64

Is there a shorter way to write the following? (Something that would check for null without explicitly writing != null)

from item in list 
where item.MyProperty != null 
select item.MyProperty
4
  • 11
    Is there a reason you don't want the code to be explicit about what it does? Mar 9, 2011 at 15:50
  • I am not aware of any shorter way. But even your version is what is generally considered "long". Mar 9, 2011 at 15:51
  • That is pretty simple. But, if an individual item in the list is null you will get a NRE. Your where clause needs to be item != null && item.MyProperty != null.
    – CheeZe5
    Mar 9, 2011 at 15:54
  • 1
    @R. Martinho Fernandes For nullable value type and newly added nullable reference type, null-checked-then-select still gives you a nullable type.
    – Jason Lee
    Jun 8, 2021 at 23:18

9 Answers 9

88

You can use the OfType operator. It ignores null values in the source sequence. Just use the same type as MyProperty and it won't filter out anything else.

// given:
// public T MyProperty { get; }
var nonNullItems = list.Select(x => x.MyProperty).OfType<T>();

I would advise against this though. If you want to pick non-null values, what can be more explicit than saying you want "the MyProperties from the list that are not null"?

5
  • 2
    I will listen to everybody's advice and leave it as it is. But I marked your answer as accepted because you told me something I didn't know. Mar 9, 2011 at 16:02
  • 1
    I like this one - it keeps the code as clean as possible, so long as you can remember how OfType<T> functions! Otherwise, I would go with @CodeInChaos's second extension method. Jun 27, 2011 at 3:02
  • 69
    Abusing OfType as a null check is unintuitive and bad style. Feb 13, 2012 at 12:17
  • 1
    @CodesInChaos Not really. For nullable value type and newly added nullable reference type, null-checked-then-select still gives you a nullable type.
    – Jason Lee
    Jun 8, 2021 at 23:18
  • readability: 0, added more confusion.
    – Sh7ne
    May 15, 2023 at 6:00
58

You could define your own extension method, but I wouldn't recommend that.

public static IEnumerable<TResult> SelectNonNull<T, TResult>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence,Func<T, TResult> projection)
{
   return sequence.Select(projection).Where(e => e != null);
}

I don't like this one because it mixes two concerns. Projecting with Select and filtering your null values are separate operations and should not be combined into one method.


I'd rather define an extension method that only checks if the item isn't null:

public static IEnumerable<T> WhereNotNull<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence)
{
   return sequence.Where(e => e != null);
}

public static IEnumerable<T> WhereNotNull<T>(this IEnumerable<T?> sequence)
    where T : struct
{
   return sequence.Where(e => e != null).Select(e => e.Value);
}

This has only a single purpose, checking for null. For nullable value types it converts to the non nullable equivalent, since it's useless to preserve the nullable wrapper for values which cannot be null.

With this method, your code becomes:

list.Select(item => item.MyProperty).WhereNotNull()
2
  • Except it does not work if the expression tree is needed (eg in entity framework)
    – Rico Suter
    Aug 21, 2013 at 16:29
  • 3
    @RicoSuter If you need to support that, add an overload of IQueryable<T>. Jan 15, 2015 at 10:24
16

I tend to create a static class containing basic functions for cases like these. They allow me write expressions like

var myValues myItems.Select(x => x.Value).Where(Predicates.IsNotNull);

And the collection of predicate functions:

public static class Predicates
{
    public static bool IsNull<T>(T value) where T : class
    {
        return value == null;
    }

    public static bool IsNotNull<T>(T value) where T : class
    {
        return value != null;
    }

    public static bool IsNull<T>(T? nullableValue) where T : struct
    {
        return !nullableValue.HasValue;
    }

    public static bool IsNotNull<T>(T? nullableValue) where T : struct
    {
        return nullableValue.HasValue;
    }

    public static bool HasValue<T>(T? nullableValue) where T : struct
    {
        return nullableValue.HasValue;
    }

    public static bool HasNoValue<T>(T? nullableValue) where T : struct
    {
        return !nullableValue.HasValue;
    }
}
5
  • 9
    In using this method, I've renamed the class to Is and removed the Is prefix from all methods. It makes things more readable IMO: collection.Where(Is.NotNull).Select...
    – zzzzBov
    Nov 13, 2014 at 19:11
  • Just glad I was able to help someone out!
    – Anthony
    Nov 13, 2014 at 19:12
  • Better not use operators == and != for generic types. Because they maybe ovveriden in type. Use ReferenceEquals(value, null)
    – Horev Ivan
    May 18, 2015 at 14:58
  • @HorevIvan That assumes you don't want to respect the operator == logic in the generic type. I would argue it is up to the author of the generic type to ensure what it means for == equality.
    – Anthony
    May 18, 2015 at 15:27
  • @HorevIvan You cannot override ==, you can only overload it. But the overloading does not affect generic type parameters. May 28, 2015 at 13:29
4

There is no way to skip a check if it exists.

4

// if you need to check if all items' MyProperty doesn't have null

if (list.All(x => x.MyProperty != null))
// do something

// or if you need to check if at least one items' property has doesn't have null

if (list.Any(x => x.MyProperty != null))
// do something

But you always have to check for null

1
  • This for me is the correct answer. Maybe my requirements were different than the person asking the question, but this worked perfectly for me.
    – Karlomanio
    Dec 13, 2023 at 17:52
3

get one column in the distinct select and ignore null values:

 var items = db.table.Where(p => p.id!=null).GroupBy(p => p.id)
                                .Select(grp => grp.First().id)
                                .ToList();
1

This is adapted from CodesInChaos's extension method. The name is shorter (NotNull) and more importantly, restricts the type (T) to reference types with where T : class.

    public static IEnumerable<T> NotNull<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source) where T : class
    {
        return source.Where(item => item != null);
    }
3
  • 2
    If you down vote, please comment why. Down voting without cause only discourages contributions. If something is incorrect or incomplete, say so. If you prefer another answer, simply up vote that other answer. Mar 2, 2014 at 21:58
  • 1
    1) I didn't downvote, but the restriction to reference types isn't a good idea IMO. It prevents using this method on nullable value types, which is particularly annoying when you want to use this method in another generic method where T hasn't been restricted. 2) I'm not too fond of the name change either. With that name I'd expect it to check if source != null, not if the elements are not null. Mar 20, 2014 at 14:46
  • @CodesInChaos, thank you for the well-reasoned comments. They are appreciated. Unfortunately, C# (at this time) doesn't have a constraint for nullable. Mar 20, 2014 at 18:56
1

I know i am a bit late to the party but I found a IMO very elegant sollution to this problem. I wrote an extension method to chain onto my LINQ queries:

public static IEnumerable<T> DiscardNullValues<T>(this IEnumerable<T?> nullable)
    {
        foreach (var item in nullable)
        {
            if (item is not null) yield return item;
        }
    }

Works like a charm.

0

This is a feature that have been proposed to the dotnet/runtime issue tracker.

See this comment that proposes a SelectNotNull function : https://github.com/dotnet/runtime/issues/30381#issuecomment-806396119

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