7

I was reading up on filter expressions using catch(..) when (..) in C# and I couldn't find any mention of what happens if an exception is thrown while evaluating the expression. I tried going through the docs and spec but either I couldn't find them or they are not mentioned. So, I made up a tiny program to check what happens when I throw from when(..). I put it up on https://dotnetfiddle.net/R7oJNp

try {
    Console.WriteLine("Test(): Inside Test()");
    throw new Exception("thrown from Test()");
} catch (Exception) when (AlwaysThrow()) {
    Console.WriteLine("Test(): caught exception in Test()");
} catch (Exception e) {
    Console.WriteLine("Test(): totally skipped last catch clause, any inner exception: " + (e.InnerException?.Message ?? "nothing"));
    throw;
}

What I'm noticing is that the entire catch(..) when (..) block is skipped if an exception is thrown inside when(..). It skips to the next matching catch block and upon inspecting the exception object caught, there's no trace of the exception that originated from when(..).

I wanted to know if this is the expected behavior and if there's a reference to the docs/spec regarding what's supposed to happen in this scenario. It seems odd to skip the entire block and throw away the exception because that'd make it very hard to debug.

**Edit: ** Okay, this is the behavior according to .NET docs but is there any way to trace these? I'm onboard with the idea that exceptions must not happen and filters should be simple enough but we make mistakes. Also, isn't this behavior supposed to be mentioned in C# spec?

1

3 Answers 3

5

VB.Net has supported this long before C# so you may be searching too narrowly:

If an exception occurs during execution of the user-filtered expression, that exception is discarded and the filter expression is considered to have evaluated to false.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/exceptions/using-user-filtered-exception-handlers

5
  • 1
    Technically, this is no guarantee that C# behaves similarly, but I agree that it is very likely.
    – Heinzi
    Sep 26, 2018 at 11:01
  • 2
    If you ask me, when you're handling exceptions, you should avoid causing other exceptions. In catch blocks and when expressions. Sep 26, 2018 at 11:05
  • Is there any links to C# spec where it says this or is this attributed to all of .NET? I'm relatively new to C# and I'm not familiar with other .NET languages.
    – sangeeth96
    Sep 26, 2018 at 11:08
  • @FurkanKambay you are right but we make mistakes. Plus, I see this pattern being abused here and there for things like logging. So, this can happen.
    – sangeeth96
    Sep 26, 2018 at 11:09
  • @SangeethSudheer the c# spec lags behind the released versions. If we assume VB is implemented the same way (since it is a core CLR feature) it might be in the vb spec
    – Crowcoder
    Sep 26, 2018 at 11:11
0

Although a C# 6 feature, exception filters have been supported by the CLR since .NET Framework 1.1.

Exceptions in the expression are handled as follows:

If an exception occurs during execution of the user-filtered expression, that exception overwrites the current exception. In this case, the common language runtime abandons the search for a handler for the current exception, the finally block of the try construct executes, and a search begins outside the current try construct for a handler of the new exception.

2
  • But this is not what's happening in the example I posted, right? The filter's exception is the one that's swallowed and the next catch block is checked for a match.
    – sangeeth96
    Sep 26, 2018 at 11:19
  • This behavior you mentioned changed I believe because the newer .NET doc states what @Crowcoder answered.
    – sangeeth96
    Sep 26, 2018 at 11:25
0

The exception gets swallowed and the filter doesn't match (as if it returned false):

void Main()
{
    UseFilterThenCatch();
    UseFilterOnly();
}

public static bool BadFilter() => throw new Exception("This will be thrown by the filter");

public static void UseFilterThenCatch()
{
    try
    {
        throw new Exception("The exception to catch.");
    }
    catch(Exception) when (BadFilter())
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Filtered");
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Unfiltered"); // This line gets hit.
        Console.WriteLine(e.Message); // This proves it's the first exception thrown.
    }
}

public static void UseFilterOnly()
{
    try
    {
        try
        {
            throw new Exception("The exception to catch.");
        }
        catch (Exception) when (BadFilter())
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Filtered");
        }
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Outer catch");
        Console.WriteLine(e.Message); // This proves it's the first exception thrown.
    }
}

While this is language-specific, and a .NET language could conceivably do something else, it's part and parcel to how filters work in the CLR so it's what the most natural corresponding CIL would do. The same thing also happens with VB.NET and with Linq expressions (which took a bit of deliberate work in the case of interpreted expressions, but happened easily enough with compiled expressions, since again it's just what the most natural corresponding CIL does).

5
  • How is it "natural" to just throw it away? I understand we have a responsibility to not do complicated things in there but firstly, this behavior is not mentioned in the C# docs and secondly, people eventually make mistakes. So, wouldn't it be hard to spot this if it happened?
    – sangeeth96
    Sep 26, 2018 at 11:29
  • I mean it's natural to just produce the CIL code for a filter, rather than writing complicated code that does something other than the underlying CLR does.
    – Jon Hanna
    Sep 26, 2018 at 11:34
  • I'm sorry if I didn't get what you're trying to convey here but what you're saying is that since filters existed before coming to C#, this was what it was gonna do eventually when it hit C#?
    – sangeeth96
    Sep 26, 2018 at 11:38
  • 1
    Pretty much. Filters are a .NET thing, and when is a C# way of using them. It's "natural" to follow the .NET rules on it rather than have something complicated to do otherwise.
    – Jon Hanna
    Sep 26, 2018 at 11:45
  • Incidentally, it's possible within a .NET filter to overwrite a exception being examined with another, so something could have been done with this, but instead we're able to do such overwriting in C# itself (assign to the exception variable within the filter) but it only has an effect on that catch block, should the filter return true. The linq expressions interpreter makes use of this both to implement filters itself, and also so that the correct ordering of filter, catch and finally blocks takes place by implementing the logic of knowing whether to catch or not inside a filter.
    – Jon Hanna
    Sep 26, 2018 at 11:48

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.