24

How to create variable number of EC2 instance resources in Cloudformation template, according to a template parameter?

The EC2 API and management tools allow launching multiple instances of the same AMI, but I can't find how to do this using Cloudformation.

21

The AWS::EC2::Instance Resource doesn't support the MinCount/MaxCount parameters of the underlying RunInstances API, so it's not possible to create a variable number of EC2 instances by passing Parameters to a single copy of this Resource.

To create a variable number of EC2 instance resources in CloudFormation template according to a template Parameter, and without deploying an Auto Scaling Group instead, there are two options:

1. Conditions

You can use Conditions to create a variable number of AWS::EC2::Instance Resources depending on the Parameter.

It's a little verbose (because you have to use Fn::Equals), but it works.

Here's a working example that allows the user to specify up to a maximum of 5 instances:

Launch Stack

Description: Create a variable number of EC2 instance resources.
Parameters:
  InstanceCount:
    Description: Number of EC2 instances (must be between 1 and 5).
    Type: Number
    Default: 1
    MinValue: 1
    MaxValue: 5
    ConstraintDescription: Must be a number between 1 and 5.
  ImageId:
    Description: Image ID to launch EC2 instances.
    Type: AWS::EC2::Image::Id
    # amzn-ami-hvm-2016.09.1.20161221-x86_64-gp2
    Default: ami-9be6f38c
  InstanceType:
    Description: Instance type to launch EC2 instances.
    Type: String
    Default: m3.medium
    AllowedValues: [ m3.medium, m3.large, m3.xlarge, m3.2xlarge ]
Conditions:
  Launch1: !Equals [1, 1]
  Launch2: !Not [!Equals [1, !Ref InstanceCount]]
  Launch3: !And
  - !Not [!Equals [1, !Ref InstanceCount]]
  - !Not [!Equals [2, !Ref InstanceCount]]
  Launch4: !Or
  - !Equals [4, !Ref InstanceCount]
  - !Equals [5, !Ref InstanceCount]
  Launch5: !Equals [5, !Ref InstanceCount]
Resources:
  Instance1:
    Condition: Launch1
    Type: AWS::EC2::Instance
    Properties:
      ImageId: !Ref ImageId
      InstanceType: !Ref InstanceType
  Instance2:
    Condition: Launch2
    Type: AWS::EC2::Instance
    Properties:
      ImageId: !Ref ImageId
      InstanceType: !Ref InstanceType
  Instance3:
    Condition: Launch3
    Type: AWS::EC2::Instance
    Properties:
      ImageId: !Ref ImageId
      InstanceType: !Ref InstanceType
  Instance4:
    Condition: Launch4
    Type: AWS::EC2::Instance
    Properties:
      ImageId: !Ref ImageId
      InstanceType: !Ref InstanceType
  Instance5:
    Condition: Launch5
    Type: AWS::EC2::Instance
    Properties:
      ImageId: !Ref ImageId
      InstanceType: !Ref InstanceType

1a. Template preprocessor with Conditions

As a variation on the above, you can use a template preprocessor like Ruby's Erb to generate the above template based on a specified maximum, making your source code more compact and eliminating duplication:

<%max = 10-%>
Description: Create a variable number of EC2 instance resources.
Parameters:
  InstanceCount:
    Description: Number of EC2 instances (must be between 1 and <%=max%>).
    Type: Number
    Default: 1
    MinValue: 1
    MaxValue: <%=max%>
    ConstraintDescription: Must be a number between 1 and <%=max%>.
  ImageId:
    Description: Image ID to launch EC2 instances.
    Type: AWS::EC2::Image::Id
    # amzn-ami-hvm-2016.09.1.20161221-x86_64-gp2
    Default: ami-9be6f38c
  InstanceType:
    Description: Instance type to launch EC2 instances.
    Type: String
    Default: m3.medium
    AllowedValues: [ m3.medium, m3.large, m3.xlarge, m3.2xlarge ]
Conditions:
  Launch1: !Equals [1, 1]
  Launch2: !Not [!Equals [1, !Ref InstanceCount]]
<%(3..max-1).each do |x|
    low = (max-1)/(x-1) <= 1-%>
  Launch<%=x%>: !<%=low ? 'Or' : 'And'%>
<%  (1..max).each do |i|
      if low && i >= x-%>
  - !Equals [<%=i%>, !Ref InstanceCount]
<%    elsif !low && i < x-%>
  - !Not [!Equals [<%=i%>, !Ref InstanceCount]]
<%    end
    end
  end-%>
  Launch<%=max%>: !Equals [<%=max%>, !Ref InstanceCount]
Resources:
<%(1..max).each do |x|-%>
  Instance<%=x%>:
    Condition: Launch<%=x%>
    Type: AWS::EC2::Instance
    Properties:
      ImageId: !Ref ImageId
      InstanceType: !Ref InstanceType
<%end-%>

To process the above source into a CloudFormation-compatible template, run:

ruby -rerb -e "puts ERB.new(ARGF.read, nil, '-').result" < template.yml > template-out.yml

For convenience, here is a gist with the generated output YAML for 10 variable EC2 instances.

