item;
  //nsole.log(cost);
  sum = sum + cost.costOfAirtickets;
  costsum = costsum + cost.costOfHotel;

});

result = [{costOfAirtickets:sum, costOfHotel:costsum}];

console.log(result);

This is the easiest approach I could think off

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200},{costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}];
var sum ={};
for(var obj in data){
  for(var ele in data[obj]){
    if(!data[obj].hasOwnProperty(ele)) continue;
      if(sum[ele] === undefined){
        sum[ele] = data[obj][ele];
      }else{
        sum[ele] = sum[ele] + data[obj][ele];
      }
  }

}
var arr = [sum];
console.log(arr);

My simplistic answer would be like;

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200},
            {costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}],
    res  = data.reduce((p,c) => Object.entries(c).reduce((r,[k,v]) => (r[k]+=v, r), p));
console.log(res);

A note on usage of .reduce(): If the array items and the accumulated value is of same type you may consider not using an initial value as an accumulator and do your reducing with previous (p) and current (c) elements. The outer reduce in the above snippet is of this type. However the inner reduce takes an array of key (k) value (v) pair as [k,v] to return an object, hence an initial value (p) is essential.

The result is the accumulated value as an object. If you need it in an array then just put it in an array like [res].

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200},{costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}];

var result = [data.reduce((acc, n) => {
  for (var prop in n) {
    if (acc[prop]) acc[prop] += n[prop];
    else acc[prop] = n[prop];
  }
  return acc;
}, {})]
console.log(result)

  • how is this different from the accepted answer? – Roopak A Nelliat Sep 24 at 13:56
  • This is isn't different from the accepted answer. – Dave Kalu Sep 26 at 16:47

Lodash

Using lodash reduce and _.mergeWith this is a one liner:

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200}, {costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}]

var result = _.reduce(data, (r,c) => _.mergeWith(r, c, (o = 0, s) => o + s), {})

console.log(result)
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.17.10/lodash.min.js"></script>

ES6 Only

If you do NOT want to mutate the original array you can utilize ES6 reduce, Object.entries, and forEach like this:

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200}, {costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}]

// One liner
var result1 = data.reduce((r, c) =>
  !Object.entries(c).forEach(([key, value]) => r[key] = (r[key] || 0) + value) && r, {})

// More readable
var result2 = data.reduce((r, c) => {
  Object.entries(c).forEach(([key, value]) => r[key] = (r[key] || 0) + value)
  return r
}, {})

console.log(result1)
console.log(result2)

If we do not care about mutating the initial data array then we can have a one liner solution:

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200}, {costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}]

data.reduce((r, c) => !Object.entries(c).forEach(([key,value]) => r[key] += value) && r)

console.log(data[0])

More readable:

var data = [{costOfAirtickets: 2500, costOfHotel: 1200}, {costOfAirtickets: 1500, costOfHotel: 1000}]

data.reduce((r, c) => {
  Object.entries(c).forEach(([key, value]) => r[key] += value)
  return r
})

console.log(data[0])

The only difference between the mutating and not mutating examples is the initial value for the reduce (and also the fact that with the mutating we use the 0 index to as an accumulator for the sums). In the mutating ones there is no initial value where in the others we start with empty object literal.

if you need the result to be an array specifically then return [data] for the mutating examples and [result] for the pure examples.

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