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What I'm Trying to Acheive

I have a byte[] containing the data of a pdf document. I want to show this to my user by writing the file temporarily to disk and using Process.Start to fire up a pdf viewer. Once the user has viewed the file and closed it, I want to delete it, so as to not clutter the user's temp folder.

What I've Got Right Now

At the moment my code looks like this

public WritePdfDataToFile(byte[] pdfData, string tmpFileName)
{
    using (var pdfFileStream = File.OpenWrite(tmpFileName))
    {
        pdfFileStream.Write(pdfData,0,pdfData.Length);
    } 

    var process = Process.Start(tmpFileName);
    process.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
    process.Exited += (o,e) => File.Delete(tmpFileName);
}

Now this works great at first and my installed PDF viewer pops up and I see my pdf and when I close it, the file disappears as desired.

However, if I already have my Pdf viewer of choice open, 2 different things can happen.

  1. Process.Start returns null because an already running process handles the file (this is documented here )

    • The issue here is obvious, process is null so I can't use the object to attach my event handler too
  2. Process.Start returns a process that almost immediately exits - This is what happens locally on my machine and I can only assume that Acrobat reader has some child process handling opening another file and putting it in a tab in the already existing window. It then closes this child process and leaves the temp file open in Acrobat reader.

    • Here what happens is that the Exited event I attached fires prematurely and tries to delete the file while it is open, throwing an exception.

To me I feel like I've exhausted my options using Process. I don't see a way around handling this. I don't want to block and wait for the process to exit and if the process is null because it already existed, I don't want to go search for the process by name as I don't know what process the user machine will start to handle a pdf file.

My other option was to explicitly create the FileStream and use the constructor that allows me to specify the the file should be deleted when the stream closes

using (var pdfStream = new FileStream(tempFileName,FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.ReadWrite|FileShare.Delete,1024, FileOptions.DeleteOnClose))
{
    pdfFileStream.Write(pdfData,0,pdfData.Length);
    Process.Start(tempFileName);
}

2 large problems here

  1. The the using statement exits (and so dispose is called on the FileStream and the file deleted) before the process is started and so it says it can't find the file. I could insert a Thread.Sleep after starting the process but before exiting the using statement scope, but one that will lock up the thread and two who knows how sluggish the end user's machine might be, So I'm really not a fan of that.

  2. (At least on my machine, with Acrobat Reader) the file won't open while my application still had a handle to the stream

What I want Help With Exactly (please)

Any suggestions on how I can do this nicely? I feel like I can't be the only one who has tried this yet, I can't find a safe, non-hacky suggestion anywhere.

  • Consider using TempFileCollection instead. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… – mjwills Sep 25 '18 at 12:48
  • @mjwills Thanks, I have looked at that class before and while it solves some minor issues, it still doesn't help with deleting the file once the user has finished looking at it. – Dave Sep 25 '18 at 13:07
  • 1
    The fact is you don't know when they are finished looking at it. All you can do is, periodically, try and delete it. Put all of the files in a specific folder. Every minute or so, try and delete everything that it is there (and swallow exceptions - since it may fail if they are viewing it). – mjwills Sep 25 '18 at 13:07
  • I did fear that that might be the case. Thanks – Dave Sep 25 '18 at 13:22
  • Maybe try this ?. It works for me... – Lucy82 May 28 at 6:53

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