2. Custom Resource

An alternate approach is to implement a Custom Resource that calls the RunInstances/TerminateInstances APIs directly:

Launch Stack

Description: Create a variable number of EC2 instance resources.
Parameters:
  InstanceCount:
    Description: Number of EC2 instances (must be between 1 and 10).
    Type: Number
    Default: 1
    MinValue: 1
    MaxValue: 10
    ConstraintDescription: Must be a number between 1 and 10.
  ImageId:
    Description: Image ID to launch EC2 instances.
    Type: AWS::EC2::Image::Id
    # amzn-ami-hvm-2016.09.1.20161221-x86_64-gp2
    Default: ami-9be6f38c
  InstanceType:
    Description: Instance type to launch EC2 instances.
    Type: String
    Default: m3.medium
    AllowedValues: [ m3.medium, m3.large, m3.xlarge, m3.2xlarge ]
Resources:
  EC2Instances:
    Type: Custom::EC2Instances
    Properties:
      ServiceToken: !GetAtt EC2InstancesFunction.Arn
      ImageId: !Ref ImageId
      InstanceType: !Ref InstanceType
      MinCount: !Ref InstanceCount
      MaxCount: !Ref InstanceCount
  EC2InstancesFunction:
    Type: AWS::Lambda::Function
    Properties:
      Handler: index.handler
      Role: !GetAtt LambdaExecutionRole.Arn
      Code:
        ZipFile: !Sub |
          var response = require('cfn-response');
          var AWS = require('aws-sdk');
          exports.handler = function(event, context) {
            var physicalId = event.PhysicalResourceId || 'none';
            function success(data) {
              return response.send(event, context, response.SUCCESS, data, physicalId);
            }
            function failed(e) {
              return response.send(event, context, response.FAILED, e, physicalId);
            }
            var ec2 = new AWS.EC2();
            var instances;
            if (event.RequestType == 'Create') {
              var launchParams = event.ResourceProperties;
              delete launchParams.ServiceToken;
              ec2.runInstances(launchParams).promise().then((data)=> {
                instances = data.Instances.map((data)=> data.InstanceId);
                physicalId = instances.join(':');
                return ec2.waitFor('instanceRunning', {InstanceIds: instances}).promise();
              }).then((data)=> success({Instances: instances})
              ).catch((e)=> failed(e));
            } else if (event.RequestType == 'Delete') {
              if (physicalId == 'none') {return success({});}
              var deleteParams = {InstanceIds: physicalId.split(':')};
              ec2.terminateInstances(deleteParams).promise().then((data)=>
                ec2.waitFor('instanceTerminated', deleteParams).promise()
              ).then((data)=>success({})
              ).catch((e)=>failed(e));
            } else {
              return failed({Error: "In-place updates not supported."});
            }
          };
      Runtime: nodejs4.3
      Timeout: 300
  LambdaExecutionRole:
    Type: AWS::IAM::Role
    Properties:
      AssumeRolePolicyDocument:
        Version: '2012-10-17'
        Statement:
        - Effect: Allow
          Principal: {Service: [lambda.amazonaws.com]}
          Action: ['sts:AssumeRole']
      Path: /
      ManagedPolicyArns:
      - arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/service-role/AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole
      Policies:
      - PolicyName: EC2Policy
        PolicyDocument:
          Version: '2012-10-17'
          Statement:
            - Effect: Allow
              Action:
              - 'ec2:RunInstances'
              - 'ec2:DescribeInstances'
              - 'ec2:DescribeInstanceStatus'
              - 'ec2:TerminateInstances'
              Resource: ['*']
Outputs:
  Instances:
    Value: !Join [',', !GetAtt EC2Instances.Instances]
  • 1
    If auto-scaling groups are not an option (wasn't for one of my use cases), then this custom resource is pretty handy! Thanks for sharing! – André Caron May 15 '17 at 13:54
  • @wjordan Can you please give conditions example for 10 instances? I know you have it upto 5 in "1. Conditions". Appreciated. – user2501165 Dec 21 '17 at 16:17
  • This absolutely awesome and I was looking for the similar implementation. Thanks! – Saravanan G Jan 27 '18 at 1:03
  • 1
    @user2501165 The example template and command-line instructions in '1a' above can generate conditions for an arbitrary max number of instances. For convenience, here is a gist with the generated output YAML for 10 variable EC2 instances. – wjordan Jan 27 '18 at 1:15
  • Just fixed a logic bug in the Option 1 / 1a template-code conditions, the !Or function should be !And for the low-numbered (!Not) conditions. Thanks @gaurav-goel and @krish for pointing this out. – wjordan May 28 at 22:48
13

I think what the original poster was after is something like:

"Parameters" : {
    "InstanceCount" : {
        "Description" : "Number of instances to start",
        "Type" : "String"
    },

...

