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This question already has an answer here:

Why does the first always evaluate to true? I would expect these two statements to behave identically.

   for (int i =0;i<4;++i) (0 < i < 3) ? cout << "True " : cout << "False ";

True True True True

    for (int i =0;i<4;++i) (0 < i && i < 3) ? cout << "True " : cout << "False ";

False True True False

marked as duplicate by NathanOliver c++ Sep 25 '18 at 15:56

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  • 2
    (0 < i < 3) -- You will soon discover that C++ is not algebra. – PaulMcKenzie Sep 25 '18 at 12:53
  • dont confuse maths notation with c++ syntax, there are similarities (eg an expression like 0 < i is either true or false) but the differences outweigh them. Maybe the most prominent example is x = 3*y; which is not an equation, but an assignment. – formerlyknownas_463035818 Sep 25 '18 at 13:00
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The condition 0 < i < 3 is really (0 < i) < 3.

And it doesn't matter if 0 < i is true or not, as the result (0 for false and 1 for true) will always be less than 3.

If you want to make sure i is within a range, you need multiple separate comparisons: 0 < i && i < 3, as you do in the second loop.

2

Because no combined comparison operator exists in C++. The expression is evaluated as

(0 < i) < 3

but x < 1 evaluates to true/false which evaluates to 1/0 when compared with an int so in the end 0 < 3 is always true and 1 < 3 too.

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