3

in docker-compose.yml,

What is the difference between in following ports notations?

ports:
   - "5000:5000"

resp:

ports:
   - "8080"

or no ports at all.

For example in following docker-compose.yml, the mongodb service must be exposing a port to communicate with node service, but no port is specified

services:

  node:
    build:
      context: .
      dockerfile: node.dockerfile
    ports:
      - "3000:3000"
    networks:
      - nodeapp-network
    depends_on: 
      - mongodb

  mongodb:
    image: mongo
    networks:
      - nodeapp-network

networks:
  nodeapp-network:
    driver: bridge

source: https://github.com/DanWahlin/NodeExpressMongoDBDockerApp

However in these docker-compose.yml, there are ports awlays specified with either 27017:27017 or 8080 notation.

services:
    nginx:
      container_name: nginx
      image: ${DOCKER_ACCT}/nginx
      build: 
        context: .
        dockerfile: .docker/nginx.${APP_ENV}.dockerfile
      links:
        - node1:node1
        - node2:node2
        - node3:node3
      ports:
        - "80:80"
        - "443:443"
      networks:
        - codewithdan-network

    node1:
      container_name: node-codewithdan-1
      image: ${DOCKER_ACCT}/node-codewithdan
      build: 
        context: .
        dockerfile: .docker/node-codewithdan.${APP_ENV}.dockerfile
      ports:
      - "8080"
      volumes:
        - .:/var/www/codewithdan
      working_dir: /var/www/codewithdan
      env_file:
        - ./.docker/env/app.${APP_ENV}.env
      depends_on:
        - mongo
        - redis
      networks:
        - codewithdan-network

    node2:
      container_name: node-codewithdan-2
      image: ${DOCKER_ACCT}/node-codewithdan
      build: 
        context: .
        dockerfile: .docker/node-codewithdan.${APP_ENV}.dockerfile
      ports:
      - "8080"
      volumes:
        - .:/var/www/codewithdan
      working_dir: /var/www/codewithdan
      env_file:
        - ./.docker/env/app.${APP_ENV}.env
      depends_on:
        - mongo
        - redis
      networks:
        - codewithdan-network

    node3:
      container_name: node-codewithdan-3
      image: ${DOCKER_ACCT}/node-codewithdan
      build: 
        context: .
        dockerfile: .docker/node-codewithdan.${APP_ENV}.dockerfile
      ports:
      - "8080"
      volumes:
        - .:/var/www/codewithdan
      working_dir: /var/www/codewithdan
      env_file:
        - ./.docker/env/app.${APP_ENV}.env
      depends_on:
        - mongo
        - redis
      networks:
        - codewithdan-network

    mongo:
      container_name: mongo
      image: ${DOCKER_ACCT}/mongo
      build:
        context: .
        dockerfile: .docker/mongo.dockerfile
      ports:
      - "27017:27017"
      env_file:
        - ./.docker/env/mongo.${APP_ENV}.env
      networks:
        - codewithdan-network

    redis:
      container_name: redis
      image: ${DOCKER_ACCT}/redis
      build: 
        context: .
        dockerfile: .docker/redis.${APP_ENV}.dockerfile
      ports:
        - "6379"
      networks:
        - codewithdan-network

networks:
    codewithdan-network:
      driver: bridge

source: https://github.com/DanWahlin/CodeWithDanDockerServices

Can you explain the difference?

2 Answers 2

2

Typical Docker containers run a long-running server listening on some TCP port. Other containers on the same Docker network can reach that container using the container’s name (docker run --name, container_name: directive) as a DNS name and the port the server is running on. In Docker Compose, Compose creates a Docker network per Compose YAML file, and also makes services available under their key in the YAML file. This works even if no ports: are specified.

So, for instance, if your docker-compose.yml file says

services:
  mongo:
    image: mongo
  others:
    env:
      MONGODB_HOST: mongo
      MONGODB_PORT: 27017

then the MongoDB container will be reachable on that host name and (default) port, even though it doesn’t explicitly have a ports:.

If you do declare a ports: then the container will be reachable from outside Docker space. If you only have one port it’s the port number of the server, and Docker picks the host port; this isn’t useful in most cases (but it’s guaranteed to not hit a port conflict). If you have two ports they’re the host port and internal service port. You can also specify a host IP address to bind(2) to.

Presence or absence of ports: doesn’t affect inter-dontainer communication. Always use the container’s name (or Docker-compose.yml service name) and the “internal” port number the server is listening on.

2
  • Regarding "Compose creates a Docker network per Compose YAML file": Ok, but then what effect have the network declarations in my samples?
    – Liero
    Sep 25, 2018 at 6:46
  • 1
    It creates a second network and uses that instead. I think it was required once upon a time (like links: before it) and has gotten enshrined in tutorials.
    – David Maze
    Sep 25, 2018 at 9:17
2

Either specify both ports (HOST:CONTAINER), or just the container port (an ephemeral host port is chosen). So in your case 8080 is container port

ports:
 - "3000"
 - "3000-3005"
 - "8000:8000"
 - "9090-9091:8080-8081"
 - "49100:22"
 - "127.0.0.1:8001:8001"
 - "127.0.0.1:5000-5010:5000-5010"
 - "6060:6060/udp"

From here

The ephemeral port range is configured by /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_local_port_range kernel parameter, typically ranging from 32768 to 61000.

Either way, you should be able to peek at what Docker has accomplished in your network stack by examining your NAT tables. from here

In docker compose by default no ports will be created in case they collide with already opened ports

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