"MyAutoScalingGroup" : {
        "Type" : "AWS::AutoScaling::AutoScalingGroup",
        "Properties" : {
        "AvailabilityZones" : {"Fn::GetAZs" : ""},
        "LaunchConfigurationName" : { "Ref" : "MyLaunchConfiguration" },
        "MinSize" : "1",
        "MaxSize" : "2",
        "DesiredCapacity" : **{ "Ref" : "InstanceCount" }**,
        }
    },

...in other words, insert the number of initial instances (the capacity) from a parameter.

5

Short answer is : you can't. You can't get the exact same result (N identical EC2 instances, not tied by an auto scaling group).

Launching several instances alike from the console is not like creating an auto scaling group with N instances as desired capacity. It's just a useful shortcut you have, instead of having to go N times through the same EC2 creation process. It's called "a reservation" (no relation to reserved instance). Auto scaling groups are a different beast (even though you end up with N identical EC2 instances).

You can either:

  • duplicate (yuk) the EC2 resource in the template
  • use a nested template, which will do the EC2 creation itself, and call it N times from your master stack, feeding it each time with the same parameters

Problem is, the number of EC2 instances will not be dynamic, it cannot be a parameter.

  • use a frontend to CloudFormation templates, like troposphere, which allows you to write the EC2 description inside a function, and call the function N times (my choice now). At the end, you've got a CloudFormation template which does the job, but you've written the EC2 creation code only once. It's not a real CloudFormation parameter, but at the end of the day, you get your dynamical number of EC2.
  • 1
    I'd second the troposphere comment, this is the most efficient approach for this sort of problem. – Aitch Dec 11 '14 at 11:01
3

Meanwhile there are lots of AWS CloudFormation Sample Templates available, and several include launching multiple instances, albeit usually demonstrating other features in parallel; for example, the AutoScalingKeepAtNSample.template creates a load balanced, Auto Scaled sample website and is configured to start 2 EC2 instances for this purpose as per this template excerpt:

"WebServerGroup": {

    "Type": "AWS::AutoScaling::AutoScalingGroup",
    "Properties": {
        "AvailabilityZones": {
            "Fn::GetAZs": ""
        },
        "LaunchConfigurationName": {
            "Ref": "LaunchConfig"
        },
        "MinSize": "2",
        "MaxSize": "2",
        "LoadBalancerNames": [
            {
                "Ref": "ElasticLoadBalancer"
            }
        ]
    }

},

There are more advanced/complete samples available as well, e.g. the Drupal template for a Highly Available Web Server with Multi-AZ Amazon RDS database instance and using S3 for storing file content, which is currently configured to allow 1-5 web server instances talking to a Multi-AZ MySQL Amazon RDS database instance and running behind an Elastic Load Balancer, which orchestrates the web server instances via Auto Scaling.

2

Use the Ref function.

http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSCloudFormation/latest/UserGuide/intrinsic-function-reference-ref.html

User-defined variables are defined in the "Parameters" section of the config file. In the "Resources" section of the config file you can fill in values using references to these parameters.

{
    "AWSTemplateFormatVersion": "2010-09-09",
    ...
    "Parameters": {
        "MinNumInstances": {
            "Type": "Number",
            "Description": "Minimum number of instances to run.",
            "Default": "1",
            "ConstraintDescription": "Must be an integer less than MaxNumInstances."
        },
        "MaxNumInstances": {
            "Type": "Number",
            "Description": "Maximum number of instances to run.",
            "Default": "5",
            "ConstraintDescription": "Must be an integer greater than MinNumInstances."
        },
        "DesiredNumInstances": {
            "Type": "Number",
            "Description": "Number of instances that need to be running before creation is marked as complete in CloudFormation management console.",
            "Default": "1",
            "ConstraintDescription": "Must be an integer in the range specified by MinNumInstances..MaxNumInstances."
        }
    },
    "Resources": {
        "MyAutoScalingGroup": {
            "Type": "AWS::AutoScaling::AutoScalingGroup",
            "Properties": {
                ...
                "MinSize": { "Ref": "MinNumInstances" },
                "MaxSize": { "Ref": "MaxNumInstances" },
                "DesiredCapacity": { "Ref": "DesiredNumInstances" },
                ...
            },
        },
        ...
    },
    ...
}

In the example above { "Ref": ... } is used to fill values into the template. In this case we're providing integers as values for "MinSize" and "MaxSize".

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